02-26-2020  12:06 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

'A World of Hurt': 39 States to Investigate JUUL's Marketing

Oregon is one of five states leading a bipartisan coalition looking into JUUL’s targeting of youth vaping

US Appeals Court Upholds Trump Rules Involving Abortions

The 7-4 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned decisions issued by judges in Washington, Oregon and California

Jeremy Christian Guilty of Killing 2 Who Tried to Stop His Slurs on Max

Today jurors found Christian guilty of the May 26, 2017 stabbing deaths of Taliesin Namkai-Meche and Ricky Best

States Step Up Funding for Planned Parenthood Clinics

A spokesman for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon said the agency has been "working closely with state officials to create critical backstops and protect access to care for all Oregonians who need it, regardless of federal action on Title X"

NEWS BRIEFS

State and Federal Agencies Aid Sunken Tugboat in Columbia River

Divers plugged fuel vents this afternoon and the vessel is not actively leaking ...

Multnomah County Promotes Voter Education Project

Multnomah County is partnering with National Association of Secretary of States (NASS) to promote #TRUSTEDINFO2020 ...

New Travel Ban Takes Effect, National Groups Respond

The expansion of the Muslim ban targets more Black immigrants ...

Harris, Booker Applaud House For Announcing Vote on Anti-Lynching Legislation

After passing the House, the bill will head to the president’s desk to be signed into law ...

Laugh Yourself Clean Recovery Comedy Show to be Held March 20 in Portland

Featuring Pacific Northwest comedians, the show will be held at the Clinton Street Theater ...

Pendleton gets jumi.8M emergency loan for flood-damaged levee

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The city of Pendleton will get a jumi.8 million through an emergency loan for repairs to a critical levee damaged by massive flooding in northeast Oregon earlier this month in hopes the structure can be fixed before the spring snowmelt, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said...

0M homelessness tax measure on Portland-area May ballot

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The regional government that oversees three counties in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area has voted to refer a ballot measure to voters this May that would raise 0 million a year to address chronic homelessness in the region.The government entity, Metro, voted...

OPINION

Black America is Facing a Housing Crisis

As the cost of housing soars the homeless population jumps 12 percent, the number of people renting grows and homeownership falls ...

Trump Expands Muslim Ban to Target Africans

Under the new ban on countries, four out of five people who will be excluded are Africans ...

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Campaign to open Trump community centers to woo black voters

WASHINGTON (AP) — Flush with cash, President Donald Trump's campaign is stepping up its outreach to black Americans as it tries to claw away support from the traditionally Democratic voting bloc ahead of November's general election.Trump's campaign is announcing Wednesday that it is opening...

Ole Miss apologizes to black protesters arrested in 1970

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — The University of Mississippi has apologized to dozens of African Americans who were arrested in 1970 for protesting racial inequality on the mostly white campus where Confederate images were a deeply ingrained part of campus culture.“I am sorry it took us 50...

The Latest: Sanders plans rally in Klobuchar's home state

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — The Latest on the Democratic presidential primary contest (all times local):2:45 p.m.After taking aim at 2020 rival Elizabeth Warren’s home state, Bernie Sanders is doing the same to Amy Klobuchar’s.The Vermont senator’s presidential...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: An unlikely friendship is at the heart of 'Burden'

It was only a matter of time before Hollywood came calling to adapt the real-life events surrounding a museum in South Carolina that celebrated the Ku Klux Klan.The museum opened in the mid-1990s, prompting protests. One of the Klansmen eventually had a change of heart and hands the deed to the...

Jude Law among narrators of 'Beedle the Bard' audiobook

NEW YORK (AP) — Jude Law, Warwick Davis and Evanna Lynch are among the readers in an all-star recording of J.K. Rowling's “The Tales of Beedle the Bard," the first time her Harry Potter spinoff has been available as an audiobook.Audible, the audiobook producer and distributor,...

ABC's 'For Life' hopes to change the way we see network TV

NEW YORK (AP) — Actor Nicholas Pinnock doesn't just believe his new network TV show can save lives. He believes it can save network TV, too.Pinnock stars in “For Life,” ABC's mid-season drama about a prison inmate unjustly incarcerated who becomes a lawyer. Social justice...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Stocks slide on Wall Street, extending steep drops this week

U.S. stocks shed the modest gains they had made in early trading and veered mostly lower in Wednesday afternoon,...

Sharapova retires from tennis at age 32 with 5 Slam titles

Maria Sharapova was a transcendent star in tennis from the time she was a teenager, someone whose grit and...

Congress makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after Till

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has...

Egypt holds full-honors military funeral for Mubarak

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt held a full-honors military funeral Wednesday for the country's former autocratic...

Death toll rises to 24 from Delhi riots during Trump trip

NEW DELHI (AP) — At least 24 people were killed and 189 injured in three days of clashes in New Delhi that...

Virus fears keep guests trapped in sunny 'luxurious prison'

MADRID (AP) — They signed up for a bit of a beach holiday to break up the winter. Instead, hundreds of...

McMenamins
By Martha Waggoner of the Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)— An unpublished study by Duke University researchers that says black students are more likely to switch to less difficult majors has upset some students, who say the research is emblematic of more entrenched racial problems.

The study, which opponents of affirmative action are using in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider, concludes black students match the GPA of Whites over time partially because they switch to majors that require less study time and have less stringent grading standards. Opponents of affirmative action cite the study in a case they want the U.S. Supreme Court to consider.

About three dozen students held a silent protest Sunday outside a speech by black political strategist Donna Brazile that was part of the school's annual Martin Luther King Jr. observance. And members of the Black Student Alliance have met with the provost to express their unhappiness with the study and other issues on campus.

"I don't know what needs to happen to make Duke wake up," said Nana Asante, a senior psychology major and president of the Black Student Alliance.

The reaction from black students has surprised one of the researchers, who said he wanted to show the need to find ways to keep minorities in difficult majors such as the natural sciences, economics and engineering.

Peter Arcidiacono, an economics professor at Duke, wrote the paper in May 2011 along with a graduate student and Ken Spenner, a sociology professor. Spenner and Arcidiacono are white. It's been under review since June at the Journal of Public Economics.

The statistics would likely reflect trends at other schools, Arcidiacono said. The study notes that national science organizations have spent millions to increase the ranks of black science students.

"It's not just a Duke issue. It's a national issue," he said.

The researchers analyzed data from surveys of more than 1,500 Duke students before college and during the first, second and fourth college years. Blacks and Whites initially expressed a similar interest in tougher fields of study such as science and engineering, but 68 percent of blacks ultimately choose humanities and social science majors, compared with less than 55 percent of Whites. The research found similar trends for legacy students –those whose parents are alumni.

The study's claim that majors such as natural sciences required more study time was based on students' responses to survey questions about how many hours they spent each week on studying and homework. The study found that those fields required 50 percent more study time than social sciences and humanities courses.

"I view the lack of (minority) representation in the sciences to be a problem, and I include my own field of economics," Arcidiacono said. "I'd like to see programs that are successful in increasing that representation."

Black students at Duke haven't taken that impression from the study, which came to light when the Chronicle of Higher Education wrote about it earlier this month. Affirmative action opponents cite the study in briefs involving a challenge of the undergraduate admissions policy at the University of Texas at Austin.

"What kind of image does this present not only of the academic undertakings of black students at Duke, but also of the merit and legitimacy of our degrees?" Asante asked. "And then, of course, it's calling into question ... the legitimacy of how we even got to Duke in the first place."

Duke, a private university, has about 6,500 undergraduate students, about 47 percent of them white and 10 percent black. The largest group of minorities is Asian-American at 21 percent. Duke has no set formula for admitting students, school spokesman Mike Schoenfeld said. Instead, the admissions process takes into account many factors, including race, ethnicity and legacy status. The school selects about 1,700 students each year from more than 31,000 applicants.

"The experience of black students, and indeed of all students, at Duke is of deep and ongoing interest to the university, and we take very seriously the issues that have been raised," Schoenfeld said.

The study is the latest issue to trouble black students at Duke, Asante said. She said administrators have not responded to questions about plans to renovate the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture and have not given support for the black student group's recruitment weekend.

Schoenfeld said the Williams Center is a gem and officials are working with students to find a new, visible location for it. And he said the recruitment weekend is more important than ever because Duke received a record number of black student applications this year.

But a letter to the editor of the student newspaper, signed by the provost and other administrators, failed to address concerns about those issues and the racial climate, Asante said.

"In failing to do that, it reaffirmed its own ignorance in terms of the necessity of acknowledging, accepting and working to change that climate," Asante said.



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