07-19-2018  7:48 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

Komen Begins Data Collection to Address Breast Cancer Disparities

In anticipation of forming an initiative to address breast cancer disparities, Komen partners with independent contractors ...

American Underground Announces Call for Applications

Black startup founders have until August 6 to apply to Google For Entrepreneurs Exchange program ...

Experience the Culture at the Second Annual Pan African Festival of Oregon

Event will take place from 12 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. August 11 ...

Oregon Humane Society Photo Contest Now Open

Submissions for annual pet photo contest open until August 15 ...

Jury deliberates in man's trial in Texas student's slaying

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The jury has ended its first day of deliberations in the capital murder trial of a 20-year-old man accused in the slaying of a University of Texas student on campus in 2016.The jury began deliberations Thursday in the trial of Meechaiel Criner, who was a 17-year-old...

Oregon wheat farmers try to stop fire that's consuming crops

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Farmers rushed to save their livelihoods as a wildfire roared through vast Oregon wheat fields Thursday and crushed their hopes at the peak of what was expected to be one of the most bountiful harvests in years.Farmers used water tanks on the backs of pickup trucks and...

Police: 2 dead in crash after motorcyclist flees in Tacoma

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say two people riding a motorcycle died in a crash after Pierce County Sheriff's deputies tried to pull them over and the motorcyclist fled.The sheriff's office says deputies signaled the motorcyclist to pull over Thursday afternoon in Tacoma for reckless...

Big move for Big Bird: Sesame Street is entering classrooms

SEATTLE (AP) — Sesame Street is taking its beloved, critically acclaimed brand of educational television into the highly profitable world of classroom curriculum — a move that experts say could open the door for other companies to move into the sensitive learning space with possible...

OPINION

Roland Martin: Pleading Our Own Cause

Julianne Malveaux says many of us talk a good game, but we don't sustain Black-owned media enough to help it thrive ...

Newsprint Tariffs Another Assault on the Black Press

The NNPA opposes the Trump tariffs on newsprint and demands an end to the disastrous trade policies that are hurting our businesses and communities ...

A Letter from America’s Children

American children struggling with poverty, violence and homelessness, deserve media coverage, too ...

Rep. Maxine Waters Takes Strong Stand for Fair Housing

Congresswoman Maxine Waters recently stepped up to file legislation designed to cure many of regressive ills pushed by Secretary Carson ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Falsely accused black college students get apology

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The city manager and police chief in a suburban St. Louis town apologized Thursday to a group of black college students after police wrongly accused them of a dine-and-dash and used several squad cars to escort them back to a restaurant.Clayton city manager Craig Owens said...

Ted Williams' Mexican-American heritage explored in PBS film

ALBQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Ted Williams is the last major league baseball player to hit over .400. The Boston Red Sox slugger captivated millions with his dazzling swing and towering homers throughout the 1940s and 1950s in competition with New York Yankees hero Joe DiMaggio.But beneath the...

Papa John's notes inquiry after reports of sexist behavior

NEW YORK (AP) — Papa John's says it is already investigating and will take action if necessary as a report says founder John Schnatter oversaw a culture where women were subject to sexist behavior.The Forbes story Thursday follows a report by the magazine last week that said Schnatter used a...

ENTERTAINMENT

Comic-Con programming kicks off with 'The Predator'

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Actors Sterling K. Brown, Olivia Munn and Keegan-Michael Key have gotten the first day of programming at San Diego Comic-Con off to a lively start Thursday morning with an intense look at "The Predator" sequel.Speaking to some 6,500 audience members in the convention's...

Disney announces new Star Wars 'Clone Wars' episodes

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Disney says it will release new episodes of the Star Wars animated series "The Clone Wars" on its upcoming streaming platform.The 12-episode run was announced Thursday during a panel at Comic-Con in San Diego. In an announcement, Disney says the show will continue the story...

Ted Williams' Mexican-American heritage explored in PBS film

ALBQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Ted Williams is the last major league baseball player to hit over .400. The Boston Red Sox slugger captivated millions with his dazzling swing and towering homers throughout the 1940s and 1950s in competition with New York Yankees hero Joe DiMaggio.But beneath the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Gene tests can provide health clues -- and needless worry

NEW YORK (AP) — Last year, Katie Burns got a phone call that shows what can happen in medicine when...

Zuckerberg's Holocaust comment puts Facebook on the spot

NEW YORK (AP) — Denying the Holocaust happened is probably OK on Facebook. Calling for a mob to kill Jews...

Home demolitions may create new problem: lead-tainted dust

DETROIT (AP) — The nation's largest home-demolition program, which has torn down more than 14,000 vacant...

Video emerges of Macron bodyguard beating protester in Paris

PARIS (AP) — A video showing one of French President Emmanuel Macron's security chiefs beating a student...

Cameroon military, separatists blamed for 'grave abuses'

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Violent tensions between Cameroon's government and Anglophone separatists have forced...

Southern Iraq's woes to continue, renewed protests possible

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq's government may have muddled its way through violent street protests in the country's...

By Juan Carlos Ord

By all means, send cards and flowers on Mother's Day.
But what moms (and dads) really need is Paid Family Leave Insurance. It would be a vital step in addressing today's changed family and economic landscapes.
One measure of those transformations came to light earlier this year, when the U.S. Labor Department announced that, for the first time ever, women outnumbered men on the nation's payrolls. To some extent, that news is worthy of celebration of our nation's progress toward gender equality.
Sadly, though, that milestone is also the product of economic necessity. After adjusting for inflation, the typical Oregon man's wages have fallen by more than $3 an hour over the past three decades. Adding to families' woes, the costs of health care, transportation, housing and childcare have all gone up. Just to stay afloat, more families today depend on a second paycheck.
That means that more breadwinners today must juggle work and family responsibilities. In 2006-07, among nearly two-thirds of the nation's married couples with children, both parents worked outside the home. Among single mothers, 73 percent were employed. For single fathers, the rate was 85 percent.
So what happens to these households when work and family responsibilities collide? What happens when a serious illness strikes a child or an elderly parent, requiring attention? What happens when a newborn arrives?
Under such circumstances, both the federal Family and Medical Leave Act and the more expansive Oregon Family Leave Act grant some, but not all, workers the right to take unpaid time off. In other words: tend to your family, but good luck covering the rent, groceries and other bills.
For households living on the edge, or close to it, time off without pay -- even if the breadwinner is legally entitled to it -- is practically meaningless. Some employers offer some type of paid leave that can be used to deal with family emergencies. But the workers most in need of paid leave, low-wage workers, are the least likely to enjoy such benefits.
Fortunately, efforts are underway in Oregon to resolve the harsh predicament facing many working families. Time to Care for Oregon Families, a growing statewide coalition, is calling for enactment of Paid Family Leave Insurance in Oregon. Their bottom line is that no one should be forced to choose between their family and their job.
The legislation proposed by Time to Care for Oregon Families would provide up to six weeks of paid time off after the birth or adoption of a new child, or when a family member is seriously ill. The insurance would be funded by a 2-cent-per-hour payroll deduction from eligible employees' paychecks.
Paid Family Leave Insurance would not only protect many working families but also may benefit their employers' bottom line. Paid family leave could help productivity because it may improve employee morale and lower turnover and absenteeism.
Oregon small businesses, in particular, might come out ahead as a result of Paid Family Leave Insurance. By offering a benefit to their employees that employers can't afford on their own, the program could help small businesses compete with bigger companies for talented employees.
If the efforts of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition prove successful in the 2011 legislative session, Oregon families will get a great gift, especially if it arrives in time for next year's Mother's and Father's Days.


Juan Carlos Ordóñez is communications director for the Oregon Center for Public Policy (ocpp.org), a member of the Time to Care for Oregon Families coalition (oregonpaidfamilyleave.org)


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