12-02-2022  4:34 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tough Oregon Gun Law Faces Legal Challenge, Could Be Delayed

Midterm voters narrowly passed one of the toughest gun control laws in the nation, but the new permit-to-purchase mandate and ban on high-capacity magazines faces a lawsuit that could put it on ice just days before it's set to take effect.

Portland Approves $27M for New Homeless Camps

Public opposition to the measure and the money that will fund it has been heated, with critics saying it will criminalize homelessness and fail to address its root causes.

Portland Settles Lawsuit Over Police Use of Tear Gas

The lawsuit was originally filed by Don't Shoot Portland in June 2020. “Our freedom of expression is the foundation of how we make social change possible,” Teressa Raiford said in a news release. “Black Lives Still Matter.”

Oregon Lawmakers Lift Security Measure Imposed on Senator

Since July 2019, Sen. Brian Boquist had been required to give 12 hours notice before coming to the Oregon State Capitol, to give the state police time to bolster their security and to ensure the safety of people in the Capitol.

NEWS BRIEFS

The James Museum Opens Black Pioneers: Legacy In The American West

This first-of-its-kind-exhibition explores Black history in the West with a timeline of pictorial quilts. ...

Use of Deadly Force Investigation Involving Clackamas County Sheriff and Oregon State Police Concludes

The grand jury’s role was solely to determine whether the involved officers’ conduct warranted criminal charges; questions...

Oregon Faces Snow-Plow Driver Shortage Heading Into Winter

New federal licensing rules for drivers resulted in longer wait times to obtain a commercial driver's license, which contributed to...

7 die from flu in Washington state, activity 'very high'

SEATTLE (AP) — Flu activity in the state is now considered very high, according to the Washington State Department of Health. State health officials on Thursday reported over 1,200 new flu cases from Nov. 13-19, which was more than double the case count of previous weeks, KING 5...

Illinois lawmakers OK crime bill cleanup, plan ends bail

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Democrats who control the Illinois General Assembly approved followup clarifications of their watershed criminal justice overhaul Thursday, appeasing critics by adding numerous offenses to a list of crimes that qualify a defendant to remain jailed while awaiting trial. ...

Missouri holds off Arkansas 29-27 to reach bowl eligibility

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas will be headed to similar bowl games after the Tigers held off the Razorbacks 29-27 on Saturday night, leaving each of the bitter border rivals 6-6 on the season. Only one walked out of Faurot Field with victory cigars. Brady...

Rivalry week should bring SEC bowl forecast into clear focus

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — It’s rivalry week for most of the Southeastern Conference. The Egg Bowl. The Iron Bowl. The Palmetto Bowl. The Sunshine Showdown. Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate. The Battle Line Rivalry. It’s a chance for everyone to either avoid or add to the powerhouse...

OPINION

‘I Unreservedly Apologize’

The Oregonian commissioned a study of its history of racism, and published the report on Oct. 24, 2022. The Skanner is pleased to republish the apology written by the editor, Therese Bottomly. We hope other institutions will follow this example of looking...

City Officials Should Take Listening Lessons

Sisters of the Road share personal reflections of their staff after a town hall meeting at which people with lived experience of homelessness spoke ...

When Student Loan Repayments Resume, Will Problems Return Too?

HBCU borrowers question little loan forgiveness, delays to financial security ...

Tell the Supreme Court: We Still Need Affirmative Action

Opponents of affirmative action have been trying to destroy it for years. And now it looks like they just might get their chance. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Ye no longer buying Parler app, Twitter account suspended

Twitter has suspended rapper Ye after he tweeted a picture of a swastika merged with the Star of David. Twitter CEO Elon Musk confirmed the suspension by replying to Ye’s post of an unflattering photo of Musk. Ye called it his “final tweet.” “I tried my best....

25 years later, Bangladesh closer to peace in border region

RANGAMATI, Bangladesh (AP) — A quarter century ago, Modhumala Chakma says it was impossible to leave her house in the evening and walk around the nearby hills because they were controlled by a tribal insurgent group seeking autonomy in southeastern Bangladesh. “It was a difficult...

Report: Wide racial disparity in New York prison discipline

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Black and Hispanic people incarcerated in New York state prisons are more likely than white people to face further punishment once they wind up behind bars, according to a state inspector general report released Thursday. A Black person behind bars in New York...

ENTERTAINMENT

Mistrial after jury deadlock in Danny Masterson rape case

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A judge declared a mistrial Wednesday at the rape trial of “That ’70s Show” actor Danny Masterson after jurors, who were leaning strongly toward acquitting him, deadlocked following the monthlong trial in which the Church of Scientology played a supporting role. ...

Prosecutor: Weinstein a 'degenerate rapist' and 'predator'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Harvey Weinstein was a “predator” with unmistakable patterns who used his Hollywood power to lure women into meetings, sexually assault them and escape the consequences, a prosecutor said in closing arguments Wednesday at the former movie mogul's Los Angeles trial. ...

New version of 'The Wiz' to tour and end up on Broadway

NEW YORK (AP) — A new production of “The Wiz” is heading out on a national tour next year before following the yellow brick road to Broadway, with its director hoping the show becomes a “touchstone for a new generation.” Director Schele Williams tells The Associated Press...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Lagoon dries up as drought grips Peru's southern Andes

CCONCHACCOTA, Peru (AP) — From her home under the baking sun of Peru's southern Andes, Vilma Huamaní can see...

For many Hawaiians, lava flows are a time to honor, reflect

HONOLULU (AP) — When Willette Kalaokahaku Akima-Akau looks out at the the lava flowing from Mauna Loa volcano...

Eritrean forces still killing Tigray civilians, report says

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eritrean troops have continued killing dozens of civilians in Ethiopia’s Tigray region...

'Do something:' Ukraine works to heal soldiers' mental scars

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Sleep plunges the soldier back into the horrors of Ukraine’s battlefields. He can hear...

UK opposition wins special election in blow to Sunak's party

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s opposition Labour Party has handily won a special election for a northwest England...

China fines former NBA star Lin over quarantine comments

BEIJING (AP) — Former NBA star Jeremy Lin, who plays for a Chinese team, was fined 10,000 yuan (jumi,400) for...

Liz Sidoti AP National Political Writer

"I will step aside because I think the party is ready for something different," Steele told the 168-member committee after losing ground over four rounds of balloting. He endorsed challenger Maria Cino, a longtime GOP operative, and called for the party to be unified as it seeks to topple President Barack Obama in 2012.

"Despite the noise, despite the difficulties, we won," Steele said, noting huge gains in November's elections that included the GOP taking control of the House. "We must go forward, and we must win. We fired (Nancy) Pelosi. Let's take the Senate. Let's take the White House."

After four rounds of balloting, Reince Priebus, the Wisconsin Republican Party chairman, was leading in the hunt for 85 votes. Cino, a New York native and a veteran party operative who served in President George W. Bush's administration, was second. Following them were Steele, Ann Wagner, a former Missouri state GOP chair who once was an ambassador under Bush, and Saul Anuzis, a former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party.

Steele's challengers argued that they would be better stewards of the party heading into next year's elections, when defeating Obama will be the GOP's primary objective.

"I want to thank you so much for the chance to serve at a time when our party was changing, struggling to grow, regain its footing, find its voice, reconnect with people and to stand proud again," Steele said earlier as he presided over the RNC's winter meeting for the last time.

A telegenic though gaffe-prone party leader, Steele argued that he should be re-elected because of the GOP's record of coast-to-coast victories while he was chairman last fall. However, Republican operatives formed a network of outside groups that adopted traditional national party functions out of a concern about the RNC's ability under Steele to raise money and deploy resources to key races.

The chairman's job includes serving as the leading spokesman promoting the party's agenda and countering that of Democrats, raising money to help Republicans win in the next elections, and improving a get-out-the-vote effort that critics say languished under Steele.

Most urgently, the new chairman must retire an RNC debt of about $22 million owed to vendors and banks, as well as lure back demoralized donors who have been so frustrated with Steele's management that they sent their dollars elsewhere or didn't open their wallets at all last year. The party had only about $1 million cash on hand at year's end.

The next leader also will have to figure out how to navigate a GOP civil war in which conservatives and tea party disciples are trying to pull the Republican Party even further to the right, to the chagrin of moderates and some longtime establishment leaders.

The first black chairman of the Republican Party, Steele was elected to a two-year term in January 2008 just as Obama - the country's first black president - was taking office.

Since then, Steele, the former lieutenant governor of Maryland, has spent much of his tenure fending off criticism. He faced frequent complaints about questionable spending, anemic fundraising, staff shake-ups and cringe-inducing comments.

Longtime establishment Republicans and GOP elders in Washington argued that he damaged the party's image and its long-term fiscal health.

Steele angered them by predicting the GOP wouldn't win House control last fall; Republicans did win. He also drew their ire when he criticized fellow Republicans in a book that GOP leaders didn't know he was writing until it was published.

He lashed out at critics, telling them to "get a life." Steele also drew fire for collecting payments for his speeches.

Demands for him to resign came last year after the disclosure that RNC money was spent on a $2,000 tab at a sex-themed California night club, and when he said that the 9-year-old conflict in Afghanistan was a mistaken "war of Obama's choosing." It began under Bush.

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