07-10-2020  4:24 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

NEWS BRIEFS

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Capital Rx Establishes Scholarship at Howard University to Support Next Generation of Pharmacists

“Each of us has a role to play in paving a more equitable path for the future of the industry,” said AJ Loiacono, Founder and CEO...

Adams Joins Lawmakers in Move to Repeal Trump’s Birth Control Rule

Without action, SCOTUS decision clears way for Trump Admin rule to take effect ...

Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

The fund will help support artists during COVID crisis and beyond ...

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

The Oregon Historical Society museum will reopen with new hours and new safety protocols ...

1 dead, 1 arrested in shooting outside Portland strip club

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Portland man has been arrested and is being held on suspicion of second-degree murder after a man was shot to death, authorities said Friday.Officers were called to a strip club at about 8:15 p.m. Thursday on reports that a person had been shot. A man was pronounced...

Woodburn sues Marion County over COVID-19 isolation shelter

WOODBURN, Ore. (AP) — The City of Woodburn is suing Marion County over a COVID-19 isolation shelter at a Super 8 Hotel. The lawsuit was filed Thursday following a directive by the Woodburn City Council, the Statesman Journal reported. Attorneys for the city seek a court order against Marion...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Attorney not disputing suicide findings in Black man's death

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An attorney for the family of a Black man found hanging from a tree last month in a Southern California city park did not dispute on Friday investigators' finding that the death was a suicide. The family of Robert Fuller was absorbing the findings and grieving, attorney...

Protester: Man pulls gun on anniversary of flag’s removal

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Counterprotesters said a passing driver pointed a gun at them Friday and said “All Lives Matter,” as competing groups gathered in front of South Carolina’s capitol building to mark the five-year anniversary of the state's removal of the Confederate...

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:___CLAIM: The nasal swab test commonly used for to diagnose COVID-19...

ENTERTAINMENT

Armie Hammer and Elizabeth Chambers separate after 10 years

Actor Armie Hammer and wife Elizabeth Chambers are splitting up after 10 years of marriage and 13 years together. Both parties posted the same message on their respective instagram accounts Friday, writing that they have decided to “turn the page and move on" from the marriage.The couple...

Authorities search for 'Glee' star believed to have drowned

Authorities planned Friday to renew the search for “Glee” star Naya Rivera, who is believed to have drowned in a Southern California lake while boating with her 4-year-old son.Rivera, 33, disappeared after renting the pontoon boat for three hours Wednesday afternoon and taking it out...

How The Chicks dropped the word 'Dixie' from their name

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When The Chicks decided to drop the word “Dixie” from the band's name, it was the culmination of years of internal discussions and attempts to distance itself from negative connotations with the word. The 13-time Grammy-winning trio made the switch last...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Jada and Will Smith address relationship in ‘Table Talk’

LOS ANGELES (AP) — With their marriage under social-media scrutiny, Jada Pinkett Smith and Will Smith...

Amazon says email to employees banning TikTok was a mistake

Roughly five hours after an internal email went out Friday to Amazon employees telling them to delete the popular...

Justice Department plans to appeal ruling halting execution

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department plans to appeal a judge’s ruling that halted the first...

Cyprus: US military training won't harm Russia, China ties

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Cyprus’ government said Friday that a U.S. decision to provide education and...

Brazil LGBTQ group hides from virus in Copacabana building

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a courtyard a few blocks from Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana beach, a dozen...

Hundreds try to storm Serbian parliament as protests heat up

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Police fired tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators who tried to storm Serbia's...

McMenamins
Julie Pace, the Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Challenging civil rights organizations and teachers' unions that have criticized his education policies, President Barack Obama said Thursday that minority students have the most to gain from overhauling the nation's schools.
"We have an obligation to lift up every child in every school in this country, especially those who are starting out furthest behind," Obama told the centennial convention of the National Urban League.
The Skanner News Video click here
The Urban League has been a vocal critic of Obama's education policies, most notably the $4.35 billion "Race to the Top" program that awards grants to states based on their plans for innovative education reforms. A report released earlier this week by eight civil rights groups, including the Urban League, says federal data shows that just 3 percent of the nation's black students and less than 1 percent of Latino students are affected by the first round of the administration's "Race to the Top" competition.
Obama pushed back Thursday, arguing that minority students are the ones who have been hurt the most by the status quo.
Obama's reforms have also drawn criticism from education advocates, including prominent teachers' unions like the American Federation of Teachers, who have argued that the reforms set unfair standards for teacher performance.
Obama said the goal isn't to fire or admonish teachers, but to create a culture of accountability. He pinned some of the criticism on a resistance to change.
"We get comfortable with the status quo even when the status quo isn't good," he said. "When you try to shake things up, sometimes people aren't happy."
Seeking to ease his strained relationship with the powerful teacher's unions, Obama hailed teachers as "the single most important factor in a classroom," calling for higher pay, better training and additional resources to help teachers succeed.
"Instead of a culture where we're always idolizing sports stars or celebrities, I want us to build a culture where we idolize the people who shape our children's future," Obama said.
The president laid the groundwork for what he called "an honest conversation" about education with comments on several recent developments that were designed as sweeteners for his mostly minority audience.
For instance, he said his goal with his domestic agenda, including the economy, health care and other priorities, is to create "an economy that lifts all Americans — not just some, but all." That comment earned him significant applause and pleased murmurs in the room.
The president also said he very much looks forward to signing a bill recently passed by Congress to reduce the disparities between mandatory crack and powder cocaine sentences. The matter has been a longtime thorn for the black community, as the quarter-century-old law that Congress changed has subjected tens of thousands of blacks to long prison terms for crack cocaine convictions while giving far more lenient treatment to those, mainly whites, caught with the powder form of the drug.
"We got it done," Obama said. "It's the right thing to do."
And he forthrightly addressed the racial firestorm over the recent ouster of a black Agriculture Department official. He said the forced resignation of Shirley Sherrod "marked both the challenges we face and the progress we've made."
"She deserves better than what happened last week," Obama said.
___
Associated Press White House Correspondent Jennifer Loven contributed to this report.

image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Port of Seattle Police We Want to Hear
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

burgerville allies
https://www.oregonclinic.com/patients/appointments