02-20-2019  4:23 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Q Center to Host Feb. 24 Town Hall on Reported Violent Attacks

Individuals can receive a free Uber ride to the event ...

NAACP Challenge to Prison Gerrymandering Moves Forward

Federal judge refuses to dismiss suit over discriminatory counting of incarcerated persons ...

Law Librarians in Beaverton and Tigard Libraries

A law librarian will provide assistance on a walk-in basis once a month at the Beaverton City Main Library and Tigard Public Library ...

Students Tour Washington to Support 100% Clean Energy

WashPIRG Students and Environment Washington are pushing a clean energy bill with support from Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal ...

Black Lit is LIT

BPI will host Black History Month book fair and cultural literacy event at Barnes & Noble on Feb. 23 ...

50M gallons of polluted water pours daily from US mine sites

RIMINI, Mont. (AP) — Every day many millions of gallons of water loaded with arsenic, lead and other toxic metals flow from some of the most contaminated mining sites in the U.S. and into surrounding streams and ponds without being treated, The Associated Press has found.That torrent is...

Recent snowfall is helping Oregon snowpack recover

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Winter storms that dumped snow this month have helped Oregon's snowpack recover after lower-than-normal measurements — a boon for farmers and ranchers who have endured dry conditions recently.The entire state has seen a 20 to 30 percent bump in snowpack and two to...

Missouri appeals NCAA sanctions levied against 3 sports

Missouri filed a notice of appeal with the NCAA's committee on infractions Thursday, beginning what could be a lengthy fight of what it considers overly harsh sanctions levied against three of its programs for academic misconduct involving a former tutor.The NCAA banned the football, baseball and...

Indiana St gives Mallory contract extension through 2023

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — Indiana State coach Curt Mallory has agreed to a two-year contract extension that will run through 2023.Athletic department officials made the announcement Tuesday.Last season Mallory led the Sycamores to a 7-4 mark, a No. 22 ranking and a third-place finish in the...

OPINION

Why We Need Net Neutrality

It didn’t have to be this way for net neutrality, and it doesn’t need to stay this way either ...

There’s an Uprising Going on in Sudan

We have heard stories of horror, murder, refugees, and systematic repression — now we hear of revolution ...

NAACP Celebrates 110th Anniversary of Freedom Fighting

After the Springfield race riots of 1908, “People got together around the country, especially throughout Illinois, and said again enough is enough." ...

Decreasing Harm to Communities Impacted by the Criminal Justice System

Many facets of the justice system have taken heavy financial and social tolls on individuals struggling with addiction and mental illness ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Armando Rodriguez, WWII vet who served 4 US presidents, dies

Armando Rodriguez, a Mexican immigrant and World War II veteran who went on to serve under four American presidents while pressing for civil rights, has died.Christy Rodriguez, his daughter, said Wednesday her father died early Sunday morning at their San Diego home from complications of a stroke....

Key moments since Jussie Smollett reported Chicago attack

CHICAGO (AP) — "Empire" actor and R&B singer Jussie Smollett told Chicago police last month that two men physically attacked him and yelled racial and homophobic slurs. Some key moments in the story:Jan. 29— Jussie Smollett tells police he was physically attacked by two men in...

Detroit center to remove name of ex-mayor with racist past

DETROIT (AP) — Detroit's Cobo Center, which hosts the auto show and other major events, is changing its name to remove the surname of a former mayor known for his racist policies, officials announced Wednesday.The Detroit Regional Convention Facility Authority announced it has sold Cobo...

ENTERTAINMENT

Amal Clooney among the gang at Meghan Markle's baby shower

NEW YORK (AP) — The not-so-secret baby shower for the Duchess of Sussex has apparently occurred, with Gayle King and Amal Clooney among an intimate group of friends gathered at a swanky hotel on Manhattan's Upper East Side.The smiling Meghan Markle has been surrounded by fans and...

Oscars: A record year for women, but is it progress?

LOS ANGELES (AP) — At the glad-handy Oscar nominees luncheon earlier this month, film academy president John Bailey proudly told the 171 nominees in the room that there were a record number of women nominated for Academy Awards this year. The statement seemed to take everyone a moment to...

Khloe Kardashian bestie Malika Haqq fierce on cheating front

NEW YORK (AP) — Who's the best wing woman on the planet? That would be Malika Haqq.The Khloe Kardashian bestie has taken to social media amid rumors that Tristan Thompson has cheated again, this time reportedly making out at a Los Angeles house party last weekend with Jordyn Woods.The...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

After veteran salaries drop, baseball players want change

NEW YORK (AP) — Neil Walker's salary dropped from .2 million to [scripts/homepage/home.php] million in two years. Greg Holland...

Aid wars: US-Russia vie to ease Venezuelan crisis

MOSCOW (AP) — Call it the aid wars.The Trump administration is accusing President Nicolas Maduro of...

Lawyers for El Chapo concerned by juror misconduct claims

NEW YORK (AP) — El Chapo's lawyers raised concerns of potential juror misconduct and were reviewing their...

Deadly crackdown stokes fear among protesters in Venezuela

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Jhonny Godoy had taken to Twitter to proclaim his opposition to President Nicolas...

Powerful political leader warns against squandering peace

HERAT, Afghanistan (AP) — A prominent Afghan political leader who once had the support of some officials to...

Possible peace declaration looms large over Trump-Kim summit

TOKYO (AP) — With their second summit fast approaching, speculation is growing that U.S. President Donald...

McMenamins
By Juan Carlos Ord

By all means, send cards and flowers on Mother's Day.
But what moms (and dads) really need is Paid Family Leave Insurance. It would be a vital step in addressing today's changed family and economic landscapes.
One measure of those transformations came to light earlier this year, when the U.S. Labor Department announced that, for the first time ever, women outnumbered men on the nation's payrolls. To some extent, that news is worthy of celebration of our nation's progress toward gender equality.
Sadly, though, that milestone is also the product of economic necessity. After adjusting for inflation, the typical Oregon man's wages have fallen by more than $3 an hour over the past three decades. Adding to families' woes, the costs of health care, transportation, housing and childcare have all gone up. Just to stay afloat, more families today depend on a second paycheck.
That means that more breadwinners today must juggle work and family responsibilities. In 2006-07, among nearly two-thirds of the nation's married couples with children, both parents worked outside the home. Among single mothers, 73 percent were employed. For single fathers, the rate was 85 percent.
So what happens to these households when work and family responsibilities collide? What happens when a serious illness strikes a child or an elderly parent, requiring attention? What happens when a newborn arrives?
Under such circumstances, both the federal Family and Medical Leave Act and the more expansive Oregon Family Leave Act grant some, but not all, workers the right to take unpaid time off. In other words: tend to your family, but good luck covering the rent, groceries and other bills.
For households living on the edge, or close to it, time off without pay -- even if the breadwinner is legally entitled to it -- is practically meaningless. Some employers offer some type of paid leave that can be used to deal with family emergencies. But the workers most in need of paid leave, low-wage workers, are the least likely to enjoy such benefits.
Fortunately, efforts are underway in Oregon to resolve the harsh predicament facing many working families. Time to Care for Oregon Families, a growing statewide coalition, is calling for enactment of Paid Family Leave Insurance in Oregon. Their bottom line is that no one should be forced to choose between their family and their job.
The legislation proposed by Time to Care for Oregon Families would provide up to six weeks of paid time off after the birth or adoption of a new child, or when a family member is seriously ill. The insurance would be funded by a 2-cent-per-hour payroll deduction from eligible employees' paychecks.
Paid Family Leave Insurance would not only protect many working families but also may benefit their employers' bottom line. Paid family leave could help productivity because it may improve employee morale and lower turnover and absenteeism.
Oregon small businesses, in particular, might come out ahead as a result of Paid Family Leave Insurance. By offering a benefit to their employees that employers can't afford on their own, the program could help small businesses compete with bigger companies for talented employees.
If the efforts of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition prove successful in the 2011 legislative session, Oregon families will get a great gift, especially if it arrives in time for next year's Mother's and Father's Days.


Juan Carlos Ordóñez is communications director for the Oregon Center for Public Policy (ocpp.org), a member of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition (oregonpaidfamilyleave.org)


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