06-17-2019  11:54 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

Forum to Follow Congressional Hearing on Bill to Form a Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals ...

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

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Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

The Oregon Historical Society Presents a Lecture on Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Join the Oregon Historical Society for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to Blacks ...

All 7 of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — All seven of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition for the 2019-2020 school year, with officials citing increased costs and less money than expected from legislators.The hikes range from 2.33% at Western Oregon University in Monmouth to 9.9% at Ashland's Southern...

Shooter fires at car after dispute at Oregon gas station

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a car was struck by gunfire following a parking dispute at an Oregon gas station.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports a BMW sedan had stopped at gas station in Rock Creek northwest of Portland early Sunday.Washington County Sheriff's Detective Robert...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buttigieg returns to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A police officer fatally shot a black man in South Bend, Indiana, leading Mayor Pete Buttigieg to return home early from a presidential campaign trip to address the public and reach out to community members.The shooting happened early Sunday after someone called police to...

Search warrant cites synagogue shooter's hatred of Judaism

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The sole gunman in a Southern California synagogue shooting in which a woman was killed told an investigator he adopted his hatred of Judaism 18 months before the fatal attack, according to a federal search warrant.John T. Earnest, 19, also told a San Diego Sheriff's...

Sentencing moved up for man in deadly Charlottesville rally

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A sentencing hearing has been moved up for an avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia.James Alex Fields Jr. was originally scheduled to be...

ENTERTAINMENT

APNewsBreak: 'Hunger Games' prequel novel coming in 2020

NEW YORK (AP) — A decade after seemingly wrapping up "The Hunger Games," Suzanne Collins is bringing readers back to Panem. A prequel, set 64 years before the beginning of her multimillion-selling trilogy, is coming next year.The novel, currently untitled, is scheduled for release on May 19,...

Shania Twain set to party again in Vegas with new residency

NEW YORK (AP) — Since Shania Twain launched her first residency in Las Vegas seven years ago, Sin City has been invaded with contemporary pop stars, from Lady Gaga to Drake to Christina Aguilera, jumping on the residency trend. Even Cardi B has plans for a short-term Vegas residency this...

Taylor Swift's new video features Ellen, RuPaul and more

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift's new music video features a number of famous faces, including Ellen DeGeneres, Laverne Cox, RuPaul and the cast of "Queer Eye."The clip for her song "You Need to Calm Down," in which Swift calls out homophobes and her own haters, was released Monday.Ryan...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses are imploring President Donald Trump not to expand his tariffs to 0...

State media say Chinese President Xi to visit North Korea

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping will make a state visit to North Korea this week, state media...

Beyond rivers, Midwestern floodwaters hurt seafood catches

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — This is a bad year for people who make their living from seafood in Louisiana and...

Sources: US to question Assange pal jailed in Ecuador

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — U.S. investigators have received permission from Ecuador to question a Swedish...

Pakistani police target traffickers selling brides to China

FAISALABAD, Pakistan (AP) — At first, in her desperate calls home to her mother in Pakistan, Natasha Masih...

The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

LE BOURGET, France (AP) — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):7 p.m.The chief salesman for...

McMenamins
Gene Johnson Associated Press Writer

SEATTLE (AP) -- In one corner of Washington state, a 62-year-old rheumatoid arthritis patient could face more than eight years in prison for growing marijuana for himself and three others. In Seattle, meanwhile, a collection of grow operations serves 2,000 people with little interference from police.
The discrepancy is typical of the confusion that has reigned since voters passed Washington's medical marijuana law more than a decade ago. Nor have things improved much since the state clarified how much pot patients can have last year.
Unlike some states, Washington requires patients to grow marijuana themselves or designate a caregiver to grow it for them. For many, that's unrealistic: They're too sick to grow cannabis themselves and don't have the thousands of dollars it can cost for a caregiver to set up a proper growing operation.
So they've devised their own schemes, claiming to meet the letter of the law in establishing collective grows or storefront dispensaries -- methods that are making police and prosecutors increasingly uncomfortable.
"The spirit of the law would recognize the necessity of having small cooperative ventures," said Dan Satterberg, the prosecutor in King County, where Seattle is. "But if they get past a certain size, become a magnet for neighborhood violence, or you get other people showing up to buy marijuana who are not permitted to under the law, then there's tension."
Three years ago, Satterberg's office declined to prosecute a man who was growing 130 plants for 40 people. But a case this year may be testing his tolerance: He hasn't decided whether to charge a hepatitis patient caught with 200 plants, which he claimed supplied more than 100 other patients.
Some activists and the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington recently began discussions with Seattle police over whether to limit the size of cooperative grows.
In Spokane this month, police shut down a medical marijuana dispensary -- the first such bust in the state -- and arrested the two owners. They warned a half-dozen other dispensaries to close as well, and the raid quickly drew protests from patients. The raid has set up a high-profile court fight.
Approved by voters in 1998, it allows doctors to recommend cannabis as a treatment for a series of debilitating or terminal conditions -- a smaller range of illnesses than California's law. A year ago, the state issued guidelines to give police and patients alike an idea of how much pot was OK: Up to 15 plants and 24 ounces of dried marijuana per patient. People can have more if they demonstrate need.
Police in some jurisdictions have applied the guidelines strictly, arresting people simply for having more than 15 plants, even if they possessed no usable marijuana. In Seattle, Satterberg issued a memo to law enforcement saying he wasn't interested in dragging sick people to court. Some other counties have also adopted a lenient view.
Washington's law says that a caregiver can only provide marijuana to one patient at any one time. In Spokane this year, medical marijuana activists focused on that language in setting up a for-profit dispensary called Change.
Lawyer Frank Cikutovich said the business met legal requirements: A lone patient would enter the store, sign a document designating the shop as his or her caregiver, and buy marijuana. The agreement expired when the patient left and the next customer came in.
The business, raided on Sept. 10, rendered the "one patient, one caregiver" rule meaningless, Spokane police spokeswoman Jennifer DeRuwe said. She said there was peripheral crime associated with the dispensary, including robberies at grow sites and street sales from people who had purchased pot there.
"They're dispensing to hundreds and thousands of people," DeRuwe said. "The police department's stand is, we want to get some guidance on this. We know it's going to be up to the court system to provide us with that."
In Western Washington, patients have instead opted for cooperatives, Seattle medical marijuana attorney Douglas Hiatt said. Those are closed membership groups. Patients pay dues or otherwise contribute on a sliding financial scale for their medicine, and some people work full time and even draw salaries under the table.
"For some people, it would be difficult to see marijuana being sold out of storefronts in their neighborhoods," Hiatt said. "But most Washington patients really haven't gone that way. They've wanted to be on the down-low, and the majority of folks are not for the California-style delivery system."
Members of one Seattle collective say it serves 2,000 patients and is primarily supplied by about a dozen grow sites, which range from a handful of mature plants to about 70 -- a few hundred plants in all, compared to the 30,000 that the patients would be allowed under the 15-plant guideline.
One of the grows is in the basement of a Seattle home surrounded by blackberries and condominiums. Dozens of starter plants fill one cramped room, while in the next a bumper crop of 15 plants is just days from yielding around 16 pounds of pot.
Setting up the grow operation with custom-built transformers, ventilation and lighting systems cost more than $50,000 -- even though union electricians donated their time. The marijuana is brought to a clinic in an industrial South Seattle neighborhood for trimming and distribution, said the HIV patient who tends the plants.

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