09-19-2020  6:49 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

US Judge Blocks Postal Service Changes That Slowed Mail

The Yakima, Washington judge called the changes “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Greater Portland, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

Latest: Report: Downed Power Lines Sparked 13 Oregon Fires

As wildfires continue to burn in Oregon and the west, here are today's updates.

NEWS BRIEFS

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

National Black Farmers' Association President Calls for Boycott of John Deere

Year after year, John Deere has declined NBFA's invitation to display its equipment at the 116,000-member organization's annual...

City of Vancouver Welcomes New Fire Chief

Brennan Blue is replacing Vancouver Fire Chief Joe Molina, who is retiring after 28 years. ...

Cities creating racial 'healing' committees to confront past

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A growing number of cities across the U.S. are creating committees and task force panels aimed at discussing racial tensions and confronting the past. From Albuquerque, New Mexico, to Clemson, South Carolina, towns and municipalities recently have formed committees...

Underwater and on fire: US climate change magnifies extremes

America's worsening climate change problem is as polarized as its politics. Some parts of the country have been burning this month while others were underwater in extreme weather disasters. The already parched West is getting drier and suffering deadly wildfires because of it, while the much wetter...

AP Top 25 Reality Check: When streaks end, but not really

For the first time since the end of the 2011 season, Ohio State is not ranked in the AP Top 25.The Buckeyes' streak of 132 straight poll appearances is the second-longest active streak in the country, behind Alabama's 198.Of course, in this strange season of COVID-19, Ohio State's streak was...

Potential impact transfers this season aren't limited to QBs

While most of the offseason chatter surrounding college football transfers inevitably focuses on quarterbacks, plenty of notable players at other positions also switched teams and could make major impacts for their new schools this fall.Miami may offer the clearest example of this.Quarterback...

OPINION

The Extraordinary BIPOC Coalition Support Measure 110

Coming together to change the systemic racism of the failed approach to drugs and addiction ...

One Huge Lie Crystallized

The Democrats have cast the President as a failed leader, but Trump’s supporters painted him as a success and the last line of defense against radical socialism. ...

“Losers”???!!!

I am hoping that millions of us will teach Trump what it means to be a loser on November 3rd. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Crowd protests charges against Denver anti-racism leaders

DENVER (AP) — People gathered at the Colorado state Capitol in Denver on Saturday to protest the filing of felony charges against several leaders of racial justice demonstrations.Six protesters, including organizers of demonstrations over the killing of Black 23-year-old Elijah McClain in...

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a towering women’s rights champion who became the court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington. She was 87.Ginsburg died of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer, the court said.Her...

Tax protester in 2007 standoff requests time served sentence

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A man up for resentencing this month over a monthslong armed standoff with U.S. marshals in 2007 to protest a tax evasion conviction says he should be sentenced to the 13 years he has already served. Edward Brown, 78, was sentenced to 37 years in prison after the...

ENTERTAINMENT

Emmys, live and virtual: 'What could possibly go wrong?'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Emmy host Jimmy Kimmel and an alpaca sharing the spotlight. Winners accepting at home in designer pajamas or maybe yoga pants. More than 100 chances for a balky internet connection to bring Sunday’s ceremony to a crashing halt.Come for the awards, stay for the...

DJ Jazzy Jeff talks 'Fresh Prince' reunion, mansion rental

LOS ANGELES (AP) — DJ Jazzy Jeff knew “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” made a mark in television history after filming six seasons during the mid-'90s, but he thought the show’s popularity would eventually fizzle out at some point.So far, that hasn’t happened. The...

Jude Law, Carrie Coon on the moody marital drama ‘The Nest’

Carrie Coon so badly wanted the slow-burn familial drama “The Nest” to be made, she told its director that she’d step aside so that he could cast “someone more famous” in her role. “The Nest,” which is now playing in select theaters nationwide, is...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Tigers manager Gardenhire announces immediate retirement

DETROIT (AP) — Ron Gardenhire mostly maintained his jovial demeanor this season. As recently as Friday...

How Ginsburg's death could reshape the presidential campaign

NEW YORK (AP) — A presidential campaign that was already tugging at the nation’s most searing...

Carpenters wow public with medieval techniques at Notre Dame

PARIS (AP) — With precision and boundless energy, a team of carpenters used medieval techniques to raise up...

Ethiopia charges prominent opposition figure with terrorism

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — Ethiopia has charged its most prominent opposition figure, Jawar Mohammed, and...

Russia's Navalny says he's now more than 'technically alive'

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny said he is recovering his verbal and physical...

Carpenters wow public with medieval techniques at Notre Dame

PARIS (AP) — With precision and boundless energy, a team of carpenters used medieval techniques to raise up...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
McMenamins
Juliet Williams of the Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Democrat Jerry Brown was sworn in Monday as California's 39th governor, returning to the office he left 28 years ago but inheriting a much different and more troubled state than the one he led then.
The man who once was California's most famous bachelor took the oath of office after being introduced by his wife of five years, former Gap Inc. executive Anne Gust Brown, inside Sacramento Memorial Auditorium. She held a Bible that was her grandfather's and was used during her wedding with Brown.  The Skanner News Video
Brown has predicted a grim future for the financially beleaguered state. Where his predecessor, Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger, expressed optimism at every turn, Brown has been realistic since winning the Nov. 2 election. California has faced several years of deep budget deficits and is confronting another estimated at $28 billion through June 2012.
Its general fund is $15 billion less than it was just three years ago, reflecting a sharp drop in tax revenue from a recession that has battered the economy of the nation's most populous state. Brown, 72, said the choices facing California's 38.8 million people are painful.
"The year ahead will demand courage and sacrifice," he said after taking the oath from California Supreme Court Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye.
Brown noted the recession has taken a toll on California and polls show most voters believe the state is on the wrong track. He urged lawmakers with both political parties to get out of what he called their "comfort zones" and to "rise above ideology" for the good of the state.
The inauguration was a scaled-down affair, reflecting the austerity of the former Jesuit seminarian and Buddhism student. Brown's speech lasted about 15 minutes, and the only other speaker listed on the one-page program was his wife.
Brown's style contrasts past governors, some of whom held inaugural balls after their swearing-in ceremony. Schwarzenegger even threw himself what he called a "Wrap Party" last month to celebrate his seven years in office, complete with some of his Hollywood buddies.
Even during Brown's first term as governor, he preached an era of limits, saying government cannot deliver everything people expect from it. He lived that philosophy himself, ditching the governor's mansion for a sparsely furnished apartment and driving a Plymouth instead of riding in a limousine.
Schwarzenegger and former first lady Maria Shriver, former Gov. Gray Davis, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi were among the roughly 3,000 people attending.
After winning office last fall, Brown promised to travel California and hold what he called a civic dialogue about what Californians want from their government and what they are willing to pay for it. After voters rejected an $18-a-year license fee to stabilize state park funding, Brown declared that Californians were "in no mood to add to their burdens."
Yet his press aides have not quashed speculation that Brown will try to call a special election this spring to extend a set of temporary tax hikes approved in 2009. Brown said he would not raise taxes without voter approval, but will need some Republican help to reach the two-thirds legislative vote necessary to place any tax or fee measure on the ballot.
Brown responded to reporters' questions about a possible special election as he left the auditorium.
"I'll confer with the legislative leaders, and we'll work something out that makes sense, but we don't have a lot of time and we've gotta cover a lot of ground," Brown said before heading into his nearby rented loft.
The new governor will release his budget proposal for the coming fiscal year next Monday, when he is expected to deliver voters a series of stark choices. He said his budgets would not contain "smoke and mirrors," an apparent reference to spending plans signed by Schwarzenegger over the past few years that often contained accounting gimmicks and unrealistic revenue assumptions as a way to balance the budgets on paper.
He promised his version would be painful.
"It's a tough budget for tough times," he said.
Brown was engaging the budget problem even before his official swearing-in, visiting lawmakers and finance experts frequently and holding town hall sessions in Sacramento and Los Angeles to discuss the health of California's finances and public school system.
Brown is the son of former two-term governor Edmund G. Brown and has spent a lifetime in politics, including terms as the secretary of state, attorney general and mayor of Oakland. He also will be calling upon a set of skills learned outside the political arena as he tries to negotiate with a Legislature that has grown increasingly partisan and, in many cases, hostile.
His years practicing Buddhism in Japan and working with Mother Teresa in India may come in handy as he tries to broker deals with dug-in lawmakers. Term limits in the Legislature mean many of them have little experience and are eyeing their next office with every vote they take.
He preached a spirit of bipartisanship to solve California's many problems but also said he would not have patience for those who drew lines in the sand.
"At this stage of my life, I've not come here to embrace delay and denial," he said during his speech.
Brown becomes only the second person to serve three terms as California governor when he takes over from Schwarzenegger, a Republican who won office during the 2003 recall election. His tenure as the 34th governor, from 1975 to 1983, was before voter-imposed term limits, allowing Brown to seek the office again this year.
He also is the second oldest person to hold the office — behind Gov. Frank Merriam, who tackled budget deficits during the Great Depression and turned 74 during his final weeks in office in 1939.
During his previous two terms, Brown was criticized for being distracted by his continual pursuit of higher office. He sought the Democratic presidential nominations in 1976 and 1980, then lost a bid for U.S. Senate in 1982.
This time around, he said he's too old to run for higher office. But after introducing his 98-year-old aunt, Connie Carlson, Brown offered a caution for those already eyeing his office.
"By the way, those of you who are hankering after my job, it may be a while. So relax. God willing, the genes are good," he said.

Brown adviser Steve Glazer said he was unsure of Brown's plans for his first day on the job. He could drop by any number of celebrations around town, visit the governor's office or even his rented condo across the street from the auditorium.

A late-afternoon reception was planned for the California Railroad Museum in the Old Sacramento tourist section, but all inaugural festivities were expected to cost less than $100,000.

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