10-02-2022  1:32 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Tiny Oregon Town Hosts 1st Wind-Solar-Battery 'Hybrid' Plant

A renewable energy plant being commissioned in Oregon combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there is the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

State Senator Weighs in on Lottery Issues

Sen. James Manning of Eugene voices concerns about the Lottery’s special treatment of two of its managers

Oregon Gubernatorial Candidates Clash Over Guns, Abortion

Three candidates clashed over gun control, abortions and the homeless crisis, just six weeks before election day.

Black United Fund Launches Emerging Entrepreneur Program

Pilot program will support promising small business owner ready to take the next step.

NEWS BRIEFS

Linfield University Hosts “a Night With Syncopated Ladies”

On Oct. 5, Chloe Arnold’s Syncopated Ladies will raise the roof of Linfield University’s Richard and Lucille Ice Auditorium. ...

Sunday Marathon Will Impact Downtown Bridges

The Portland Marathon on Sunday, October 2 will impact traffic on several Willamette River bridges maintained by Multnomah...

1st Civil Trial Over Portland Cops’ Use of Force Begins

Civil rights attorneys are paying close attention because the outcome could answer questions about the potential liability the city...

Council Approves Dunn’s Proposal to Expand Hate Crime Reporting System

The King County Council approved legislation that will create a new community-based Stop Hate Hotline and online portal, expanding...

Expiring Protections: 10-Day Notices of Nonpayment of Rent And "Safe Harbor" Protections

Effective October 1, a Landlord will be able to resume use of a 72-hour notice or 144-hour notice when issuing a termination notice...

Hundreds of cars pack Nevada streets for illegal stunts

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Thousands of people in hundreds of cars took over northern Nevada parking lots and intersections Friday night and into Saturday, performing stunts in souped-up vehicles and leading to crashes and arrests, police said. Police beefed up nighttime staffing after...

Oregon issues [scripts/homepage/home.php].7M fine to electric charging company

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon environmental regulators have issued a [scripts/homepage/home.php].7 million fine to an electric charging company over accusations it sold fraudulent credits through the agency’s clean fuels program. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality said Friday it discovered...

AP Top 25 Takeaways: Bleak outlooks for Oklahoma, Wisconsin

Can't hide problems when conference play starts. The second month of the college football season often reveals issues that nonconference play might have masked and which teams could be in for long seasons. Things have quickly gotten bleak for No. 18 Oklahoma and...

No. 1 Georgia rallies from 10 down to beat Missouri 26-22

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The two most important characteristics that Georgia coach Kirby Smart seeks in his team are composure and resiliency, and the top-ranked Bulldogs needed to rely on both to rally past Missouri on Saturday night. Or, as Smart put it: “We had to OD on those.” ...

OPINION

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

Financial Fairness at Risk With Proposed TD Bank-First Horizon Merger

As banks grow larger through mergers and focus on growing online and mobile services, serious concerns emerge on how fair and how accessible banking will be to traditionally underserved Black and Latino communities. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Latvian premier's center-right party wins national election

HELSINKI (AP) — Latvia's ruling center-right party won the most votes in the country's general election, centrist parties were the runners-up and pro-Moscow parties crashed in a vote that was shaped by Russia’s war in Ukraine, according to results published Sunday. With over 99%...

Mormon leader calls abuse 'abomination' amid policy scrutiny

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Russell M. Nelson, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, told members of the faith on Saturday that abuse was “a grievous sin” that shouldn't be tolerated and would bring down the wrath of God on perpetrators. Though the leader...

Latvia's centrists are predicted to win national vote

HELSINKI (AP) — Latvia held a general election Saturday amid divisions over Russia's attack on Ukraine among the Baltic country’s sizable ethnic-Russian minority. An exit poll predicted that the center-right will win the most votes but whoever forms the next government will face huge...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Svengoolie' horror host Rich Koz gets a Halloween tribute

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rich Koz is keeping the grandly eccentric tradition of the horror movie host alive on MeTV's “Svengoolie” and can count Mark Hamill, Joe Mantegna and, just maybe, Lady Gaga among his fans. But it's a compliment he received from Rick Baker, a seven-time Oscar...

Trevor Noah says he's exiting as host of 'The Daily Show'

NEW YORK (AP) — Trevor Noah says that he's leaving “The Daily Show” as host, after seven years of a Trump and pandemic-filled tenure on the weeknight Comedy Central show. Noah surprised the studio audience during Thursday's taping, dropping the news after discussing his...

Loewe bowls over Paris Fashion Week; tribute to Miyake

PARIS (AP) — Loewe’s ever-creative director, Jonathan Anderson, became the toast of Paris Fashion Week on Friday with his subtly provocative, concept-driven runway show triumph that had critics and VIP guests, including Karlie Kloss and Alexa Chung, bowled over. Meanwhile, U.S....

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Amid crises, rural roots anchor Southern Baptists’ president

FARMERSVILLE, Texas (AP) — On the first Saturday of fall, a sweating Bart Barber trekked across a weedy pasture...

Poor Florida neighborhood battered by flood tries to recover

HARLEM HEIGHTS, Fla. (AP) — The Gladiolus Food Pantry usually hands out supplies on Wednesdays to about 240...

Exit poll: Center-right GERB party will win Bulgarian vote

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — An exit poll in Bulgaria suggested Sunday that the center-right GERB party of ex-premier...

Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking

HELSINKI (AP) — Authorities in Denmark said Sunday that the Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipelines have also...

Glitzy Valentino show sees Paris Fashion Week at fever pitch

PARIS (AP) — Valentino’s Paris fashion show on Sunday saw snared lines of black cars dropping off battalions...

Intl overseer changes voting rules in Bosnia

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Shortly after polls closed in Bosnia’s general election on Sunday, the top...

Jon Marcus the Hechinger Report

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Bahiya Nasuuna hasn't even started college, but she already has several academic credits in the bank that will give her a jump on graduation.

"My parents need as much help as they can get [to cover tuition]," said Nasuuna, who will be attending the University of Massachusetts, Amherst this fall.

Nasuuna passed seven Advanced Placement exams at her public high school in Chelsea, Mass., including one in English that will allow her to forgo an introductory writing course her freshman year.

She is one of a growing number of students getting a head start on college credits while they are still in high school, cutting costs and speeding toward degrees -- and jobs -- as quickly as possible.

But it's not just about taking AP tests. High school students are also enrolling in college courses, receiving college credit for life experiences, such as community service or being able to speak a foreign language, or even skipping their junior or senior year altogether to attend so-called "early colleges."

"Everyone is looking for a leg up," said Dave Taylor, principal of the Dayton Early College Academy in Ohio, a charter high school where students simultaneously enroll in classes at nearby Sinclair Community College and start earning college credits as early as their sophomore year.

Some 1.3 million students took classes for university credit before completing high school during the 2010-2011 academic year, up 67% since 2003, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

Much of this trend is being driven by the skyrocketing cost of college. Students enrolled in early college high schools, for example, earn an average of 36 college credits, nearly a third the number they'll need for a bachelor's degree, according to a study by the advocacy group Jobs for the Future.

But there's also evidence that exposing high school students to the challenges of college-level work can increase their eventual likelihood of success.

More students who take college-level courses in high school go on to college than their classmates who don't, a report released in June by the American Institutes for Research, or AIR, found.

They're also more likely than their peers to stay in college once they get there, earn higher grades, and eventually graduate, according to a separate study conducted in Florida and New York by the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University.

"What we hear from kids all the time is, 'It's amazing to me that I can sit in a college classroom with 22-year-olds,'" Taylor said. "When you're actually doing college work, it ups the ante quite a bit, so they feel like they can compete and be successful wherever they might choose to go."

Most college courses that are offered in high schools are taught by faculty from two-year community colleges under so-called dual-enrollment partnerships. They're conducted either in the high schools themselves or at close-by higher-education institutions.

In Oregon and Colorado, some students can take a fifth year of high school, using it to earn credits at nearby community colleges. Since they're technically still enrolled in their local school districts their tuition, fees, and textbooks are paid for by state funding for public-school education.

The universities and colleges have motivations of their own for going to this extra trouble. "They know they would otherwise get students who are unprepared, who end up in remedial courses, or who don't graduate," said Joel Vargas, vice president of Jobs for the Future.

High school students can also take the College Level Examination Program test, or CLEP, and if it shows they've mastered any of 33 different college-level subjects from what they've learned in jobs, through community service or because they're fluent in a language other than English, they can submit the results for prospective college credit.

This doesn't mean that every university or college will accept all of the credits students earn, though a survey by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education found that 92% of public institutions nationwide give credit for at least some dual-enrollment courses and 91% for AP exams.

An added benefit from doing college-level work in high school is that it allows students to experience what higher education is like while still living at home.

"What we're seeing more of now is a greater emphasis on programs that are smoothing over the college transition," said Adam Lowe, executive director of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships.

On the opposite extreme are early colleges that put 10th or 11th graders who have outgrown what their high school can offer them into college courses and directly on the fast track to a degree, with a high school diploma conferred along the way. All are private, and charge the usual college tuition.

"Students talk about how relatively isolated they felt in their sending schools because they were interested in Plato and their classmates were interested in the five-paragraph essay," said Peter Laipson, provost at Bard College at Simon's Rock, which enrolls students as young as 16.

But whether they end up going to a four-year university or a community college, these high school students are smart enough to know they're saving themselves and their families a lot of money.

"Certainly we hear that anecdotally -- that I got this almost for free," said Andrea Berger, who led the research work at AIR. "And certainly they are getting [a degree] for less money."

 

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events