09-24-2018  5:01 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

PBOT Announces Upcoming Focus Groups

Agency seeks feedback on Lloyd to Woodlawn Greenway, scooters and affordable housing ...

Celebration Tabernacle Church Celebrates 30 Years

The church invites the community to celebrate with them on Sunday, September 23. ...

Portland Center Stage Kicks Off Season with 'The Color Purple'

'The Color Purple' opens Friday, Sept. 21, at The Armory ...

Cop Out: Beyond Black, White & Blue

The August Wilson Red Door Project presents a series of monologues based on conversations with law enforcement ...

NuFuel Program Now Accepting Applications

Program awards grants of 5,000 - 30,000 dollars to cannabis businesses owned by people of color ...

Eugene man admits he crashed weddings, stole K in gifts

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon man accused of crashing four weddings in Junction City on the same day and stealing more than ,000 in gifts has pleaded guilty.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports 42-year-old Brian Keith Starr of Eugene pleaded guilty Friday to charges of aggravated...

UNR wins million USDA grant to study changing snowpack

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded the University of Nevada, Reno a million grant to lead a study on changing snowpack.UNR scientists will conduct the five-year study with researchers at the Desert Research Institute, Northern Arizona University and Arizona...

No. 2 Georgia clears another SEC hurdle at Missouri, 43-29

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Georgia coach Kirby Smart learned plenty in his days as an assistant under Alabama's Nick Saban.Among those lessons was a tendency to nitpick victories. After the second-ranked Bulldogs beat Missouri 43-29, Smart bemoaned his defense's inability to stop the run and some...

No. 2 Georgia prepared for high-powered Missouri offense

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Georgia's defense has been so good this season it has some opposing quarterbacks in awe."It's almost fun to watch when you're watching tape," Missouri quarterback Drew Lock said this week. "They're extremely athletic in the secondary. They're not going to let you chuck...

OPINION

Fair Housing’s Unfinished 50-Year Journey

Just as President Johnson stated 50 years ago, “We have come some of the way, not near all of it. There is much yet to do" ...

Jim Crow 2018

Jeffrey Boney says Black voting rights are under attack in America ...

Black Wave Sweeping Across the State of Florida

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, a Black man, saw the Florida primary election from a different lens ...

Black Political Excellence

What's exciting about today's Black political excellence is that it represents a generational changing of the guard ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Mandela: A life of soaring symbolism, now harnessed by UN

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Nelson Mandela's South African journey from anti-apartheid leader to prisoner to president to global statesman — the "Long Walk to Freedom" of his autobiography title — is one of the 20th century's great stories of struggle, sacrifice and reconciliation. Now...

[scripts/homepage/home.php] million in preservation grants aim to highlight diversity

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A preservation group is inviting the public to vote on 20 sites across the country that showcase the nation's diversity and the fight for equality as part of a [scripts/homepage/home.php] million historic preservation campaign.The project is a collaboration between The National Trust for Historic...

Cosby sentencing reveals generational divide over his legacy

Keon McGuire has no real attachment to Bill Cosby or his landmark show.As a black man, he's aware of the sitcom's place in pop culture, but he was barely in elementary school when "The Cosby Show" went off the air. Years later, he mostly tuned Cosby out after a widely panned speech to the NAACP in...

ENTERTAINMENT

Aretha Franklin exhibit debuts with eye toward her legacy

DETROIT (AP) — The Detroit museum that hosted Aretha Franklin's public visitations after her death is again holding space for her — this time with an exhibit featuring photographs, videos and the red shoes she wore at the first funeral viewing that drew global attention.Billed as a...

'House With a Clock in Its Walls' ticks to No. 1 in theaters

NEW YORK (AP) — The gothic family fantasy "The House With a Clock in Its Walls" exceeded expectations to debut with an estimated .9 million in ticket sales at the weekend box office, while audiences showed considerably less interest in Michael Moore's Donald Trump-themed documentary,...

Actor James Woods bashes Twitter after getting locked out

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Actor James Woods has been locked out of his Twitter account over a tweet he sent out months ago that was found to be in violation of Twitter's rules.The tweet was posted July 20 and includes a hoax meme that said it came from Democrats and encouraged men not to vote in...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Side effect of trafficking law: More street prostitution?

NEW YORK (AP) — Recent crackdowns targeting the sex-for-hire industry have reduced the number of commercial...

Florence: Evacuations continue as North Carolina rivers rise

BLADENBORO, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence is by no means done with the Carolinas, where some rivers are...

US, China hike tariffs as trade row intensifies

BEIJING (AP) — China and the United States imposed new tariff hikes on each other's goods Monday and...

Prosecutor: Nobel sex scandal suspect should get 3 years

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A Swedish prosecutor has demanded three years in prison for Jean-Claude Arnault,...

EU takes Poland to its top court over judicial reform

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has decided to take Poland to the bloc's top court over the overhaul of...

The Latest: Maldives' president concedes election loss

MALE, Maldives (AP) — The Latest on the Maldives presidential election (all times local):1 p.m.The...

By Juan Carlos Ord

By all means, send cards and flowers on Mother's Day.
But what moms (and dads) really need is Paid Family Leave Insurance. It would be a vital step in addressing today's changed family and economic landscapes.
One measure of those transformations came to light earlier this year, when the U.S. Labor Department announced that, for the first time ever, women outnumbered men on the nation's payrolls. To some extent, that news is worthy of celebration of our nation's progress toward gender equality.
Sadly, though, that milestone is also the product of economic necessity. After adjusting for inflation, the typical Oregon man's wages have fallen by more than $3 an hour over the past three decades. Adding to families' woes, the costs of health care, transportation, housing and childcare have all gone up. Just to stay afloat, more families today depend on a second paycheck.
That means that more breadwinners today must juggle work and family responsibilities. In 2006-07, among nearly two-thirds of the nation's married couples with children, both parents worked outside the home. Among single mothers, 73 percent were employed. For single fathers, the rate was 85 percent.
So what happens to these households when work and family responsibilities collide? What happens when a serious illness strikes a child or an elderly parent, requiring attention? What happens when a newborn arrives?
Under such circumstances, both the federal Family and Medical Leave Act and the more expansive Oregon Family Leave Act grant some, but not all, workers the right to take unpaid time off. In other words: tend to your family, but good luck covering the rent, groceries and other bills.
For households living on the edge, or close to it, time off without pay -- even if the breadwinner is legally entitled to it -- is practically meaningless. Some employers offer some type of paid leave that can be used to deal with family emergencies. But the workers most in need of paid leave, low-wage workers, are the least likely to enjoy such benefits.
Fortunately, efforts are underway in Oregon to resolve the harsh predicament facing many working families. Time to Care for Oregon Families, a growing statewide coalition, is calling for enactment of Paid Family Leave Insurance in Oregon. Their bottom line is that no one should be forced to choose between their family and their job.
The legislation proposed by Time to Care for Oregon Families would provide up to six weeks of paid time off after the birth or adoption of a new child, or when a family member is seriously ill. The insurance would be funded by a 2-cent-per-hour payroll deduction from eligible employees' paychecks.
Paid Family Leave Insurance would not only protect many working families but also may benefit their employers' bottom line. Paid family leave could help productivity because it may improve employee morale and lower turnover and absenteeism.
Oregon small businesses, in particular, might come out ahead as a result of Paid Family Leave Insurance. By offering a benefit to their employees that employers can't afford on their own, the program could help small businesses compete with bigger companies for talented employees.
If the efforts of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition prove successful in the 2011 legislative session, Oregon families will get a great gift, especially if it arrives in time for next year's Mother's and Father's Days.


Juan Carlos Ordóñez is communications director for the Oregon Center for Public Policy (ocpp.org), a member of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition (oregonpaidfamilyleave.org)


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