09-22-2019  1:42 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon is One of 23 States to Sue Trump on Air Quality Rules

The Trump administration has revoked California's right to set auto emission rules: let battle commence...

New Treasurer Steps In At Multnomah Dems

Self-described ‘boring guy’ Dean Price steps in amid party tensions

Governor's Lawyer Declines Court Nod Amid Uproar

Misha Isaak has declined his appointment by Gov. Kate Brown to the Court of Appeals after the state's public records advocate accused him of unethical behavior

NEWS BRIEFS

Mac Group Returns to GFO Sept. 25

User group to cover email, iCloud and more ...

Johnell Bell Named to National Small Business Leadership Council

Portland small business owner joins National Economic Development Association ...

Buffalo Soldier Dedication to Be Held at Fort Vancouver on Saturday, Sept. 21

The installation will be the first African-American memorial in the city of Vancouver ...

Africa-America Institute Set to Honor Angola, New York Times Magazine, and Netflix Film During 35th Annual Awards Gala

New York City’s premiere Africa event takes place during the week of the United Nations General Assembly’s 73rd session. ...

YouTube Originals Debuts Michelle Obama’s Reacher College Prep Course

‘A Student’s Guide to Your First Year of College’ debuted last week ...

University study says wind turbines threaten migrating bats

BEND, Ore. (AP) — A Pacific Northwest bat that that migrates south for the winter faces a serious threat from wind turbines, according to a study by the by Oregon State University-Cascades.The study concludes that the hoary bat faces an uncertain future because its numbers have declined by...

Army Corps awards Columbia River jetty repair contract

ASTORIA, Ore. (AP) — The federal government has awarded a 0 million contract for repair of a jetty that protects the mouth of the Columbia River.The Astorian reports heavy marine contractor J.E. McAmis was awarded the contract to repair the South Jetty over five years.The company will...

Studious Garrett helps Missouri rout South Carolina

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — As Missouri senior linebacker Cale Garrett prepared to answer reporters' questions after a 34-14 victory over South Carolina on Saturday, he reached for the remote control clicker on the table in front of him in the Tigers' meeting room. For a football film buff, it's a...

Missouri uses opportunistic defense to beat South Carolina

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri's defense scored the easy way and the hard way as the Tigers beat South Carolina 34-14 on Saturday.Linebacker Cale Garrett recovered a fumble in the end zone for a touchdown and safety Ronnell Perkins returned an interception 100 yards for another score for the...

OPINION

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

Despite U.S. Open Loss, Serena Williams Is Still the Greatest of All Time

Serena Williams lost her bid for what would have been her sixth U.S. Open Singles title ...

Do Black Kids Deserve This Treatment in School?

Three White Pearland ISD employees are named in a federal lawsuit after humiliating a 13-year-old Black student by blackening his scalp with a Sharpie ...

Why I’m Visiting the Border

People of color are feeling less safe today and any day when we see the realities of domestic terrorism and racially-motivated acts of violence ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

FIFA president: Racism in Italian stadiums 'very serious'

PARMA, Italy (AP) — FIFA president Gianni Infantino labeled the situation of racism inside Italian soccer stadiums "very serious" following the latest incident of offensive chants.A 2-2 draw between Atalanta and Fiorentina on Sunday was suspended briefly during the first half due to racist...

Pompeo: Resist China's demands to repatriate fleeing Uighurs

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — America's top diplomat says Central Asian nations should reject Chinese demands to repatriate ethnic minorities to China, where they face repression.Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (pahm-PAY'-oh) says Beijing's detention of Uighur (WEE'-gur) Muslims in western China has...

'Everybody cries here': Hope and despair in Mexican shelter

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AP) — Long after midnight, when the heat has finally relented and the walled courtyard is scattered with men sleeping in the open, someone begins to sob.The sound is quiet, muffled. The only light comes from streetlights shimmering above the razor wire. It's impossible...

ENTERTAINMENT

25 years later, a new generation gets immersed in 'Friends'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Friends" is getting old. Its fans have never been younger.As the sitcom about six twentysomethings marks its 25th anniversary on Sunday, it has spawned a devoted youthful viewership, especially among tween and teen girls who weren't yet born when it went off the air in...

Holy anniversary! Displays of bat signal fete Batman at 80

NEW YORK (AP) — It's no joker. The night is lighting up Saturday around the world with the famous bat signal to mark a special anniversary for Batman.DC Comics is carrying off a celebration of Batman Day to mark the 80th anniversary of the appearance of crimefighter Bruce Wayne and his...

Emmy nominees getting ready for Sunday's big night

LOS ANGELES (AP) — This is the time of year when the cast of HBO's "Veep" would usually be shooting a new season. Now that the show is done, actor Tony Hale says they'll have to settle for getting together at the Emmy Awards."Obviously, a win would be so much fun," Hale said at Friday...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

In cryptic tweet, Antonio Brown appears to retire from NFL

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Antonio Brown says he is finished with the NFL.In a Twitter rant on the morning...

AP Top 25: Wisconsin into top 10; Cal makes big move to 15

Wisconsin moved into the top 10 for the first time this season, landing at No. 8 in The Associated Press college...

House retiree: Toxic politics, Trump White House, bad knees

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Paul Cook served 26 years as a Marine and was awarded two Purple Heart medals for...

Pompeo: Resist China's demands to repatriate fleeing Uighurs

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — America's top diplomat says Central Asian nations should reject Chinese demands to...

Travel firm Thomas Cook teeters on edge as talks continue

LONDON (AP) — More than 600,000 vacationers who booked through tour operator Thomas Cook were on edge...

World leaders feel the heat in upcoming climate summit

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn't...

McMenamins
By Martha Waggoner of the Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)— An unpublished study by Duke University researchers that says black students are more likely to switch to less difficult majors has upset some students, who say the research is emblematic of more entrenched racial problems.

The study, which opponents of affirmative action are using in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider, concludes black students match the GPA of Whites over time partially because they switch to majors that require less study time and have less stringent grading standards. Opponents of affirmative action cite the study in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider.

About three dozen students held a silent protest Sunday outside a speech by black political strategist Donna Brazile that was part of the school's annual Martin Luther King Jr. observance. And members of the Black Student Alliance have met with the provost to express their unhappiness with the study and other issues on campus.

"I don't know what needs to happen to make Duke wake up," said Nana Asante, a senior psychology major and president of the Black Student Alliance.

The reaction from black students has surprised one of the researchers, who said he wanted to show the need to find ways to keep minorities in difficult majors such as the natural sciences, economics and engineering.

Peter Arcidiacono, an economics professor at Duke, wrote the paper in May 2011 along with a graduate student and Ken Spenner, a sociology professor. Spenner and Arcidiacono are white. It's been under review since June at the Journal of Public Economics.

The statistics would likely reflect trends at other schools, Arcidiacono said. The study notes that national science organizations have spent millions to increase the ranks of black science students.

"It's not just a Duke issue. It's a national issue," he said.

The researchers analyzed data from surveys of more than 1,500 Duke students before college and during the first, second and fourth college years. Blacks and Whites initially expressed a similar interest in tougher fields of study such as science and engineering, but 68 percent of blacks ultimately choose humanities and social science majors, compared with less than 55 percent of Whites. The research found similar trends for legacy students –those whose parents are alumni.

The study's claim that majors such as natural sciences required more study time was based on students' responses to survey questions about how many hours they spent each week on studying and homework. The study found that those fields required 50 percent more study time than social sciences and humanities courses.

"I view the lack of (minority) representation in the sciences to be a problem, and I include my own field of economics," Arcidiacono said. "I'd like to see programs that are successful in increasing that representation."

Black students at Duke haven't taken that impression from the study, which came to light when the Chronicle of Higher Education wrote about it earlier this month. Affirmative action opponents cite the study in briefs involving a challenge of the undergraduate admissions policy at the University of Texas at Austin.

"What kind of image does this present not only of the academic undertakings of black students at Duke, but also of the merit and legitimacy of our degrees?" Asante asked. "And then, of course, it's calling into question ... the legitimacy of how we even got to Duke in the first place."

Duke, a private university, has about 6,500 undergraduate students, about 47 percent of them white and 10 percent black. The largest group of minorities is Asian-American at 21 percent. Duke has no set formula for admitting students, school spokesman Mike Schoenfeld said. Instead, the admissions process takes into account many factors, including race, ethnicity and legacy status. The school selects about 1,700 students each year from more than 31,000 applicants.

"The experience of black students, and indeed of all students, at Duke is of deep and ongoing interest to the university, and we take very seriously the issues that have been raised," Schoenfeld said.

The study is the latest issue to trouble black students at Duke, Asante said. She said administrators have not responded to questions about plans to renovate the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture and have not given support for the black student group's recruitment weekend.

Schoenfeld said the Williams Center is a gem and officials are working with students to find a new, visible location for it. And he said the recruitment weekend is more important than ever because Duke received a record number of black student applications this year.

But a letter to the editor of the student newspaper, signed by the provost and other administrators, failed to address concerns about those issues and the racial climate, Asante said.

"In failing to do that, it reaffirmed its own ignorance in terms of the necessity of acknowledging, accepting and working to change that climate," Asante said.



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