09-27-2020  6:31 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Braces as Right-Wing Extremists Rally

Gov. Kate Brown warned violence would not be tolerated as right wing extremists converge on Portland "looking for a fight"

A Reminder: Delta Park is Vanport

As extreme right-wing, white supremacist groups prepare to converge on Portland tomorrow, here is a reminder of the historical significance of the place they plan to overrun and the stories of the people that lived there.

Wildfires Taint West Coast Vineyards With Taste of Smoke

No one knows the extent of the smoke damage to the crop, and growers are trying to assess the severity.

Black Lives Matters Protestors, Organizers Keep Up Momentum

Hazardous air quality stopped protests for a week, interrupted the more-than-100 nights of demonstrations.

NEWS BRIEFS

Blumenauer Statement on Planned White Supremacist Rally in Portland

“These are evil people looking for a fight and national media attention. Let’s not give them what they want." ...

Wish Launches $2 Million Fund To Support Black-owned Businesses

The Wish Local Empowerment Program is set to impact more than 4,000 small businesses across the US ...

Black Leaders Endorse Sarah Iannarone for Portland Mayor

Iannarone seeks to unseat an embattled Mayor Ted Wheeler, who has increasingly high unfavorable approval ratings. ...

Today in History: Senate Confirms Nomination of First Female Justice to Supreme Court

On Sept. 21, 1981, the Senate unanimously confirmed the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first female justice on the...

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Late night protest in Portland, Oregon, declared unlawful

PORTLAND (AP) — Law enforcement declared an unlawful assembly late Saturday, forcing protesters from downtown Portland, Oregon, and making several arrests, just hours after demonstrations earlier in the day ended without many reports of violence.Hundreds of people were gathered downtown in...

Portland, Oregon, largely peaceful after right-wing rally

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Police say a right-wing rally and counter-protests in Portland, Oregon, have largely dispersed without serious violence Saturday, though they are investigating an assault after one person who was documenting the event was pushed to the ground and kicked in the...

No. 2 Crimson Tide rolls on offense to 38-19 win over Mizzou

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Nick Saban has never lost a season opener while coaching Alabama.Then again, he'd never had one like this.Yet despite an offseason largely scrapped by the coronavirus pandemic, and a delayed start to the season, Saban's second-ranked Crimson Tide looked just fine as they...

No. 2 Alabama visits Missouri to begin SEC-only campaign

No. 2 Alabama at Missouri, Saturday at 7 p.m. ET (ESPN).Line: Alabama by 27 1/2.Series record: Alabama leads 4-2.WHAT’S AT STAKE?The second-ranked Crimson Tide will go for their fifth straight win over Missouri when the teams open their SEC-only schedule at Faurot Field. The Tigers will be...

OPINION

When Black Women's Lives Matter All Lives Will Matter

Brazen disregard for the lives and safety of Black women goes back over 400 years in U.S. history with the definition of Black women’s bodies as property at the complete disposal of white slave-owners ...

Sarah Iannarone Demands Action from Mayor Regarding Planned Right-Wing Demonstrations; Opens Safe Space for Portlanders

BIPOC, Queer, and other marginalized Portlanders will bear the brunt of these attacks simply because of their identity or the color of their skin. ...

National Bar Association Statement on Breonna Taylor Decision

Not only was justice not served, the desultory and insufficient result we received today was also unacceptably slow in manifesting. ...

All Officers Responsible for Breonna Taylor’s Murder Must Be Held Accountable

Vanita Gupta, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, issued a statement in response to the grand jury’s findings regarding the police who murdered Breonna Taylor ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Some Breonna Taylor protesters out past curfew, fires set

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A diverse crowd of hundreds marched in Louisville's streets chanting “Black Lives Matter" on Saturday night, the fourth night of protests after a grand jury declined to charge officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.People in the crowd also chanted...

After a year of drama, the Lakers reach NBA Finals anyway

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Here’s a list of just some of the things the Los Angeles Lakers have gone through in the last 12 months: playing through a politically charged situation in China during the preseason and more massive fallout after returning home, the death of Kobe Bryant...

Car injures 2 protesters during California demonstration

YORBA LINDA, Calif. (AP) — Two people were struck by a car and injured Saturday during a Southern California demonstration involving members of Black Lives Matter and counter-protesters.The incident occurred in the city of Yorba Linda, about 30 miles (48.2 kilometers) southeast of downtown...

ENTERTAINMENT

With spy series 'Tehran,' Israelis reach out to an enemy

NEW YORK (AP) — Things are not as they seem in the new Apple TV+ series “Tehran” — as it should be in a spy thriller. The series opens with a commercial flight from Jordan to India that's suddenly diverted to Iran. A few of the passengers on board have secrets. Those...

Demi Lovato, Max Ehrich call off engagement after 2 months

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Singer-actors Demi Lovato and Max Ehrich have called off their engagement after two months. Lovato and her former fiance have parted ways, according to a person close to Lovato who spoke Thursday on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the matter. The split...

J-pop stars ARASHI release English surprise before hiatus

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Japanese pop sensation ARASHI has a big surprise for fans as they near their planned hiatus at year's end: a collaboration with Bruno Mars on their first all-English single.The band told The Associated Press the multi-Grammy Award-winning musician delved into their...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Fighting erupts between Armenia, Azerbaijan; 2 killed

YEREVAN, Armenia (AP) — Fighting erupted anew Sunday between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed...

Israelis mark Yom Kippur under 'painful' virus lockdown

JERUSALEM (AP) — The solemn Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, which annually sees Israeli life grind to a halt,...

UN: Yemen's warring sides to swap more than 1,000 prisoners

CAIRO (AP) — The United Nations said Yemen’s warring sides agreed Sunday to exchange more than 1,000...

France vows to protect its Jewish community after stabbing

PARIS (AP) — France’s interior minister promised Sunday to protect France’s Jewish community...

Romania's municipal election seen as test for December vote

BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Voters in Romania were casting ballots Sunday in municipal elections, which are...

Attenborough gives shark tooth to 7-year-old Prince George

LONDON (AP) — Veteran broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough has given Britain’s Prince...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
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By Kenneth J. Cooper of America\'s Wire for The Skanner News

While most Americans are unaware of the nation's health disparities, those who are may well think that racial and ethnic minorities become sicker and die more often because they lack medical insurance, tend to be poorer or have unhealthy lifestyles. Or, as a few sophisticates may know, because minorities receive unequal treatment from the medical system, regardless of economic status and insurance coverage.
A growing number of researchers cite a different cause, one that some say actually reflects the others. It is a social fact that has faded from public concern, despite its obvious persistence in every major city: residential segregation.
These researchers say segregation's negative impact on health is true particularly for African-Americans, who studies consistently show are most likely to live apart from other racial-ethnic groups. Blacks, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have the highest overall death rate in the country. The rate of high blood pressure among African-Americans is highest not just in the nation, but also in the world, the American Heart Association reports, as is the percentage of black men who contract prostate cancer.
"I argue that residential segregation by race is the fundamental cause of racial disparities in health in the United States," said David R. Williams, a professor of public health at Harvard University. "It is not my position—I don't think the data are consistent—that segregation is the only cause of disparities in health. It's a major cause. It's a big one."
Williams has been an early and leading voice for this perspective. In 1999, while at the University of Michigan, he helped to conduct a study concluding that the concentration of poverty and disadvantage in segregated neighborhoods contributed to the disparities.
"Segregation determines your economic status," Williams said recently, summing up the finding of that and subsequent studies. "Segregation determines, on average, the quality of schools you go to, your access to employment opportunities, the quality of housing and neighborhoods, whether your environment promotes health or discourages health. And segregation dramatically affects access to medical care."
Segregated black neighborhoods tend to be poor—poorer, in fact, than impoverished white neighborhoods. Recent research, however, has begun to show that race, not class, adversely affects the health of African-Americans in racially isolated communities.
Hope Landrine, a researcher for the American Cancer Society, reviewed the latest studies on residential segregation and black health, and compiled the findings last year in the journal "Ethnicity & Health." Among them:

• Two to three times as many fast food outlets are located in segregated black neighborhoods than in white neighborhoods of comparable socioeconomic status, contributing to higher black consumption of fatty, salty meals and in turn widening racial disparities in obesity and diabetes.

• Black neighborhoods contain two to three times fewer supermarkets than comparable white neighborhoods, creating the kind of "food deserts" that make it difficult for residents who depend on public transportation to purchase the fresh fruits and vegetables that make for a healthy diet.

• Fewer African-Americans have ready access to places to work off excess weight that can gradually cause death. A study limited to New York, Maryland and North Carolina found that black neighborhoods were three times more likely to lack recreational facilities where residents could exercise and relieve stress.

• Because of "the deliberate placement of polluting factories and toxic waste dumps in minority neighborhoods," exposure to air pollutants and toxins is five to 20 times higher than in white neighborhoods with the same income levels.

• Regardless of their socioeconomic status, African-Americans who live in segregated communities receive unequal medical care because hospitals serving them have less technology, such as imaging equipment, and fewer specialists, like those in heart surgery and cancer. The predominantly white doctors in those communities are also less likely to have certification from the American Board of Medical Specialties, an accepted standard of professional competence.

Not all researchers see residential segregation as a major cause of health disparities, or see it in the same way as do Williams, Landrine and others.
In 2003, researchers at Case Western Reserve University presented a paper at a National Institutes of Health meeting that concluded residential segregation was "statistically unassociated with health status," after taking into account other community factors such as unemployment and medical care and individual attributes like age and education levels.
The American Heart Association, while acknowledging the impact of socioeconomic factors, also cites individual factors such as knowledge and practice of healthy choices in diets and lifestyles.
In a 2003 study, Thomas A. LaVeist, director of the Center for Health Disparities Solutions at Johns Hopkins University, study that found that living in segregation shortens the life span of African-Americans.
"However, I argue it is not segregation in itself that is predictive of health outcomes," LaVeist added. "Rather, segregation is reflective of race differences in the social infrastructure, material living conditions and life chances of whites and African-Americans. A consequence of these 'different Americas' is that different race groups have different levels of exposure to health risks."
Whether residential segregation or individual behavior is seen as the main driver of health disparities can make a difference in how government officials and health advocates approach the problem—whether they focus on treating individuals or neighborhoods.
Landrine of the American Cancer Society argued for the neighborhood approach, which might include encouraging farmers markets and supermarkets to operate in segregated black communities or, more controversially, changing local regulations to limit the number of fast-food outlets in those areas.
"Black-White health disparities might be better understood and eliminated by focusing, not on Black people and cultures," Landrine concluded, "but on Black places and contexts."

Kenneth J. Cooper, a Pulitzer Prize winner, is a freelance journalist based in Boston. In 2007, he was a Fair Health Journalism Fellow with the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

PHOTO: Award winning research professor David R. Williams

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