06-17-2019  12:35 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

Forum to Follow Congressional Hearing on Bill to Form a Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals ...

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

New shows are Alice in Wonderland, Macbeth and All’s Well That Ends Well. ...

Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

The Oregon Historical Society Presents a Lecture on Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Join the Oregon Historical Society for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to Blacks ...

Oregon House proposes oil train fees for spill planning

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon House of Representatives has passed a bill that would create new fees on oil train cars to pay for spill prevention and planning in the state.The House passed the bill on a 55-3 vote Monday, according to a report by The Oregonian/OregonLive, sending it to the...

All 7 of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — All seven of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition for the 2019-2020 school year, with officials citing increased costs and less money than expected from legislators.The hikes range from 2.33% at Western Oregon University in Monmouth to 9.9% at Ashland's Southern...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buttigieg returns to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A police officer fatally shot a black man in South Bend, Indiana, leading Mayor Pete Buttigieg to return home early from a presidential campaign trip to address the public and reach out to community members.The shooting happened early Sunday after someone called police to...

Search warrant cites synagogue shooter's hatred of Judaism

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The sole gunman in a Southern California synagogue shooting in which a woman was killed told an investigator he adopted his hatred of Judaism 18 months before the fatal attack, according to a federal search warrant.John T. Earnest, 19, also told a San Diego Sheriff's...

Sentencing moved up for man in deadly Charlottesville rally

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A sentencing hearing has been moved up for an avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia.James Alex Fields Jr. was originally scheduled to be...

ENTERTAINMENT

APNewsBreak: 'Hunger Games' prequel novel coming in 2020

NEW YORK (AP) — A decade after seemingly wrapping up "The Hunger Games," Suzanne Collins is bringing readers back to Panem. A prequel, set 64 years before the beginning of her multimillion-selling trilogy, is coming next year.The novel, currently untitled, is scheduled for release on May 19,...

Shania Twain set to party again in Vegas with new residency

NEW YORK (AP) — Since Shania Twain launched her first residency in Las Vegas seven years ago, Sin City has been invaded with contemporary pop stars, from Lady Gaga to Drake to Christina Aguilera, jumping on the residency trend. Even Cardi B has plans for a short-term Vegas residency this...

Taylor Swift's new video features Ellen, RuPaul and more

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift's new music video features a number of famous faces, including Ellen DeGeneres, Laverne Cox, RuPaul and the cast of "Queer Eye."The clip for her song "You Need to Calm Down," in which Swift calls out homophobes and her own haters, was released Monday.Ryan...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses are imploring President Donald Trump not to expand his tariffs to 0...

Scientists take a peek behind those sad puppy dog eyes

NEW YORK (AP) — What's behind those hard-to-resist puppy dog eyes?New research suggests that over thousands...

Masked gunman opens fire on Dallas courthouse, then dies

DALLAS (AP) — A masked gunman opened fire Monday on a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas before being...

Sources: US to question Assange pal jailed in Ecuador

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — U.S. investigators have received permission from Ecuador to question a Swedish...

Pakistani police target traffickers selling brides to China

FAISALABAD, Pakistan (AP) — At first, in her desperate calls home to her mother in Pakistan, Natasha Masih...

The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

LE BOURGET, France (AP) — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):7 p.m.The chief salesman for...

McMenamins
Kelly Gilblom Uw News Lab

The number of Washington families struggling with hunger has risen through the recession, according to recent report by the Food and Research Action Center.
Nearly one in five of the almost half a million families polled said they struggled to afford food in 2009. The previous year, the hunger rate was 16 percent, two percentage points lower than now.
"The recession really has caused a lot more families to get to the point where they don't have enough to eat," said Linda Stone, senior food policy coordinator for Children's Alliance- a state group that advocates for the wellbeing of children. Intractable parts of a family budget such as rent, utilities and car expenses squeeze out money for meals.
With unemployment rates now in the double digits, it is not a surprise to see more people straining to afford the basics. According to Stone, individuals on fixed incomes, senior citizens with small pensions, those with language barriers or in distant, rural communities and families with young children are the most common demographics that encounter problems affording food.
To cope, many enlist in the Washington Basic Food Program, known as food stamps, or the Women Infant Children Program, which provides basics such as milk and eggs. Children can also sign up to receive breakfast and lunch at public school.
The Basic Food Program, which was revamped in 2008, now allows individuals to apply online and be interviewed for acceptance over the phone. Since the changes, it has seen a 50 percent rise with 850,000 families in the state receiving food stamps to purchase what the program refers to as "basic nutrition."
However, some still struggle to make do, especially at the end of the month, said Stone. They might need to go to a food bank as a last resort.
"You can go to a food bank pretty much every week if you need to. That's how a lot of families get it for the month," said Stone. "And so far they have really been able to help."
Peggy Bailey, operations manager of the Ballard Food Bank, has seen demand rise by 30 percent over the past year.
"A lot of people who are in our lines this year were donors last year," she said.
The food bank, which receives food largely through private donations and grocery store surplus, never turns anyone away.
Though, the common thread through all forms of food handouts is the risk of a lack of adequate nutrition.
"Healthy food costs more," said Stone. "You can certainly afford more top ramen and macaroni and cheese than fresh fruits and vegetables."
Because of underfunding, food programs cannot buy high quality foods.
One of the groups with the greatest food hardships is families with young children. Kids in their early years usually have young parents, which means less time having been established in the work force, and a greater need for governmental help.
Already, 42 percent of eligible school age children are signed up to receive free or reduced priced meal programs at school, according to Stone. Though, only 11 percent of those children enrolled have access to free meals in the summer.
Stone believes the lawmakers can help make a difference in this area. Child nutrition programs are up for reauthorization before Congress this year, so legislators will be required to rewrite the law governing meals available to children.
"We're asking state legislature to provide $250,000 grants to communities," said Stone. "We're in a terrible budget year but frankly we've got a lot of legislators this year who really get it." She said the investment would leverage $3 million to $4 million in federal money.
Washington second district Rep. Rick Larsen, proposed a bill in Dec. 2009 that would also provide after school snacks for children of low-income families. It would function as an amendment to the Child Nutrition Act, expanding federal reimbursement for organizations that provide after-school snacks.
"Our country has a moral obligation to make sure that kids get enough to eat every day," said Rep. Larsens in a Dec. 10 press release. "Improving nutrition for low-income kids helps them perform better in school and avoid serious health problems down the road."
By ticking off the list of available food sources in the Seattle area, it is possible to stay fed, even if it is with great difficulty and without ideal nutrition. However, the greater problem of poverty remains.

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