02-26-2020  11:43 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

'A World of Hurt': 39 States to Investigate JUUL's Marketing

Oregon is one of five states leading a bipartisan coalition looking into JUUL’s targeting of youth vaping

US Appeals Court Upholds Trump Rules Involving Abortions

The 7-4 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned decisions issued by judges in Washington, Oregon and California

Jeremy Christian Guilty of Killing 2 Who Tried to Stop His Slurs on Max

Today jurors found Christian guilty of the May 26, 2017 stabbing deaths of Taliesin Namkai-Meche and Ricky Best

States Step Up Funding for Planned Parenthood Clinics

A spokesman for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon said the agency has been "working closely with state officials to create critical backstops and protect access to care for all Oregonians who need it, regardless of federal action on Title X"

NEWS BRIEFS

State and Federal Agencies Aid Sunken Tugboat in Columbia River

Divers plugged fuel vents this afternoon and the vessel is not actively leaking ...

Multnomah County Promotes Voter Education Project

Multnomah County is partnering with National Association of Secretary of States (NASS) to promote #TRUSTEDINFO2020 ...

New Travel Ban Takes Effect, National Groups Respond

The expansion of the Muslim ban targets more Black immigrants ...

Harris, Booker Applaud House For Announcing Vote on Anti-Lynching Legislation

After passing the House, the bill will head to the president’s desk to be signed into law ...

Laugh Yourself Clean Recovery Comedy Show to be Held March 20 in Portland

Featuring Pacific Northwest comedians, the show will be held at the Clinton Street Theater ...

Pendleton gets jumi.8M emergency loan for flood-damaged levee

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The city of Pendleton will get a jumi.8 million through an emergency loan for repairs to a critical levee damaged by massive flooding in northeast Oregon earlier this month in hopes the structure can be fixed before the spring snowmelt, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said...

0M homelessness tax measure on Portland-area May ballot

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The regional government that oversees three counties in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area has voted to refer a ballot measure to voters this May that would raise 0 million a year to address chronic homelessness in the region.The government entity, Metro, voted...

OPINION

Black America is Facing a Housing Crisis

As the cost of housing soars the homeless population jumps 12 percent, the number of people renting grows and homeownership falls ...

Trump Expands Muslim Ban to Target Africans

Under the new ban on countries, four out of five people who will be excluded are Africans ...

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: Steyer says S. Carolina can alter 2020 narrative

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — The Latest on the Democratic presidential primary contest (all times local):2:35 p.m.Tom Steyer says South Carolina voters have a chance to change the narrative of the Democratic presidential race that he said is being portrayed as a choice between the extremes...

Congress makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after Till

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has approved legislation designating lynching as a hate crime under federal law. The bill, introduced by Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush and named after Till, comes 120 years after Congress first...

Neo-Nazi leaders face conspiracy charges on both coasts

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — Leaders of a neo-Nazi group have been arrested and charged in a pair of federal investigations with conspiring to harass journalists, churches and a former Cabinet official, among others, with phony bomb threats and other forms of intimidation.John C. Denton, 26, of...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: An unlikely friendship is at the heart of 'Burden'

It was only a matter of time before Hollywood came calling to adapt the real-life events surrounding a museum in South Carolina that celebrated the Ku Klux Klan.The museum opened in the mid-1990s, prompting protests. One of the Klansmen eventually had a change of heart and hands the deed to the...

Jude Law among narrators of 'Beedle the Bard' audiobook

NEW YORK (AP) — Jude Law, Warwick Davis and Evanna Lynch are among the readers in an all-star recording of J.K. Rowling's “The Tales of Beedle the Bard," the first time her Harry Potter spinoff has been available as an audiobook.Audible, the audiobook producer and distributor,...

ABC's 'For Life' hopes to change the way we see network TV

NEW YORK (AP) — Actor Nicholas Pinnock doesn't just believe his new network TV show can save lives. He believes it can save network TV, too.Pinnock stars in “For Life,” ABC's mid-season drama about a prison inmate unjustly incarcerated who becomes a lawyer. Social justice...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Spain cancels Plácido Domingo´s part in two opera dates

MADRID (AP) — The Spanish government has canceled the participation of tenor Plácido Domingo in...

Managing remote workers? It takes more than the latest apps

NEW YORK (AP) — Nicolas Vandenberghe's company has 42 staffers scattered among 36 cities in 15 countries....

Sharapova retires from tennis at age 32 with 5 Slam titles

Maria Sharapova was a transcendent star in tennis from the time she was a teenager, someone whose grit and...

Egypt holds full-honors military funeral for Mubarak

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt held a full-honors military funeral Wednesday for the country's former autocratic...

Death toll rises to 24 from Delhi riots during Trump trip

NEW DELHI (AP) — At least 24 people were killed and 189 injured in three days of clashes in New Delhi that...

Virus fears keep guests trapped in sunny 'luxurious prison'

MADRID (AP) — They signed up for a bit of a beach holiday to break up the winter. Instead, hundreds of...

McMenamins
Gene Johnson Associated Press Writer

SEATTLE (AP) -- In one corner of Washington state, a 62-year-old rheumatoid arthritis patient could face more than eight years in prison for growing marijuana for himself and three others. In Seattle, meanwhile, a collection of grow operations serves 2,000 people with little interference from police.
The discrepancy is typical of the confusion that has reigned since voters passed Washington's medical marijuana law more than a decade ago. Nor have things improved much since the state clarified how much pot patients can have last year.
Unlike some states, Washington requires patients to grow marijuana themselves or designate a caregiver to grow it for them. For many, that's unrealistic: They're too sick to grow cannabis themselves and don't have the thousands of dollars it can cost for a caregiver to set up a proper growing operation.
So they've devised their own schemes, claiming to meet the letter of the law in establishing collective grows or storefront dispensaries -- methods that are making police and prosecutors increasingly uncomfortable.
"The spirit of the law would recognize the necessity of having small cooperative ventures," said Dan Satterberg, the prosecutor in King County, where Seattle is. "But if they get past a certain size, become a magnet for neighborhood violence, or you get other people showing up to buy marijuana who are not permitted to under the law, then there's tension."
Three years ago, Satterberg's office declined to prosecute a man who was growing 130 plants for 40 people. But a case this year may be testing his tolerance: He hasn't decided whether to charge a hepatitis patient caught with 200 plants, which he claimed supplied more than 100 other patients.
Some activists and the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington recently began discussions with Seattle police over whether to limit the size of cooperative grows.
In Spokane this month, police shut down a medical marijuana dispensary -- the first such bust in the state -- and arrested the two owners. They warned a half-dozen other dispensaries to close as well, and the raid quickly drew protests from patients. The raid has set up a high-profile court fight.
Approved by voters in 1998, it allows doctors to recommend cannabis as a treatment for a series of debilitating or terminal conditions -- a smaller range of illnesses than California's law. A year ago, the state issued guidelines to give police and patients alike an idea of how much pot was OK: Up to 15 plants and 24 ounces of dried marijuana per patient. People can have more if they demonstrate need.
Police in some jurisdictions have applied the guidelines strictly, arresting people simply for having more than 15 plants, even if they possessed no usable marijuana. In Seattle, Satterberg issued a memo to law enforcement saying he wasn't interested in dragging sick people to court. Some other counties have also adopted a lenient view.
Washington's law says that a caregiver can only provide marijuana to one patient at any one time. In Spokane this year, medical marijuana activists focused on that language in setting up a for-profit dispensary called Change.
Lawyer Frank Cikutovich said the business met legal requirements: A lone patient would enter the store, sign a document designating the shop as his or her caregiver, and buy marijuana. The agreement expired when the patient left and the next customer came in.
The business, raided on Sept. 10, rendered the "one patient, one caregiver" rule meaningless, Spokane police spokeswoman Jennifer DeRuwe said. She said there was peripheral crime associated with the dispensary, including robberies at grow sites and street sales from people who had purchased pot there.
"They're dispensing to hundreds and thousands of people," DeRuwe said. "The police department's stand is, we want to get some guidance on this. We know it's going to be up to the court system to provide us with that."
In Western Washington, patients have instead opted for cooperatives, Seattle medical marijuana attorney Douglas Hiatt said. Those are closed membership groups. Patients pay dues or otherwise contribute on a sliding financial scale for their medicine, and some people work full time and even draw salaries under the table.
"For some people, it would be difficult to see marijuana being sold out of storefronts in their neighborhoods," Hiatt said. "But most Washington patients really haven't gone that way. They've wanted to be on the down-low, and the majority of folks are not for the California-style delivery system."
Members of one Seattle collective say it serves 2,000 patients and is primarily supplied by about a dozen grow sites, which range from a handful of mature plants to about 70 -- a few hundred plants in all, compared to the 30,000 that the patients would be allowed under the 15-plant guideline.
One of the grows is in the basement of a Seattle home surrounded by blackberries and condominiums. Dozens of starter plants fill one cramped room, while in the next a bumper crop of 15 plants is just days from yielding around 16 pounds of pot.
Setting up the grow operation with custom-built transformers, ventilation and lighting systems cost more than $50,000 -- even though union electricians donated their time. The marijuana is brought to a clinic in an industrial South Seattle neighborhood for trimming and distribution, said the HIV patient who tends the plants.

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