08-22-2019  1:37 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

New Hate Crime Law Kicks In

SB577 requires state to better track bias crimes

Mayor: Show Extra Love at Portland Businesses After Protests

The City of Portland and more are offering deals and free parking downtown this weekend in an effort to generate some of the revenue lost during last weekend's political protests

Community Leaders Heartened By Portland Response To Proud Boys Rally

Proud Boys outnumbered by counter-demonstrators in largely peaceful event

Black Man Told He Couldn't Enter Portland Bar Because of Jewelry Sues

An African American man has filed a 0,000 lawsuit against a Portland bar owner, claiming he was prevented from going inside in 2018 because he was wearing "too many" chain necklaces

NEWS BRIEFS

Travel Portland Opens New Director Park Visitor Center

Hosts “Celebrating All Things Portland” grand opening weekend celebration ...

Police are Trying to Connect Floyd Leslie Hill to His Loved Ones

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the community's help in locating the loved ones of Floyd Leslie Hill who passed away on...

Study Finds Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Drug Clinical Trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs ...

Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

A celebration of the life of one of Portland’s most influential leaders, held at his namesake community center ...

Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

The event will feature free food, arts and crafts, family fun, live music and more ...

Portland, Oregon police hire homeless liaison

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Portland Police Bureau has hired its first-ever liaison officer for working with the city's large homeless community.The agency said Thursday that Stephanie Herro will be the primary contact between the police bureau, homeless advocacy groups, social service...

Firefighters rescue person stuck in septic tank for days

ESTACADA, Ore. (AP) — Firefighters rescued a person who fell into a septic tank and was stuck there for days in a rural area southeast of Portland.The Estacada Rural Fire District No. 69 said on Facebook that crews responded Tuesday to a report of the person falling into the tank while...

Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Why I’m Visiting the Border

People of color are feeling less safe today and any day when we see the realities of domestic terrorism and racially-motivated acts of violence ...

Why Lady Liberty Weeps

The original concept was to have Lady Liberty holding a broken shackle and chain in her left hand, to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. ...

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

North Carolina man freed as prosecutors decline retrial

GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina man who spent 24 years in prison has been freed because prosecutors say they won't pursue a new trial against him.News outlets report a judge ordered a new trial Thursday for 44-year-old Dontae Sharpe, who was serving a murder sentence for a 1994...

Trump awarding Medal of Freedom to NBA star Bob Cousy

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is to present basketball legend Bob Cousy with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in an Oval Office ceremony on Thursday.Cousy, 91, played for the Boston Celtics from 1950 to 1963, winning six league championships...

Nebraska school pulls yearbook photos of teacher's baby

WAVERLY, Neb. (AP) — School administrators have halted distribution of a Nebraska high school yearbook in part because of a story that honors a journalism teacher for how she dealt with the death of her son only 96 minutes after his birth.The district objects to photos of the baby that...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: Raphael Saadiq's history imbues stirring 'Jimmy Lee'

Raphael Saadiq, "Jimmy Lee" (Columbia Records)"Jimmy Lee" is a stirring album combining Raphael Saadiq's trademark vintage soul sounds with moving gospel, disquieting soundscapes and closing triad of tunes that pulls no punches in addressing social ills and personal doubts.Saadiq's family losses to...

Taylor Swift says she plans to re-record her songs' masters

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift plans to re-record her songs after her catalog was purchased by popular music manager Scooter Braun."CBS Sunday Morning" previewed some of its pre-taped interview with Swift on Wednesday. The reporter asks Swift if she would consider re-recording her songs in...

Once upon a time in fatherhood: Tarantino to become a dad

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Quentin Tarantino is going to be telling a whole new brand of "Once upon a time" tale — the bedtime-story kind.The "Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood" director is about to become a father.His representative Katherine Rowe says Tarantino and his wife, Israeli model...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Major carriers, state AGs will work to combat robocalls

NEW YORK (AP) — Major phone companies have pledged to do more to fight robocalls plaguing Americans, the...

Sarah Sanders heads to Fox News as a contributor

NEW YORK (AP) — Former White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, who once sparred with journalists, has...

Crowds honor Kathleen Blanco, former Louisiana governor

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A bagpiper played a somber "Amazing Grace" as Louisiana's first and only female...

Italy's political parties pitch rival plans to capture power

ROME (AP) — In rapid-fire order, Italy's three main political parties pitched possible deals to rivals...

Amazon fires stir bitter dispute over who is to blame

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — As fires raged in the Amazon rainforest, the Brazilian government on Thursday...

UK's Johnson presses for fresh Brexit talks in Paris

PARIS (AP) — France joined Germany on Thursday in challenging British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to show...

McMenamins
Mary Clare Jalonick the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A Massachusetts company is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve the marketing of genetically engineered salmon, which would become the first such animal OK'd for human consumption.
The FDA has not yet decided whether to approve the product, but it is holding two days of hearings on the subject. Ron Stotish, CEO of AquaBounty, said at the meeting Monday that his company's modified fish are environmentally sustainable and safe to eat.
The agency has already said the salmon is as safe to eat as the traditional variety.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Tinker with the genetics of salmon and maybe you create a revolutionary new food source that could help the environment and feed the hungry.
Or maybe you're creating what some say is an untested "frankenfish" that could cause unknown allergic reactions and the eventual decimation of the wild salmon population.
The Food and Drug Administration hears both arguments Monday when it begins a two-day meeting on whether to approve the marketing of the genetically engineered fish, which would be the first such animal approved for human consumption. The agency has already said the salmon, which grows twice as fast as conventional salmon, is as safe to eat as the traditional variety.
Approval of the salmon would open the door for a variety of other genetically engineered animals, including an environmentally friendly pig that is being developed in Canada or cattle that are resistant to mad cow disease.
"For future applications out there the sky's the limit," said David Edwards of the Biotechnology Industry Association. "If you can imagine it, scientists can try to do it."
AquaBounty submitted its first application for FDA approval in 1995, but the agency decided not until two years ago to consider applications for genetically engineered animals - a move seen as a breakthrough by the biotechnology industry.
Genetic engineering is already widely used for crops, but the government until now has not considered allowing the consumption of modified animals. Although the potential benefits - and profits - are huge, many individuals have qualms about manipulating the genetic code of other living creatures.
Genetically engineered - or GE - animals are not clones, which the FDA has already said are safe to eat. Clones are copies of an animal. With GE animals, their DNA has been altered to produce a desirable characteristic.
In the case of the salmon, AquaBounty has added a growth hormone from a Chinook salmon that allows the fish to produce their growth hormone all year long. The engineers were able to keep the hormone active by using another gene from an eel-like fish called an ocean pout that acts like an on switch for the hormone, according to the company. Conventional salmon only produce the growth hormone some of the time.
In documents released ahead of the hearing, the FDA said there were no biologically relevant differences between the engineered salmon and conventional salmon, and there is a reasonable certainty of no harm from its consumption.
Critics have two main concerns: The safety of the food to humans and the salmon's effect on the environment.
Because the altered fish has never been eaten before, they say, it could include dangerous allergens, especially because seafood is highly allergenic. They also worry that the fish will escape and intermingle with the wild salmon population, which is already endangered.They would grow fast and consume more food to the detriment of the conventional wild salmon, the critics fear.
A wide range of environmental, food safety and consumer groups have argued that more public studies are needed and the current FDA process is inadequate because it allows the company to keep some proprietary information private. Modified foods are regulated under the same process used for animal drugs.
"It is outrageous to keep this vital information secret," said Wenonah Hauter, director of the advocacy group Food & Water Watch. "Consumers have a right to know what FDA is trying to allow into our food supply."
Dr. Michael Hansen, senior scientist at Consumers Union, the publisher of Consumer Reports, says the agency is relying on too little data, much of which is supplied by the company itself.
"FDA has set the bar very low," he said.
Ron Stotish, the chief executive of AquaBounty, countered that the company has more than addressed the concerns, and his product has come under much more scrutiny than most food.
"This is perhaps the most studied fish in history," he said. "Environmentally this is a very sustainable technology."
The company has several safeguards in place to allay concerns. All the fish would be bred female and sterile, though a small percentage may be able to breed. They would be bred in confined pools where the potential for escape would be very low.
In its environmental analysis of the fish released earlier this month, the FDA agreed with the company that there are enough safeguards in place.
Stotish says the fish would be bred in better conditions than many of the world's farmed salmon, and could be located closer to population centers to help feed more people. The company has also said the increase in engineered salmon production could help relieve endangered wild salmon populations.
The company is also arguing that the fish do not need to be labeled as genetically engineered, so the common customer would not know if they were eating the modified product or the conventional product. The second day of the FDA meeting will focus on the labeling question.
"This fish is identical to the traditional food," maintained Stotish. "The label could even be misleading because it implies a difference that doesn't exist."
At the meeting Monday, the FDA, the company and critics will present their findings to an advisory committee, which will in turn advise the FDA. A decision will come after the meeting, though it is unclear how long that will take. If approved, the fish could be in grocery stores in two years, the company estimates.
The industry says their job will be to counter the common impression that the modified salmon are "frankenfish."
"In the story of Frankenstein it was the fear of the people driving it, it wasn't the monster that was evil," says Edwards of the Biotechnology Industry Association. "If you look at the science and the safety and you look at the benefits, they become very exciting products."

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