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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Inmates Sue Over COVID-19 Response

The suit asks a judge to mandate a social distance of 6 feet or more between inmates

Oregon Health Officer: Spike in Virus Cases Can Be Averted

Modeling shows the state won't see a huge rise in cases as long as stay-at-home orders are heeded

Latest COVID-19 Projections Encouraging With Social Distancing

Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May

Five Metro Council Candidates Discuss Equity

District 5 candidates compete for open seat

NEWS BRIEFS

OnPoint Community Credit Union Donates $100,000 to De La Salle North Catholic High School

OnPoint’s contribution comes at a critical time for school’s expansion project ...

Civil Rights Group, Medical Professionals Call on Trump Administration and States to Release Racial Data for COVID-19 Tests, Cases and Outcomes

This call to action is driven by concern that the lack of transparency by federal and state officials is preventing public health...

Oregon Zoo Launches Live Video and Learning Activities Resource

The new project provides educational and entertaining activities for kids and animal lovers ...

National Civil Rights Group Responds to Repeal of Discriminatory Tennessee Voter Registration Law

The provisions included in a 2019 law sought to impose criminal penalties and fines on groups and...

Cryptosporidium Found in Portland Water

People who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed are advised to ask their doctor about...

Oregon inmates sue over COVID-19 response

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A group of inmates concerned about contracting COVID-19 filed a lawsuit Monday against Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and the leaders at the Department of Corrections.The civil rights lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court by the Oregon Justice Resource Center on behalf of the...

California lends 500 ventilators to 4 states, 2 territories

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The White House said Monday that 500 ventilators on loan from California will be shipped to Nevada, Maryland, Delaware, the District of Columbia, the Northern Mariana Islands and Guam as the nation faces a crush of coronavirus-related hospitalizations. California...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

You're Pretty... For a Dark-Skinned Girl

Cloé Luv, an "unapologetically" dark-skinned Black woman tells her story ...

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

What the Government Can Do Now to Lessen the Impact of COVID-19

Dr. Roger Stark says during this pandemic the administration must give states more flexibility ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Earl Graves Sr., who championed black businesses as the founder of the first African American-owned magazine focusing on black entrepreneurs, has died. He was 85. Graves died Monday after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease, his son, Earl “Butch”...

Tasked with schoolwork help, many US parents lack English

Since her daughters' school closed for the coronavirus outbreak, Mariana Luna has been thrust into the role of their primary educator, like millions of parents across the U.S. But each day, before she can go over their schoolwork, her 9-year-old first has to help her understand what the assignments...

John Lewis, once Trump target, backs Joe Biden for president

ATLANTA (AP) — Civil rights icon and Georgia Rep. John Lewis is backing Joe Biden for president, giving the prospective Democratic nominee perhaps his biggest symbolic endorsement among the many veteran black lawmakers who back his candidacy. “We need his voice,” the...

ENTERTAINMENT

O'Hara says 'Schitt's Creek' went beyond her expectations

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In Moira Rose, Catherine O’Hara has created a character that will arguably go down as one of the best in TV history. Even though Moira lost her fortune and lives in a roadside motel in a town called Schitt’s Creek, the former soap opera star is always dressed...

'Modern Family' cast shares memories as series finale nears

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The group crying began after the final scene of the last episode of ABC’s “Modern Family” was taped — with the notable exception of Ed O’Neill, who plays patriarch Jay Pritchett.“I said, ‘No tears?’” recalled...

Beloved 'Schitt's Creek' ending at its peak

LOS ANGELES (AP) — After five years on TV, it seemed like “Schitt’s Creek” was just starting to hit its stride.The critically acclaimed comedy — about a shallow, filthy rich family who lose their fortune and are forced to live in a small town they bought as a joke...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Rio firefighter trades hose for horn to extinguish the blues

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Decked out in full firefighting gear, Elielson Silva stands 150 feet above the ground...

Hackers' new target during pandemic: video conference calls

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ceri Weber had just begun to defend her dissertation when the chaos began: Echoes and...

Tasked with schoolwork help, many US parents lack English

Since her daughters' school closed for the coronavirus outbreak, Mariana Luna has been thrust into the role of...

Wuhan farmers struggle as crops wither from travel limits

HUANGPI, China (AP) — Stuck in the same bind as many other Chinese farmers whose crops are rotting in their...

Rwandans mark genocide anniversary under nationwide lockdown

KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — For Augustine Ngabonziza, a survivor of Rwanda’s genocide, it’s...

66 at South African hospital have coronavirus, mostly staff

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Sixty-six people at a single hospital in South Africa have tested positive for the...

McMenamins
By The Skanner News

Americans' differences in income, race/ethnicity, gender and other social attributes make a difference in how likely they are to be healthy, sick, or die prematurely, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For instance, state-level estimates in 2007 indicate that low income residents report five to 11 fewer healthy days per month than do high income residents, the report says. It also says men are nearly four times more likely than women to commit suicide, that adolescent birth rates for Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks are three and 2.5 times respectively those of whites, and that the prevalence of binge drinking is higher in people with higher incomes.

The data are in the new "CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011," released Thursday.

The report underscores the need for more consistent, nationally representative data on disability status and sexual orientation.

"Better information about the health status of different groups is essential to improve health," said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. "This first of its kind analysis and reporting of recent trends is designed to spur action and accountability at the federal, tribal, state and local levels to achieve health equity in this country."

The report, the first of a series of consolidated assessments, highlights health disparities by sex, race and ethnicity, income, education, disability status and other social characteristics. Substantial progress in improving health for most U.S. residents has been made in recent years, yet persistent disparities continue.

Released as a supplement to CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the report addresses disparities at the national level in health care access, exposure to environmental hazards, mortality, morbidity, behavioral risk factors, disability status and social determinants of health – the conditions in which people are born, grow, live and work.

Findings from the report's 22 essays include:

In 2007, non-Hispanic white men (21.5 per 100,000 population) were two to three times more likely to die in motor vehicle crashes than were non-Hispanic white women (8.8 per 100,000). The gender difference was similar in other race/ethnic groups.

In 2007, men (18.4 per 100,000) of all ages and races/ethnicities were approximately four times more likely to die by suicide than females (4.8 per 100,000).

In 2007, rates of drug-induced deaths were highest among non-Hispanic whites (15.1 per 100,000) and lowest among Asian/Pacific Islanders (2.0 per 100,000).

Hypertension is by far most prevalent among non-Hispanic blacks (42 percent vs. 29 percent among whites), while levels of control are lowest for Mexican-Americans (31.8 percent versus 46.5 percent among non-Hispanic whites).

Rates of preventable hospitalizations increase as incomes decrease. Data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality indicate that eliminating these disparities would prevent approximately 1 million hospitalizations and save $6.7 billion in health care costs each year.

Rates of adolescent pregnancy and childbirth have been falling or holding steady for all racial/ethnic minorities in all age groups. However, in 2008, disparities persist as birth rates for Hispanic adolescents (77.4 per 1,000 females) and non-Hispanic black adolescents (62.9 per 1,000 females) were three and 2.5 times those of whites (26.7 per 1,000 females), respectively.

In 2009, the prevalence of binge drinking was higher in groups with incomes of $50,000 or above (18.5 percent) compared to those with incomes of $15,000 or less (12.1 percent); and in college graduates (17.4 percent), compared to those with less than high school education (12.5 percent). However, people who binge drink and have less than $15,000 income binge drink more frequently (4.9 versus 3.6 episodes) and, when they do binge drink, drink more heavily (7.1 versus 6.5 drinks).

The report supports the Healthy People 2020 goals and the forthcoming National Partnership for Action (NPA) to End Health Disparities. The report also complements the upcoming AHRQ National Healthcare Disparities Report and underscores the need to connect those working in clinical care and public health, especially at the local level.

"CDC publishes this report today not only to address gaps in health between populations in our country but also to begin to measure progress in years to come in reducing these gaps and inequities going forward," said Leandris Liburd, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.A., recently appointed director of CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity. Dr. Liburd will provide leadership for the office and CDC's public health programs, policies, surveillance and research efforts in achieving health equity.

The full "CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011", is available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr.

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