08-15-2022  12:17 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Lottery Misses Mark on Minorities’ Fair Share

The Oregon Lottery’s most recent advertising slogan is “Together, we do good things”. But when we look at where the profits are coming from and where any potential benefit from lottery profits flow to, is this really true? 

Court Sides With Governor Kate Brown Over Early Prison Releases

Two attorneys took particular issue with Brown’s decision to allow 73 people convicted of murder, assault, rape and manslaughter while they were younger than 18 to apply for early release.

Ballot Measure to Overhaul City Government Promises Minority Representation While Facing Controversy

The Portland Charter Commission aims to bring city in line with how other major U.S. cities do local governance. 

White Woman Calls Police on Black Man Standing at His Home

“If you guys have a lease, I’d just like to see the lease,”

NEWS BRIEFS

Seattle Hospital to Refuse Some Patients Due to Capacity

The hospital is caring for some 560 inpatients, more than 130% of its licensed capacity of 413 patients. ...

West Seattle Bridge to Reopen After Yearslong Closure

The 40-year-old bridge is among the city’s most important, previously allowing 100,000 drivers and 20,000 transit users to move...

Jefferson Alumni Invites Community to Block Party

This inaugural event is open to the public and will have tons of entertainment in tow, including a live DJ and music, a rib contest,...

Oregon Approved to Issue an Additional $46 Million in Pandemic EBT Food Assistance to 80,000 Young Children

The additional food benefits will be issued to families’ existing EBT cards in Fall 2022, with the exact dates yet to be...

Free Vaccination Events Provide Required Back-to-School Immunizations

On or before the first day of instruction, all K-12 students in Washington state must be up to date on vaccinations required for...

Coast Guard responds to small oil spill near San Juan Island

SEATTLE (AP) — The U.S. Coast Guard is responding to a diesel spill off the west coast of Washington state's San Juan Island after a 49-foot (15-meter) fishing vessel sank with an estimated 2,600 gallons (9,854 liters) of fuel on board. A Good Samaritan rescued all five crew members...

Police: Woman dies in Seattle light rail station accident

SEATTLE (AP) — Police say a woman has died after being struck by a Seattle light rail train at a station on Sunday. KIRO-TV reports that firefighters worked to extricate the woman from between the train and a platform at the Mount Baker Station. She was evaluated by paramedics...

OPINION

No One Ever Told You About Black August?

Black America lives in a series of deserts. Many of us live in food deserts, financial deserts, employment deserts, and most of us live in information deserts. ...

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Developer finds human remains near Nashville Civil War fort

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A developer has unearthed human remains that could be two centuries old while digging to lay the foundation of a new Nashville project not far from a Civil War fort and a cemetery dating back to 1822. For Nashville, the discovery marks the latest intersection...

Kansas district rejects strategic plan urging diversity

DERBY, Kan. (AP) — A Kansas school district's board rejected a proposed strategic plan after some members questioned its emphasis on diversity and students' mental health. The Derby Board of Education voted 4-3 this week to reject a plan presented after months of work by parents,...

Two years on, foundations stand by issuing bonds in pandemic

NEW YORK (AP) — When the Ford Foundation took the unprecedented step in June 2020 of issuing jumi billion in debt to help stabilize other nonprofits, it delighted investors and inspired several other large foundations to follow suit. Two years later, the foundations all stand by...

ENTERTAINMENT

Jon Batiste leaves Stephen Colbert's 'The Late Show'

NEW YORK (AP) — Jon Batiste, his career soaring after winning multiple Grammys this year, is leaving his perch as bandleader of “The Late Show” after a seven-year run backing up host Stephen Colbert. “We’ve been so lucky to have a front row seat to Jon’s incredible talent...

In ‘The Princess,’ a documentary on Diana flips the focus

The last thing the world needs, you might think, is another Princess Diana documentary. It’s a fair thought considering that almost 25 years after her death, her life and impact is still media fodder. Whether it’s a magazine cover or a book claiming to have new revelations or just...

'South Park' enjoys a silver anniversary of satire

NEW YORK (AP) — Reaching the age of 25 is usually a sign of hitting adulthood, a signal to put away all childish things. Not for “South Park” and stars Stan, Kyle, Kenny and Cartman. The Comedy Central staple about four bratty, perpetually bundled-up youngsters in an unhinged...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Police: Man killed himself after ramming US Capitol barrier

WASHINGTON (AP) — A man drove his car into a barricade near the U.S. Capitol early Sunday and then began firing...

Whanganui River 'always makes things better for me'

WHANGANUI, New Zealand (AP) — Five years ago, the Whanganui River was recognized as a living person in a...

Salman Rushdie 'on the road to recovery,' agent says

MAYVILLE, N.Y. (AP) — Salman Rushdie is “on the road to recovery,” his agent confirmed Sunday, two days...

A year on, ex-Afghan leader defends role in Taliban takeover

ISLAMABAD (AP) — On the eve of the anniversary of the Taliban takeover of Kabul, Afghanistan's former president...

Ship carrying grain for hungry Ethiopia leaves Ukraine

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — A United Nations-chartered ship loaded with 23,000 metric tons of Ukrainian grain destined...

Malaysia ex-PM begins final bid to toss out graft conviction

PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's top court Monday began hearing a final appeal by former Prime Minister...

Susan Palmer the (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) -- Oregon's recycling gurus have been breaking it to us gently for years: Throwing electronics into the garbage is a bad idea, they say. Now, with power from a law passed in 2007, they'll resort to tough love.
Beginning Jan. 1, it will be illegal to put some electronics -- specifically, televisions, monitors, computers and laptops -- in the trash.
And, thanks to fees Oregon has begun collecting from manufacturers, consumers will continue to be able to drop off these four types of items for free at a number of locations.
The new dumping ban will keep products known for a host of toxic components -- lead, mercury and cadmium, for example -- out of landfills where they could pose a threat to air, soil and water, said Lane County waste reduction specialist Sarah Grimm.
Better still, the e-waste goes to recyclers who break it down into its component parts -- from metals to plastics -- which can be reused in a process that consumes less energy than using virgin materials, said Kathy Kiwala, the e-waste project leader for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.
That means fewer greenhouse gas emissions, Kiwala said, citing a federal Environmental Protection Agency estimate that recycling 1 million computers is the equivalent of eliminating the annual emissions of 17,000 cars.
Recycling electronics isn't new. For years, Lane County has accepted e-waste at its Glenwood Receiving Station, Grimm said.
And the Eugene nonprofit agency NextStep Recycling has gained a national reputation for its focus on reusing computers and making them available to low-income residents.
But the county used to require residents to make an appointment to unload their old equipment, and charged a fee to take it.
NextStep also charged a fee to take TVs and monitors, said executive director Lorraine Kerwood. That fee made it possible for NextStep to make sure the gear that couldn't be reused was recycled responsibly, she said.
Last January, because of the new law, free recycling began in Oregon, with counties setting up locations where people could take their devices. In Lane County, residents jumped at the chance to avoid the fees.
``We saw an explosion,'' Grimm said. ``What used to be a truck load (of electronics) every six weeks turned into a truck load a week or more,'' she said.
In 2008, Lane County collected 53 tons of the electronic devices covered by the new law. In the first 11 months of 2009, the county has collected 216 tons, Grimm said.
While it's good news from a landfill management standpoint, it has hit NextStep Recycling hard, Kerwood said. The nonprofit wanted to continue receiving people's electronic castoffs but could no longer charge the $15 fee it once collected for taking in TVs and monitors.
That money covered the cost of dismantling them and transporting them to a reliable northwest recycler who wouldn't ship the materials overseas where extraction of the metals and other useable parts is sometimes done in an unsafe manner.
The money NextStep receives from the state program _ just 6 to 8 cents per pound for the shredded parts destined for recycling _ doesn't support the nonprofit's primary mission: reusing electronics that still have some life in them, Kerwood said. Even though those electronics also are kept out of the landfill, NextStep gets no money for them from the state.
``Many organizations were negatively affected by the well-intentioned but shortsighted law,'' Kerwood said. ``Our income was cut 40 percent when the law rolled out. We had worked for years to educate the public that there's a cost to doing it the right way.''
NextStep also scrubs all the personal information off the computers and other electronic equipment that comes through its doors, she said.
NextStep and other electronics recyclers will continue to take all of the other items the new Oregon law doesn't cover, such as cell phones, printers, fax machines and scanners, Kerwood said.
Meanwhile, people caught throwing the banned electronics in the trash face a potential $500 per item fine, Grimm said.
The more likely scenario for those who do put a television in the trash is that it will be fished out by the garbage hauler and set on the curb with a note explaining the new law, said the DEQ's Kiwala.
If the hauler gets as far as a county transfer station with it, it could result in a warning letter from the Department of Environmental Quality, assuming workers are able to identify the person who threw it out, Kiwala said.
The new law allows households, nonprofit groups with 10 or fewer employees and small businesses to recycle seven of the covered electronic devices at a time. Larger businesses and nonprofit agencies can be charged for items exceeding the limit.
The DEQ Web site has a list of recyclers who work with larger businesses needing to recycle a lot of items, Kiwala said.

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