05-19-2022  11:39 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Blurry Ballot Barcodes Delay Oregon House Primary Results

Election officials in Oregon's third-largest county scrambled to tally tens of thousands of ballots with blurry barcodes that were being rejected by vote-counting machines.

Oregon Primaries Set Up Competitive Governor's Race

Former Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek won the Democratic nomination for Oregon governor Tuesday.

Multnomah County Elects First Female Sheriff

Current Undersheriff Nicole Morrisey O’Donnell, a 26-year veteran of the agency, handily won the top job with two-thirds of the vote

Election Day-Ballots Need to be Dropped Off or Postmarked Before 8 P.M.

Today, May 17, 2022, is the last day to vote in the Primary Election. Voted ballots must be received at any county elections office in Oregon or Official Ballot Drop Site location tonight by 8 p.m., or mailed and postmarked by May 17, 2022 to be counted.

NEWS BRIEFS

Local Podcast Wins Awards at Home and Abroad

Let’s Talk About Race is a production of Grassroot News NW and KBOO Community Radio. ...

Multnomah County Planning Commission Seeks New Member

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WA Childhood Immunization Rates Decline During Pandemic

Immunization rates have decreased by 13% in 2021 when compared to pre-pandemic level ...

Attorney General Rosenblum Warns Against Price Gouging of Baby Formula

This declaration will allow the Oregon Attorney General to take action against any business, or online vendor, who upsells the price...

Abortion-friendly states prep for more patients if Roe falls

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Leaders of a Tennessee abortion clinic calculated driving distances and studied passenger rail routes as they scanned the map for another place to offer services if the U.S. Supreme Court lets states restrict or eliminate abortion rights. They chose Carbondale...

Police: Boy shoots older brother inside family apartment

FEDERAL WAY, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say an 8-year-old boy shot his 9-year-old brother while handling a handgun inside the family's apartment in Federal Way, Washington. KOMO reports police are investigating the shooting, which occurred just before 8 a.m. Thursday at a multi-family...

OPINION

Can Federal Lynching Law Help Heal America?

Despite decades of senseless delays, this new law pushes America to finally acknowledge that racism often correlates to a level of violence and terror woven into the very fabric of this country. ...

The Skanner News Endorsements: May Primary 2022

Primary election day is May 17, 2022. Read The Skanner's endorsements for this important election. ...

Men’s Voices Urgently Needed to Defend Reproductive Rights

For decades, men in increasing numbers have followed women’s lead in challenging gender-based violence and promoting gender equality, so why are we stuck when it comes to abortion? ...

Burying Black Cemeteries: Off the Record

It is a tragedy when we lose a loved one. That tragedy is compounded when are unable to visit their final resting place to honor and remember them. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Minority GM, coach candidates invited to meet NFL owners

Something wasn't working. Even though the NFL attempted to enhance opportunities for minority candidates to become head coaches in a league whose players are 70% Black, there was a disconnect. Same thing for front office positions, although more improvement had been seen in recent...

New York's hasty redistricting rewrite draws ire of locals

NEW YORK (AP) — New Yorkers pride themselves on the dynamism of their metropolis, where it can feel totally different on the next block, where tourists walking in Chinatown quickly find themselves in Little Italy, where a neighborhood can be a proxy for a lifestyle or worldview. ...

Cancer deaths in Black people drop; still higher than others

Cancer death rates have steadily declined among Black people but remain higher than in other racial and ethnic groups, a U.S. government study released Thursday shows. Cancer deaths have been dropping for all Americans for the past two decades because of lower smoking rates and...

ENTERTAINMENT

Chris Wallace interview show to be featured on CNN Sundays

NEW YORK (AP) — Chris Wallace will host a Sunday night interview show for CNN starting this fall, the network said Wednesday in announcing a new home for the best-known personality from the since-imploded CNN+ streaming service. “Who's Talking to Chris Wallace,” which will also...

Review: Hollywood comes to Downton Abbey! Also: the clothes.

One wedding and a funeral — and a birth. That gorgeous house, never mind the leaky roof. Some sunshine, too! More bone-dry quips from Maggie Smith. And oh, the clothes — silks and satins, tulles and tiaras. What could go wrong? Why, nothing, of course! Would YOU mess with the...

Elton John doc ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’ lands at Disney

Sir Elton John is preparing to say goodbye in fabulous splendor, with the help of a documentary crew and the Walt Disney Co. Disney Original Documentary and Disney+ said Wednesday that the film, entitled “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road: The Final Elton John Performances and the Years...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Tea and infomercials: N. Korea fights COVID with few tools

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — On a recent nighttime visit to a drugstore, a double-masked Kim Jong Un lamented the...

Cancer deaths in Black people drop; still higher than others

Cancer death rates have steadily declined among Black people but remain higher than in other racial and ethnic...

New Twitter policy aims to pierce fog of war misinformation

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter is stepping up its fight against misinformation with a new policy cracking down on...

Germany: 1 person wounded, 1 detained in school attack

BERLIN (AP) — A school employee was seriously wounded by an assailant wielding a crossbow in an attack Thursday...

Spain confirms 7 monkeypox cases as European outbreak grows

MADRID (AP) — Health officials in Spain reported seven cases of monkeypox and Portugal updated its number of...

'Wagatha Christie' libel lawyer says evidence was destroyed

LONDON (AP) — A high-profile libel court battle between two British soccer spouses concluded Thursday, with one...

By Cain Burdeau and Michael Kunzelman of the Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS (AP) –Gray skies couldn't dampen the spirit as Mardi Gras revelers partied on Fat Tuesday in waves of parading, costuming, drinking –and political commentary.

Some bared flesh and threw beads on Bourbon Street in the French Quarter, while others wore costumes lampooning the BP oil spill or other headline-grabbing events. Overall, this year's Carnival season has been among the most raucous since Hurricane Katrina, partly because it overlaps with many colleges' spring breaks.

Clarinetist Pete Fountain kicked off street parading shortly after dawn with his marching group. The traditionally African-American Krewe of Zulu and the parade of Rex, King of Carnival, followed. Mayor Mitch Landrieu led Zulu on horseback before dismounting at the antebellum-columned Gallier Hall for champagne toasts with Mardi Gras royalty.

The party would go on until midnight, when Carnival is replaced by the Christian season of Lent.

For many, the fun came in watching costumed partiers – and their themes.

A troupe of black-clad skeletons known as a Bone Gang paraded through the streets in a tradition dating from the 1800s that has voodoo overtones.

"The idea is it's kind of a warning for people in the neighborhoods, for the children in particular, to live right because we're all going to die,'' said Michael Crutcher, a Bone Gang member and college instructor.

In the Treme neighborhood, Ashley Scharfenstein, 24, dressed as a peacock with a black corset. She was jiving to the music at the street party, then strolled off to the French Quarter.

"Wherever the music takes us, we're going,'' she said.

Other costumed groups added political barbs to their revelry.

In Bywater, walking clubs gathered for the annual saunter to the Quarter known as the St. Anne's parade.

"This is what Mardi Gras is all about, lampooning,'' said Pat Kent, a retired hospital executive clad as a gun-toting priest. He and a friend were going as the "krewe of guns in church.''

"Today I'm packing for Jesus,'' he said. Kent said his costume was in protest of a new Louisiana law allowing people to carry weapons in church.

Nearby, the occasional clown, a Moammar Ghadafi lookalike, women in flowing dresses and a Roman soldier gathered.

In the French Quarter, satire was in bloom as maskers took aim at last year's BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Allen Logue, 58, was clad as a one-man oil spill clean-up crew. The oil field consultant from Barataria, La., didn't have to do much shopping to build his costume. He already had a hard-hat helmet and BP-branded sweat shirt from work he did for the company in Alaska.

"The only thing I had to shop for was the Jim Beam and that was to ease the pain of the oil spill,'' Logue said.

Logue also carried super-absorbent kitchen napkins to clean any mess he might encounter, though the most likely spill on Bourbon Street would be beer and not crude oil.

For Paul and Amy Maudive of Long Beach, Calif., coming to Mardi Gras has been a tradition since 1976. Each year they dress in an Elvis-themed costume. After Hurricane Katrina they wrapped themselves in the blue tarps that covered so many blown-away rooftops, and last year they billed themselves as Elvitar, in tribute to the movie "Avatar.''

This year, they were all oil spill.

Dressed in oil-stained jumpsuits with Elvis-style capes, they'd glued plastic birds and crabs to their costumes.

Sylvia Beyer, 57, of New Orleans led a group of 5 women in grass skirts and hats with the BP logo. On the back of their shirts were slogans, such as Broken Promises, Brazen Polluters and Bloody Pathetic. As they walked along, they passed out makeshift voodoo dolls with a photo of former BP CEO Tony Hayward pasted to each.

"We just wanted to stick it to BP. We put more time into these costumes than BP did in their disaster plan,'' Beyer said.

Hal and Sharon Moser of New Orleans mocked the new national healthcare program with their outfits. Hal Moser strolled along Bourbon Street dressed in a hospital gown with bloody bandages and a fake ax pasted to his head. "I've got a split-open headache from it,'' Moser said. His wife dressed as a nurse.

The Transportation Security Administration also took hits. One group outfitted as TSA inspectors carried signs referring to body cavity searches.

John Chapman of Mandeville, La., tried a different approach. He dressed as a Chilean miner, complete with an escape pod attached to his back.

Locals were in a triumphant mood, and not without reason.

New Orleans – America's poster child of disaster –has come a long way since Hurricane Katrina. Its beloved New Orleans Saints won the Super Bowl last year and it has largely overcome the disaster of the BP oil spill.

This year, the timing of Mardi Gras helped. It fell later than usual and coincides with spring break for college students. Students have been out in force –giving more punch to the annual pre-Lenten celebration.

Two friends on spring break from Wilmington College made a 12-hour drive from Ohio.

Garret Lingoe, 21, a junior, clutched a beer at midmorning Tuesday as he talked in awe of Mardi Gras. "I didn't know I was coming here until about 5 days ago and I'm sure happy I did.''

Seth Howard, a 23-year-old senior, echoed his sentiments. "Everybody down here is just so nice and laid back.''

Ali Miller, 23, an early childhood education major at Southeastern Louisiana University, was jubilant as she walked Tuesday morning after a long night of drinking in the French Quarter.

"There is nothing like New Orleans,'' she said. "I would never ever want to grow up anywhere but here! And Mardi Gras is the craziest time you could ever have in life – I don't know what else to say.''

Mardi Gras was being celebrated across the Gulf Coast, in cities including Mobile, Ala., and Biloxi, Miss. In the Cajun country of southwest Louisiana, masked riders on horseback continued the tradition of riding from town to town making merry along the way.



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