11-27-2021  4:24 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

City’s Budget Windfall Means More for Police, Despite NAACP Demands

Group calls out lack of engagement from City Hall.

Oregon Resists Dropping Controversial Investments

Oregon residents are increasingly pushing for the state to divest from fossil fuel companies and other controversial investments, but the state treasury is resisting and putting the onus on the Legislature.

COVID-19: Oregon Drops Outdoor Mask Requirement

Oregon still has in place, a statewide indoor mask mandate for all public settings

Oregon Supreme Court Dismisses Challenge to Legislative Maps

The Oregon Supreme Court on Monday dismissed two challenges filed by Republicans to new state legislative districts approved by the Legislature in September.

NEWS BRIEFS

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Shop Local and Earn Free Parking With Parking Kitty

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Oregon Records More Than 5,000 COVID-19 Related Deaths

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Northwest Library Site Acquired as Part of Multnomah County Library Capital Bond Projects

Location will help library move towards permanent spaces, expedite other bond projects ...

Four LGBTQ Leaders to Be Inducted Into Hall of Fame

Governor Kate Brown included in 2021 class of inductees to be honored at Victory Fund’s 30th Anniversary Gala ...

At least 1 injured in shooting at mall in Tacoma, Washington

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Gunshots rang out at a Washington state mall packed with Black Friday shoppers, seriously wounding one person and panicking hundreds of others who hid inside stores as the mall went into lockdown. Authorities said the shooting in Tacoma, south of Seattle,...

Skeptic to advocate: Man survives scary bout of COVID-19

MYRTLE CREEK, Ore. (AP) — Howard Breidenbach thought it was all a big conspiracy. The government using a so-called “coronavirus” to control the people. Feeding drama. Making up numbers. “It was all a lie,” he thought. Until he...

No. 25 Arkansas beats Missouri, caps best season since 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Sam Pittman grinned for almost the entirety of his postgame press conference Friday night. The Arkansas coach and his team had done something no others ever had. The No. 25 Razorbacks capped their regular season with a 34-17 victory over Missouri,...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz returning to Arkansas for rivalry game

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Just 45 miles of interstate highway separate Eli Drinkwitz from where he started and where he is now as Missouri's head football coach. Raised in the small Arkansas town of Alma, Drinkwitz will come full circle Friday when his Tigers visit No. 25...

OPINION

State is Painting Lipstick on Its One-of-a-kind, Long-term-care Law

Starting in January, the unpopular law imposes a stiff new tax of 58 cents per 0 earned for every worker in the state ...

Giving Thanks

Just by being alive we can be sure of having moments of sadness as well as happiness. When you’re active in politics, you experience both wins and losses. Sometimes it can be hard to feel grateful. ...

Acting on Climate will Require an Emphasis on Environmental Justice

Climate change affects us all, but its effects aren’t distributed equally. ...

Small Businesses Cannot Survive With Current Level of Postal Service

At The Skanner News office we received an important piece of correspondence that was postmarked June 12, 2021, and delivered to us on November 4, 2021. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Solomon Islands violence recedes but not underlying tension

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Violence receded Friday in the capital of the Solomon Islands, but the government showed no signs of addressing the underlying grievances that sparked two days of riots, including concerns about the country's increasing links with China. Solomon...

Shots fired at police, journalists in Martinique COVID riots

PARIS (AP) — Shots were fired overnight at security forces and journalists on the French Caribbean island of Martinique amid violent protests against COVID-19 restrictions, France's interior minister said on Friday. Several police officers have been injured, Interior Minister...

Argentine movement tries to make Black heritage more visible

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — It wasn’t until Julia Cohen Ribeiro moved to Argentina that she discovered she was Black. Her hair was curly, but her skin was light. She had never identified as anything other than Brazilian in her country of birth. Then 11, she was shocked...

ENTERTAINMENT

Performers gear up for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

NEW YORK (AP) — Growing up in Chicago, Broadway star Brittney Mack faithfully watched the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on TV after fulfilling her own parade duties. Now she's getting ready to bundle up, hit the streets of Manhattan and be part of the big one for the first time. ...

U2's Edge leading rock memorabilia sale to help musicians

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Q&A: Alana Haim lives out a Valley dream in ‘Licorice Pizza’

When Paul Thomas Anderson first mentioned to Alana Haim that he wanted to put her in a movie, she assumed it would be as an extra walking through the frame, or something. And she thought that would be pretty great. They’d gotten to know one another’s families over the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are...

Activists block Amazon warehouses in Europe on Black Friday

Climate activists blockaded Amazon warehouses in three European countries on Friday, part of a global effort to...

Maxwell's brother says US prosecutors seeking to 'break' her

The brother of a British socialite charged with helping Jeffrey Epstein exploit underage girls says her...

US, 6 other nations urge tight ban on arms sales to Myanmar

BANGKOK (AP) — The United States and six other nations issued a joint statement Friday calling on the...

Ukraine leader alleges Russia-backed coup planned next week

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Friday claimed that his country's intelligence...

US lawmakers visit Taiwan; China conducts military patrols

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Five U.S. lawmakers met with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen on Friday in a surprise...

Christina Hoag and Geoff Mulvihill the Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Wall Street protesters in Los Angeles and Philadelphia defied orders to leave their months-old encampments, making it through the deadlines without the acrimony that marked earlier forced evictions in other cities.

Protesters chanted "we won, we won" as riot gear-clad Los Angeles police left on Monday, though there were four arrests. Occupy LA supporters asked a federal judge to bar the city from tearing down their encampment.

In Philadelphia, the camp was mostly quiet amid a heavy police presence, and on Monday morning a handful of people marching down one of the city's main business corridors banging drums.

When the camps would be cleared after officials in both cities ordered their removal was unclear.

"There is no concrete deadline," LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said after hundreds of officers withdrew without moving in on the camp. He said he wanted to make sure the removal would be safe for protesters and officers.

"With as little drama as possible," he told reporters.

Police and protesters have clashed in recent weeks, most notably in Oakland, Calif., as officers sometimes used pepper spray and tear gas to shutter camps that officials say have grown more dangerous for public health and safety.

Some of those encampments had been in use almost since the movement against economic disparity and perceived corporate greed began with Occupy Wall Street in Manhattan two months ago.



In Los Angeles, about half of the 485 tents had been taken down as of Sunday night, leaving patches of the 1.7-acre park around City Hall barren of grass and strewn with garbage.

Police turned back after hundreds of Occupy LA supporters showed up at the camp Sunday night as the midnight deadline for evacuation neared. As the night drew on, many demonstrators left.

Protester Julie Levine said she was surprised that police did not move in as the numbers dwindled. "We were fearful," she said. "But we held our numbers and police were on their best behavior."

Officers reopened the streets around 6:30 a.m.

"Let's go get breakfast," said Commander Andrew Smith as he removed his helmet.

The protest was largely peaceful but there were some skirmishes. Four people were arrested for failure to disperse and a few protesters tossed bamboo sticks and water bottles at officers, Smith said. No injuries were reported.

Jim Lafferty of the National Lawyers Guild said he filed a petition Monday in federal court, arguing that a City Council-passed resolution of support for the occupiers protects them from the city's ban on overnight camping.

In Philadelphia, a deadline set by the city for protesters to leave the site where it has camped for nearly two months passed Sunday without any arrests.

Dozens of tents remained at the encampment outside Philadelphia's City Hall on Monday, 12 hours after a city-imposed deadline passed for the protesters to move to make way for a construction project.

Along the steps leading into a Philadelphia plaza, about 50 people sat in lines Sunday with the promise that they would not leave unless they were carried out by authorities. For a time, they linked arms.

But as it seemed that a forceful ouster was not imminent, they relaxed a bit. A police presence was heavier than usual but no orders to leave had been issued.

A few dozen tents remained scattered on the plaza, along with trash, piles of dirty blankets and numerous signs reading, "You can't evict an idea."

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter was out of town Sunday, but his spokesman reiterated that "people are under orders to move."

The mayor had an exchange on Twitter with hip-hop impresario Russell Simmons, who asked Nutter "to remember this is a non-violent movement - please show restraint tonight." Nutter's response: "I agree."

Elsewhere, nine people were arrested in Maine after protesters in the Occupy Augusta encampment in Capitol Park took down their tents and packed their camping gear after being told to get a permit or move their shelters.

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Mulvihill reported from Philadelphia. Associated Press writers John Rogers and Andrew Dalton in Los Angeles, Kathy Matheson in Philadelphia, and Glenn Adams in Augusta, Maine contributed to this story.

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