01-21-2020  3:48 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

St. Andrew Parish Presents 2020 Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards

The awards are given to people whose service embodies the values of Dr. King, who used nonviolence, civil disobedience, and Christian teaching to advance the cause of civil rights in America

The Skanner in Step With Changing Times

Celebrating a history of service

Starbucks, Home of the $4 Latte, is Moving Into Poor Areas

Starbucks plans to open or remodel 85 stores by 2025 in rural and urban communities across the U.S. The effort will bring to 100 the number of "community stores" Starbucks has opened since it announced the program in 2015

Native American Curriculum Rolls Out in Oregon Classrooms

The state developed the curriculum, as required by Senate Bill 13, with the input of Native leaders for 18 months, but is still behind. A soft roll-out begins this month

NEWS BRIEFS

Nashville Airport Store Seeks Works by African American Authors

The store, a namesake project of Mrs. Rosetta Miller-Perry and The Tennessee Tribune, will open March 2020 ...

Annual “Salute to Greatness” Luncheon Celebrating Students, Community & Civic Leaders

Keynote Speaker: Ms. Rukaiyah Adams, Chair of Oregon Investment Council & Chief Investment Officer at Meyer Memorial Trust....

Grant High School Students to Read Their Own Work at Broadway Books

Local author and writing instructor Joanna Rose will lead thegroup of young writers at the event to be held on Wednesday, January 22 ...

AG Rosenblum Announces $4 Million Settlement with CenturyLink

Since 2014, Oregon DOJ has received more than 1,200 consumer complaints about CenturyLink ...

Black Guest at Downtown Portland Hotel Sues Over ‘No Party’ Promise

Felicia Gonzales claims the front desk clerk at the Residence Inn told her that all guests had to sign the policy, but she watched...

Indigenous ‘Molly of Denali’ is more than a cartoon for some

Charitie Ropati watched the pilot episode of “Molly of Denali” in her Columbia University dorm room, huddled around a computer screen with friends.“We were crying,” Ropati said. “We realized we finally had positive representation.”“Molly of...

Nonprofit funds lawyers to defend news media in 5 states

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A nonprofit press freedom group announced on Tuesday that it would provide pro bono legal services in five states to help local news organizations defend their right to gather and report the news. The Local Legal Initiative of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of...

New Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz predicts success

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz was saying all the right things after being introduced as the new football coach at Missouri, laying out his vision for the once-proud program with unwavering confidence and bold proclamations.Then the former Appalachian State coach made a minor...

LSU's Burrow, Auburn's Brown named AP SEC players of year

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow is a unanimous selection as the offensive player of the year on The Associated Press All-Southeastern Conference football team.The top-ranked Tigers also have the SEC’s coach of the year in Ed Orgeron and the newcomer of the year in freshman cornerback Derek...

OPINION

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

How Putting Purpose Into Your New Year’s Resolutions Can Bring Meaning and Results

Only 4% of people report following through on all of the resolutions they personally set ...

I Was Just Thinking… Mama in the Classroom

I wrote my first column in 1988 for a local newspaper about a beloved Dallas guidance counselor and teacher that most students called “Mama” ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Biden widens Black Caucus support after Harris, Booker exits

FORT DODGE, Iowa (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden continued to run up his advantage among black political leaders Tuesday, with four Congressional Black Caucus members announcing their support, including three who previously backed Sens. Kamala Harris or Cory Booker.Georgia...

California governor asked to pardon late gay rights leader

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Legislature’s LGBTQ and black caucuses on Tuesday asked Gov. Gavin Newsom to posthumously pardon a civil rights leader who was jailed for having gay sex nearly 70 years ago.Bayard Rustin was a confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., along with...

AP FACT CHECK: Trump's Davos remarks rife with distortion

WASHINGTON (AP) — On a rarefied world stage in the Swiss Alps, President Donald Trump cited accomplishments on clean air that aren't real, a level of economic progress he hasn't achieved and a blue-collar boom yet to be seen.His preening performance at the Davos economic conference was rife...

ENTERTAINMENT

Oscar presenters to include Colman, Malek, King and Ali

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The winners of last year’s acting Academy Awards will return to the Oscar stage next month to present the coveted statuettes.The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Tuesday that Olivia Colman, Rami Malek, Regina King and Mahershala Ali will present...

Rocker Ozzy Osbourne announces Parkinson's diagnosis

NEW YORK (AP) — Rocker Ozzy Osbourne says that he's been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, a nervous system disorder that affects movement. The 71-year-old Grammy winner and former vocalist for the metal band Black Sabbath said during an interview on “Good Morning America”...

Weinstein defense points to 'loving emails' as openings near

NEW YORK (AP) — Harvey Weinstein's lawyers want to use intimate emails from his accusers to try to convince jurors in his rape trial that any contact was consensual, the defense said Tuesday as an appeals court rejected an 11th-hour request to move the trial out of town. Opening statements...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Derek Jeter, Larry Walker elected to baseball Hall of Fame

NEW YORK (AP) — Derek Jeter came within one vote of being a unanimous pick for the Hall of Fame while Larry...

At 90, Alaska Native woman will be 1st counted in US Census

TOKSOOK BAY, Alaska (AP) — Lizzie Chimiugak has lived for 90 years in the windswept western wilds of...

Netanyahu tries to rally global opposition to ICC case

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is calling on the world to take “concrete...

Allegations bite into business of 'Africa's richest woman'

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Portuguese bank EuroBic said it will stop doing business with companies and people...

Survivor stories spotlight Auschwitz liberation anniversary

JERUSALEM (AP) — Shortly before they were rounded up by Nazi troops in Belgium and deported to Auschwitz in...

Putin names new Cabinet as key members of Russian govt stay

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin formed his new Cabinet Tuesday, replacing many of its...

McMenamins
Susan Palmer the (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) -- Oregon's recycling gurus have been breaking it to us gently for years: Throwing electronics into the garbage is a bad idea, they say. Now, with power from a law passed in 2007, they'll resort to tough love.
Beginning Jan. 1, it will be illegal to put some electronics -- specifically, televisions, monitors, computers and laptops -- in the trash.
And, thanks to fees Oregon has begun collecting from manufacturers, consumers will continue to be able to drop off these four types of items for free at a number of locations.
The new dumping ban will keep products known for a host of toxic components -- lead, mercury and cadmium, for example -- out of landfills where they could pose a threat to air, soil and water, said Lane County waste reduction specialist Sarah Grimm.
Better still, the e-waste goes to recyclers who break it down into its component parts -- from metals to plastics -- which can be reused in a process that consumes less energy than using virgin materials, said Kathy Kiwala, the e-waste project leader for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.
That means fewer greenhouse gas emissions, Kiwala said, citing a federal Environmental Protection Agency estimate that recycling 1 million computers is the equivalent of eliminating the annual emissions of 17,000 cars.
Recycling electronics isn't new. For years, Lane County has accepted e-waste at its Glenwood Receiving Station, Grimm said.
And the Eugene nonprofit agency NextStep Recycling has gained a national reputation for its focus on reusing computers and making them available to low-income residents.
But the county used to require residents to make an appointment to unload their old equipment, and charged a fee to take it.
NextStep also charged a fee to take TVs and monitors, said executive director Lorraine Kerwood. That fee made it possible for NextStep to make sure the gear that couldn't be reused was recycled responsibly, she said.
Last January, because of the new law, free recycling began in Oregon, with counties setting up locations where people could take their devices. In Lane County, residents jumped at the chance to avoid the fees.
``We saw an explosion,'' Grimm said. ``What used to be a truck load (of electronics) every six weeks turned into a truck load a week or more,'' she said.
In 2008, Lane County collected 53 tons of the electronic devices covered by the new law. In the first 11 months of 2009, the county has collected 216 tons, Grimm said.
While it's good news from a landfill management standpoint, it has hit NextStep Recycling hard, Kerwood said. The nonprofit wanted to continue receiving people's electronic castoffs but could no longer charge the $15 fee it once collected for taking in TVs and monitors.
That money covered the cost of dismantling them and transporting them to a reliable northwest recycler who wouldn't ship the materials overseas where extraction of the metals and other useable parts is sometimes done in an unsafe manner.
The money NextStep receives from the state program _ just 6 to 8 cents per pound for the shredded parts destined for recycling _ doesn't support the nonprofit's primary mission: reusing electronics that still have some life in them, Kerwood said. Even though those electronics also are kept out of the landfill, NextStep gets no money for them from the state.
``Many organizations were negatively affected by the well-intentioned but shortsighted law,'' Kerwood said. ``Our income was cut 40 percent when the law rolled out. We had worked for years to educate the public that there's a cost to doing it the right way.''
NextStep also scrubs all the personal information off the computers and other electronic equipment that comes through its doors, she said.
NextStep and other electronics recyclers will continue to take all of the other items the new Oregon law doesn't cover, such as cell phones, printers, fax machines and scanners, Kerwood said.
Meanwhile, people caught throwing the banned electronics in the trash face a potential $500 per item fine, Grimm said.
The more likely scenario for those who do put a television in the trash is that it will be fished out by the garbage hauler and set on the curb with a note explaining the new law, said the DEQ's Kiwala.
If the hauler gets as far as a county transfer station with it, it could result in a warning letter from the Department of Environmental Quality, assuming workers are able to identify the person who threw it out, Kiwala said.
The new law allows households, nonprofit groups with 10 or fewer employees and small businesses to recycle seven of the covered electronic devices at a time. Larger businesses and nonprofit agencies can be charged for items exceeding the limit.
The DEQ Web site has a list of recyclers who work with larger businesses needing to recycle a lot of items, Kiwala said.

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Delta Founders Day 2020