05-23-2019  2:31 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Lillard, Kemba, Lebron Among Noteworthy All-NBA Picks

Lillard receives All-NBA honors for the fourth time in his career.

Workshop Teaches ‘Civil Rights and Civil Wrongs’ Curriculum

Applications open for educators’ workshop on teaching Portland Black history

Portland to Host Alzheimer’s Conference

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America to hold educational conference June 11

Fitzpatrick to Retire

Longtime leader of PCRI moving on; organization interviewing candidates this week

NEWS BRIEFS

The Portland Clinic Foundation Awards $60,000 to 28 Portland-Area Nonprofits

Recipients include SEI, Coalition of Communities of Color ...

Albina Vision Trust Receives Meyer Memorial Trust Grant

Two-year grant will be used to increase Albina Vision’s capacity ...

Community Celebrates New Evelyn Crowell Center African American Exhibit at Cascade

On Monday, June 3, the PCC Cascade campus will host an official opening ceremony for the Evelyn Crowell Center for African American...

James Bible Seeks Bellevue City Council Seat

Civil rights attorney says he wants to prioritize housing, wages ...

North Clackamas School Named in Honor of Supreme Court Judge Adrienne Nelson

The Rock Creed Middle School will be converted and renamed in honor of Oregon Supreme Court Justice, Adrienne C. Nelson. ...

Owner of Bend Bulletin plans to dissolve the company

BEND, Ore. (AP) — The owner of the Bend Bulletin plans to dissolve the company and sell all seven newspapers in its Pacific Northwest chain, according to a liquidation plan filed in federal bankruptcy court Wednesday.Oregon Public Broadcasting reports that in the plan, filed in federal...

Senate approves cut to public employee retirement benefits

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Senate sent the House a short-term pension fix Thursday cutting public employee retirement benefits, a politically difficult vote for Democrats who say they were forced to choose between slashing benefits or letting employer interest rates rise.Ultimately, some...

Clemson transfer Kelly Bryant finds new home at Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — By the end of last season, Missouri fans were enjoying quarterback Drew Lock's final days running the Tigers' offense and wondering who would take over this fall.The answer came in a Twitter post the night of Dec. 4 when Kelly Bryant announced he was transferring to...

Missouri files brief as it seeks to overturn NCAA sanctions

Missouri submitted its appeals brief to the NCAA on Monday, taking the next step in attempting to limit or overturn what it believes are overly harsh sanctions in the case of a rogue former tutor.The school argued in the 64-page brief to the NCAA's appeals committee that the penalties handed down...

OPINION

Forget the Adversity Score, Just Dump the SAT

Forget the Adversity Score, Just Dump the SAT ...

On the History of Medical Marijuana

The recent legalization of cannabis medicinally throughout the United States of America has made Cannabis sativa L., colloquially termed marijuana, hemp, or weed, the growing topic of conversation. ...

The Skanner News Endorsements May 2019

The Skanner endorses candidates in upcoming school board, PCC races ...

How Should We Handle Right-Wing Disrupters?

Liberal and progressive individuals and institutions should expect disruptions to not only continue but to increase in scale. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Jail calls: Suspect, ex laughed at Tennessee church shooting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Jurors on Thursday heard jail calls in which a suspect charged with fatally shooting a woman and wounding seven people at a Nashville church in 2017 laughs about it with his then-girlfriend.The October 2017 calls were replayed in court Thursday in the Nashville trial...

West Point to graduate record number of black female cadets

WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — The class of cadets preparing to jubilantly toss their caps in the air at the U.S. Military Academy's graduation ceremony Saturday includes 34 black women, a record number that's a sign of concerted efforts to diversify West Point's Long Gray Line.West Point remains...

Charlottesville drama teacher to get special Tony Award

NEW YORK (AP) — The special Tony Award that honors educators this year will go to a drama teacher in Charlottesville, Virginia, who has encouraged her students to explore their differences and heal rifts, especially following a deadly 2017 white nationalist rally in the city.Madeline Michel...

ENTERTAINMENT

Batali accuser's attorneys: Chef must he held accountable

BOSTON (AP) — Lawyers for a woman who says Mario Batali forcibly kissed and groped her in a Boston restaurant in 2017 said Thursday the celebrity chef must be held accountable.Batali, who recently gave up financial stakes in all his restaurants, is to be arraigned Friday in Boston on a...

Kim Kardashian West locks arms with prison reform warriors

NEW YORK (AP) — Brittany K. Barnett and MiAngel Cody are warrior attorneys with a mission: freeing drug offenders serving life in a federal system the lawyers are working to reform.When it comes to the cause, their energy is boundless, Barnett through her Buried Alive Project and Cody as...

Netflix isn't absent at Cannes. It's everywhere.

CANNES, France (AP) — If you're going to earnestly shout "Vive le cinema!" the Cannes Film Festival is the place to do it.That's what Quentin Tarantino declared from atop Cannes' red-carpet stairs on his way into the premiere of "Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood," his affectionate ode to...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Illegal killings, political opposition hobble wolf recovery

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Illegal killings and longstanding political resistance have undercut the return of two...

Far from border, US cities feel effect of migrant releases

MIAMI (AP) — A surge of asylum-seeking families has been straining cities along the southern U.S. border...

Woman who helped put away serial killer awaits his execution

STARKE, Fla. (AP) — At 17, Lisa Noland was fighting for her life. A killer on a rampage that would leave 10...

'War is ugly': For French vet, D-Day's lessons are timeless

OUISTREHAM, France (AP) — There were countless times on D-Day and in the fighting in Normandy that followed...

For Gaza grooms, crippling debt overshadows marital bliss

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Two years ago, Gaza resident Saleh Abu Serdanah took out a small loan in order...

Senior German diplomat in Tehran for nuclear deal talks

BERLIN (AP) — A senior German diplomat headed Thursday to Tehran to press Iran to continue to respect the...

McMenamins
By Martha Waggoner of the Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)— An unpublished study by Duke University researchers that says black students are more likely to switch to less difficult majors has upset some students, who say the research is emblematic of more entrenched racial problems.

The study, which opponents of affirmative action are using in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider, concludes black students match the GPA of Whites over time partially because they switch to majors that require less study time and have less stringent grading standards. Opponents of affirmative action cite the study in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider.

About three dozen students held a silent protest Sunday outside a speech by black political strategist Donna Brazile that was part of the school's annual Martin Luther King Jr. observance. And members of the Black Student Alliance have met with the provost to express their unhappiness with the study and other issues on campus.

"I don't know what needs to happen to make Duke wake up," said Nana Asante, a senior psychology major and president of the Black Student Alliance.

The reaction from black students has surprised one of the researchers, who said he wanted to show the need to find ways to keep minorities in difficult majors such as the natural sciences, economics and engineering.

Peter Arcidiacono, an economics professor at Duke, wrote the paper in May 2011 along with a graduate student and Ken Spenner, a sociology professor. Spenner and Arcidiacono are white. It's been under review since June at the Journal of Public Economics.

The statistics would likely reflect trends at other schools, Arcidiacono said. The study notes that national science organizations have spent millions to increase the ranks of black science students.

"It's not just a Duke issue. It's a national issue," he said.

The researchers analyzed data from surveys of more than 1,500 Duke students before college and during the first, second and fourth college years. Blacks and Whites initially expressed a similar interest in tougher fields of study such as science and engineering, but 68 percent of blacks ultimately choose humanities and social science majors, compared with less than 55 percent of Whites. The research found similar trends for legacy students –those whose parents are alumni.

The study's claim that majors such as natural sciences required more study time was based on students' responses to survey questions about how many hours they spent each week on studying and homework. The study found that those fields required 50 percent more study time than social sciences and humanities courses.

"I view the lack of (minority) representation in the sciences to be a problem, and I include my own field of economics," Arcidiacono said. "I'd like to see programs that are successful in increasing that representation."

Black students at Duke haven't taken that impression from the study, which came to light when the Chronicle of Higher Education wrote about it earlier this month. Affirmative action opponents cite the study in briefs involving a challenge of the undergraduate admissions policy at the University of Texas at Austin.

"What kind of image does this present not only of the academic undertakings of black students at Duke, but also of the merit and legitimacy of our degrees?" Asante asked. "And then, of course, it's calling into question ... the legitimacy of how we even got to Duke in the first place."

Duke, a private university, has about 6,500 undergraduate students, about 47 percent of them white and 10 percent black. The largest group of minorities is Asian-American at 21 percent. Duke has no set formula for admitting students, school spokesman Mike Schoenfeld said. Instead, the admissions process takes into account many factors, including race, ethnicity and legacy status. The school selects about 1,700 students each year from more than 31,000 applicants.

"The experience of black students, and indeed of all students, at Duke is of deep and ongoing interest to the university, and we take very seriously the issues that have been raised," Schoenfeld said.

The study is the latest issue to trouble black students at Duke, Asante said. She said administrators have not responded to questions about plans to renovate the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture and have not given support for the black student group's recruitment weekend.

Schoenfeld said the Williams Center is a gem and officials are working with students to find a new, visible location for it. And he said the recruitment weekend is more important than ever because Duke received a record number of black student applications this year.

But a letter to the editor of the student newspaper, signed by the provost and other administrators, failed to address concerns about those issues and the racial climate, Asante said.

"In failing to do that, it reaffirmed its own ignorance in terms of the necessity of acknowledging, accepting and working to change that climate," Asante said.



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