05-15-2021  7:33 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Police, FBI Respond to Threats of Gun Violence

Citing intelligence that there are “imminent” efforts from outside groups to “engage and advance gun violence” this weekend, the Portland City Council announced police and the FBI will be on the streets of the city for the next few days

Gov.: Mask Requirement Lifted for Fully Vaccinated in Oregon

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has announced that the state will immediately follow guidance from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Jay Inslee: State on Track to Fully Reopen June 30

Washington is on track to fully reopen its economy by June 30, and a full reopening could happen even sooner if 70% or more of residents ages 16 and older have gotten at least one dose of vaccine by then.

Inslee: Open Carry of Weapons Now Prohibited at Rallies, Capitol

Last week the Oregon Legislature passed a measure that bans guns from the state Capitol.

NEWS BRIEFS

OHS Looks Back to "Guatemalan Immigration: Indigenous Transborder Communities"

In the 1980s, people from Guatemala, seeking refuge from violence and harsh economic and social inequities, began building sister...

Vancouver Principal Resigns Amid Racist Language Accusations

Johnson had led Mountain View High School since 2014 but had been on paid administrative leave almost two months. ...

Oregon Cares Fund Resumes Disbursement of Funds to Black Community

Funds started being released again last week ...

Audit: Portland Skipped Safeguards to Get Virus Grants Out

The audit found that race was given priority, but women were not prioritized, and it was not documented how various factors weighed in...

Portland Audubon Hosts ‘Nature Night, Centering Justice and Identity’ Virtual Event

The discussion to be held on June 1, focuses on building inclusive scientific communities for our shared future ...

Officials: invasive green crabs spreading along coast

SEATTLE (AP) — European green crabs were found in Washington’s inland waters in 2016, prompting extensive monitoring. Now state officials say this destructive invasive species is spreading in several coastal locations. They thrive in shallow water and soft sediment, which...

Call center in Vancouver shuttered due to COVID-19 outbreak

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Public health authorities say a broadband call center in Vancouver, Washington has been temporarily closed because of a COVID-19 outbreak that has resulted in 29 confirmed and two possible cases. Public Health spokeswoman Marissa Armstrong said in an...

OPINION

OP-ED: The Supreme Court Can Protect Black Lives by Ending Qualified Immunity

The three officers responsible for the murder of Breonna Taylor are not the first to walk free after killing an unarmed Black person, and unfortunately, especially if things continue as they are, they will not be the last. ...

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Trade Arron Rodgers

Give Aaron Rodgers a break, Green Bay. Just like Bart Starr & Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers has been a Hall of Fame quarterback for the Packers for 16 years. ...

Editorial From the Publisher - Council: Police Reform Needed Now

Through years of ceaseless protest, activists have tried to hold Portland Police to account. ...

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

'Sins of our past': Apologies for 1970 Jackson St. shootings

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The mayor of Mississippi's capital city and a state senator both apologized Saturday for shootings 51 years ago by city and state police officers that killed two people and injured 12 others on the campus of a historically Black college. Jackson Mayor...

Racist attacks revive Asian American studies program demand

As Dartmouth College sophomore Nicholas Sugiarto flipped through the course catalog last semester, two words caught his eye: “Asian American.” The 19-year-old Chinese Indonesian American didn't know Asian American-focused classes were even an option at the Hanover, New...

US warns extremists may strike as virus restrictions ease

WASHINGTON (AP) — A national terrorism alert issued Friday warns that violent extremists may take advantage of the easing of pandemic restrictions to conduct attacks. The alert does not cite any specific threats. But it warns of potential danger from an increasingly complex...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ewan McGregor won't soon forget his fashion turn as Halston

NEW YORK (AP) — Imagine, if you will, a galaxy far, far away where the one-name fashion wonder Halston dresses Obi-Wan Kenobi in something fabulous from the swinging '70s. Ewan McGregor can. Sort of. McGregor is in the unique position of being the sole...

Maren Morris, Miranda Lambert lead CMT Music Awards noms

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Former tourmates Miranda Lambert and Maren Morris are the leading nominees for the 2021 CMT Music Awards, celebrating the best in country music videos. CMT on Thursday announced the nominees for their June 9 fan-voted awards show, where Morris and...

Locked out stagehands protest outside Metropolitan Opera

NEW YORK (AP) — Locked out Metropolitan Opera stagehands protested the use of nonunion shops to construct sets for the company's upcoming season, attracting a crowd of roughly 1,000 people outside Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Thursday. The Met has been shuttered by...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Pipeline operator says "normal operations" have resumed

ATLANTA (AP) — The operator of the nation's largest gasoline pipeline — hit on May 7th by a ransomware attack...

The Latest: Israeli airstrikes hit buildings, roads in Gaza

The Latest on the continuing violence between Israel and Gaza's militant Hamas rulers amid the latest escalation...

Kid reporter who interviewed Obama at White House dies at 23

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The student reporter who gained national acclaim when he interviewed President...

Merkel to youth: Build political support for climate action

BERLIN (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she understands young people's frustration about the pace of...

China cancels Everest climbs over fears of virus from Nepal

BEIJING (AP) — China has canceled attempts to climb Mount Everest from its side of the world's highest peak...

Masks off, Poles cheer reopening of bars and restaurants

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poles pulled off their masks, hugged their friends and made toasts to their regained...

The Skanner It's Easy
Kimberly Dozier AP Intelligence Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Bruised from their latest diplomatic clash, the U.S. and Pakistan are trying to bandage their relationship by forging a new joint intelligence team to go after top terrorism suspects, officials say.

The move comes after Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton presented the Pakistanis with the U.S. list of most-wanted terrorism targets, U.S. and Pakistani officials said Wednesday. The list includes some groups the Pakistanis have been reluctant to attack, U.S. officials said.

It's one of a host of confidence-building measures meant to restore trust blown on both sides after U.S. forces tracked down and killed al-Qaida mastermind Osama bin Laden during a secret raid in Pakistan last month.

But it also amounts to a new test of loyalty for both sides. The Pakistanis say the U.S. has failed to share its best intelligence, instead running numerous unilateral spying operations on its soil.

U.S. officials say they need to see the Pakistanis target militants they've long sheltered, including the Haqqani network, which operates with impunity in the Pakistani tribal areas while attacking U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

All those interviewed spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss matters of intelligence.

The U.S. and Pakistan have engaged in a diplomatic stare-down since the May 2 raid, with the Pakistanis outraged over the unilateral action as an affront to its sovereignty and the Americans angry to find that bin Laden had been hiding for more than five years in a military town just 35 miles from the capital, Islamabad.

The U.S. deliberately hid the operation from Pakistan, recipient of billions in counterterrorism aid, for fear that the operation would leak to militants.

A series of high-level U.S. visits has aimed to take the edge off. Marc Grossman, the special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, and CIA Deputy Director Mike Morell met with intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha last month. Last week, the secretary of state and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Adm. Mike Mullen, held a day of intensive meetings with top Pakistani military and civilian officials.

After that outreach, Pakistan allowed the CIA to re-examine the bin Laden compound last Friday. Pakistan also returned the tail section of a U.S. stealth Black Hawk helicopter that broke off when the SEALs blew up the aircraft to destroy its secret noise- and radar-deadening technology.

The CIA has also shared some information gleaned from the raid, and Pakistan has reciprocated, U.S. and Pakistani officials said Wednesday.

The investigative team will be made up mainly of intelligence officers from both nations, according to two U.S. officials and one Pakistani official. It would draw in part on any intelligence emerging from the CIA's analysis of computer and written files gathered by the Navy SEALs who raided bin Laden's hideout in Abbottabad, as well as Pakistani intelligence gleaned from interrogations of those who frequented or lived near the bin Laden compound, the officials said.

The formation of the team marks a return to the counterterrorism cooperation that has led to major takedowns of al-Qaida militants, like the joint arrest of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in 2003.

The joint intelligence team will go after five top targets, including al-Qaida No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahri, a possible bin Laden successor, and al-Qaida operations chief Atiya Abdel Rahman, as well as Taliban leader like Mullah Omar, all of whom U.S. intelligence officials believe are hiding in Pakistan, one U.S. official said.

Another target is Siraj Haqqani, leader of the Haqqani tribe in Pakistan's lawless tribal areas. Allied with the Taliban and al-Qaida, the Haqqanis are behind some of the deadliest attacks against U.S. troops and Afghan civilians in Afghanistan. U.S. intelligence officials say their top commanders live openly in the Pakistani city of Miram Shah, close to a Pakistani army outpost.

Pakistani officials say the U.S. has never provided them accurate intelligence as to the Haqqani leadership's location. Pakistani officials also argue that as the Haqqani network has been careful never to attack the Pakistani government, there is no reason to attack them.

One official said a final target on this preliminary list is Mohammad Ilyas Kashmiri, leader of a group called Harakat-ul-Jihad al-Islami, which the State Department blames for several attacks in India and Pakistan, including a 2006 suicide bombing against the U.S. consulate in Karachi that killed four people.

A second U.S. official confirmed that the Pakistanis and Americans have agreed to go after a handful of militants as a confidence-building measure, but the official would not confirm the specific names on the list.

Pakistani officials say those five have always been top targets, but they also did not confirm that the new agreement specifically names them as joint targets.

Intelligence-sharing operations between the U.S. and Pakistan were already strained before the bin Laden raid, particularly by the arrest and detention in January of CIA security contractor Raymond Davis in the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men. Davis said the two were trying to rob him.

Davis was eventually released in March after the dead men's relatives agreed to accept blood money under Islamic tradition, an agreement Pakistani intelligence officials say they brokered.

But only a day after his release, a covert CIA drone strike killed at least two dozen people in the Pakistani tribal areas - people the CIA said were militants and the Pakistanis said were civilians.

Both sides disputed media reports that Pakistan had completely shut down joint intelligence centers it operates with the Americans following the bin Laden raid.

Two of the five "intelligence fusion centers" where the U.S. shares satellite, drone and other intelligence with the Pakistanis were mothballed last fall, long before either the Davis or bin Laden controversies, the Pakistani official and another U.S. official say. It was part of the fallout of the public embarrassment of the WikiLeaks cables disclosures, which revealed a closer U.S.-Pakistani military relationship than publicly acknowledged by Pakistan.

Two other fusion centers, plus smaller cooperative intelligence-sharing facilities, remain operational, both sides say, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss matters of intelligence.

The high-value target team is expected to use any intelligence found at the bin Laden compound in the hunt, although a month after the raid analysts have found nothing "actionable," a term describing intelligence that leads to a strike or operation against a new al-Qaida target, two U.S. officials say. The CIA-led teams have gotten through more than 60 percent of the computer files and written material taken from the compound so far.

They spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the ongoing review of the now-classified bin Laden files.

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