04-20-2024  4:23 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Don’t Shoot Portland, University of Oregon Team Up for Black Narratives, Memory

The yearly Memory Work for Black Lives Plenary shows the power of preservation.

Grants Pass Anti-Camping Laws Head to Supreme Court

Grants Pass in southern Oregon has become the unlikely face of the nation’s homelessness crisis as its case over anti-camping laws goes to the U.S. Supreme Court scheduled for April 22. The case has broad implications for cities, including whether they can fine or jail people for camping in public. Since 2020, court orders have barred Grants Pass from enforcing its anti-camping laws. Now, the city is asking the justices to review lower court rulings it says has prevented it from addressing the city's homelessness crisis. Rights groups say people shouldn’t be punished for lacking housing.

Four Ballot Measures for Portland Voters to Consider

Proposals from the city, PPS, Metro and Urban Flood Safety & Water Quality District.

Washington Gun Store Sold Hundreds of High-Capacity Ammunition Magazines in 90 Minutes Without Ban

KGW-TV reports Wally Wentz, owner of Gator’s Custom Guns in Kelso, described Monday as “magazine day” at his store. Wentz is behind the court challenge to Washington’s high-capacity magazine ban, with the help of the Silent Majority Foundation in eastern Washington.

NEWS BRIEFS

Governor Kotek Announces Chief of Staff, New Office Leadership

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Governor Kotek Announces Investment in New CHIPS Child Care Fund

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Bank Announces 14th Annual “I Got Bank” Contest for Youth in Celebration of National Financial Literacy Month

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Literary Arts Transforms Historic Central Eastside Building Into New Headquarters

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Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Announces New Partnership with the University of Oxford

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The drug war devastated Black and other minority communities. Is marijuana legalization helping?

ARLINGTON, Wash. (AP) — When Washington state opened some of the nation's first legal marijuana stores in 2014, Sam Ward Jr. was on electronic home detention in Spokane, where he had been indicted on federal drug charges. He would soon be off to prison to serve the lion's share of a four-year...

Firefighters douse a blaze at a historic Oregon hotel famously featured in 'The Shining'

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Two-time world champ J’den Cox retires at US Olympic wrestling trials; 44-year-old reaches finals

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) — J’den Cox walked off the mat after dropping a 2-2 decision to Kollin Moore at the U.S. Olympic wrestling trials on Friday night, leaving his shoes behind to a standing ovation. The bronze medal winner at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in 2016 was beaten by...

University of Missouri plans 0 million renovation of Memorial Stadium

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The University of Missouri is planning a 0 million renovation of Memorial Stadium. The Memorial Stadium Improvements Project, expected to be completed by the 2026 season, will further enclose the north end of the stadium and add a variety of new premium...

OPINION

Op-Ed: Why MAGA Policies Are Detrimental to Black Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE – MAGA proponents peddle baseless claims of widespread voter fraud to justify voter suppression tactics that disproportionately target Black voters. From restrictive voter ID laws to purging voter rolls to limiting early voting hours, these...

Loving and Embracing the Differences in Our Youngest Learners

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Gallup Finds Black Generational Divide on Affirmative Action

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OP-ED: Embracing Black Men’s Voices: Rebuilding Trust and Unity in the Democratic Party

The decision of many Black men to disengage from the Democratic Party is rooted in a complex interplay of historical disenchantment, unmet promises, and a sense of disillusionment with the political establishment. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The drug war devastated Black and other minority communities. Is marijuana legalization helping?

ARLINGTON, Wash. (AP) — When Washington state opened some of the nation's first legal marijuana stores in 2014, Sam Ward Jr. was on electronic home detention in Spokane, where he had been indicted on federal drug charges. He would soon be off to prison to serve the lion's share of a four-year...

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FREEPORT, N.Y. (AP) — Weihua Yan had seen dramatic demographic changes since moving to Long Island's Nassau County. Its Asian American population alone had grown by 60% since the 2010 census. Why then, he wondered, did he not see anyone who looked like him on the county's local...

USC cancels graduation keynote by filmmaker amid controversy over decision to drop student's speech

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ENTERTAINMENT

Celebrity birthdays for the week of April 21-27

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U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Biden administration restricts oil and gas leasing in 13 million acres of Alaska's petroleum reserve

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Lawsuits under New York's new voting rights law reveal racial disenfranchisement even in blue states

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By Sarah Brown CNN








Born and raised in India, I moved to the USA three years ago to pursue my undergraduate education. Like Cross, I studied abroad in the fall of 2012. My chosen destination was Paris. Upon my return, I told family in India and friends from around the world exactly what they expected to hear. I told them I was in love -- in love with Paris. I did indeed relish the experience of living in a country whose culture and language is so different from my own. However, I fell short of mentioning the time I was harassed by a drunk man at the Gare Montparnasse, while numerous people simply stood and watched, the time I was groped by a man on a bus who threatened to follow me home, or the time I was actually followed back home from my afternoon run at Champ des Mars.     

Shaheen Madraswala


When Michaela Cross, a U.S. student at the University of Chicago, posted a CNN iReport about the sexual harassment she says she experienced during a study abroad trip in India, the response was overwhelming.

Cross' story, which is now the most-viewed iReport of all time, spawned thousands of impassioned comments and responses, many from women who live in India or who had traveled there and who wished to share their own experiences.

"This is a side of India that is a reality to most young women who reside here -- or for that matter travel here," said Meera Vijayann, 27, from Bangalore in India.

"I wish I could take your pain away," said Anaka Kaundinya, 22, from Mumbai.

Sexual harassment remains a pervasive problem in Indian society. Often referred to by the euphemism "Eve-teasing," a 2011 survey supported by UN Women found 95 percent of females in New Delhi said they felt unsafe in public places.

Earlier this year the country introduced stricter anti-rape laws following the fatal gang rape of a young woman in New Delhi, but gender inequality remains embedded within Indian society. As reports of another gang rape emerged in the Indian city of Mumbai on Friday, the issue remains as pertinent as ever.

While Cross has garnered attention for speaking up about her experience, she's not alone. Four women with connections to India shared their own experiences, whether they felt it fair to single out India on the issue, and how best to tackle the problem.

Please note that CNN cannot independently verify the incidents described below.

Shwetha Kalyanasundara, 27, business development professional from Chennai

When I read Cross' article I was ashamed of my country (for the first time). But I realized that I cannot sit in my comfortable space and watch people tear my country down.

Almost every woman who grows up in India has been subjected to some kind of sexual innuendos ... but for every man who cannot control his libido and gives in to his over-crazed sexual drive, I can assure you that there will be 10 men who will fight for you and your dignity.

In Sanskrit, we say "Matha, Pitha, Guru, Deivam" (translated: Mother, Father, Teacher, God). The meaning of this adage is the greatest truth and is the order in which we offer reverence. This is the basic tenet in existence from time immemorial, and every man has been taught to place the womankind even above God.

Indian men know to treat their women with respect. And I cannot tolerate your generalization that Indian men are bad. You cannot blame the entire male population for the actions of few.

In all the countries I have been to, I have been subjected to roving eyes and sexual overtures from men. I have been leered and heckled by cab drivers and pedestrians alike. Even a middle-aged woman is not spared.

Let's not be too dramatic here and accept that sexual crimes against women are a problem the world over.




Shaheen Madraswala, 22, student at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, grew up in Mumbai

Born and raised in India, I moved to the USA three years ago to pursue my undergraduate education. Like Cross, I studied abroad in the fall of 2012. My chosen destination was Paris.

Upon my return, I told family in India and friends from around the world exactly what they expected to hear. I told them I was in love -- in love with Paris. I did indeed relish the experience of living in a country whose culture and language is so different from my own.

However, I fell short of mentioning the time I was harassed by a drunk man at the Gare Montparnasse, while numerous people simply stood and watched, the time I was groped by a man on a bus who threatened to follow me home, or the time I was actually followed back home from my afternoon run at Champ des Mars.

This, unfortunately, is a woman's plight, wherever in the world she might be. Although an Indian women who is expected to be used to the staring and teasing, I am not prepared. I am not prepared to look over my shoulder after sunset. I am not prepared to think twice before using public transport. I am not prepared for the reactions that my clothing might elicit.

Having lived in three of the world's megacities, Bombay, Paris and New York, I have been equally unprepared wherever I might be, for the simple reason that I am a woman. The pervasiveness of sexual harassment is global.

Aishwarya Subramanian, 25, reporter from Bangalore

A lot of us in India ... feel a collective responsibility for what happened to Cross and feel terrible for what's happened to her.

But I also think it is terribly unfair to turn every man in India into a monster. It also hurts to read comments where people urge others to stay away from this beautiful country.

As someone who lives here every day of her life, it hurts when someone says "if you have white skin, you should stay away from India." It's this kind of racist bigotry we should try and overcome.

Yes. Unfortunately I have been groped at and harassed by men. I am a runner and every time I set out to run by myself, I make sure I have my phone with me and pepper spray in case men on the streets decide to harass the girl running in sweatpants (I never wear my shorts on solo runs).

But that's not what the country is all about. It's a big nation that should not be generalized. In any city you will find millions talking different languages, following different cultures. You simply cannot speak for all of them in one breath. It's not possible in India.

I think sexual harassment is a global problem, and it's something women have to live with every day of their lives. It's unfortunately as bad as it gets in India. I really do believe that there needs to be mass education to help change attitudes toward women.

Sanjana Govindarajan, 21, student from Mumbai

Reading line after line of Cross' story filled me with an overwhelming sense of shame. I have been stared at, leered at, groped and followed by strangers for close to 11 years of my life. And yet, I feel ashamed before I feel indignant.

I believe the poor treatment of women and their sexual objectification is endemic in Indian society today. Children might be taught to treat women with respect in their classrooms, however, most of them go back home to see the exact opposite in implementation by members of their families.

It appears to be a fairly daunting and uphill task to go about educating a billion-plus population about the importance of proper treatment of women, and in a way that translates into meaningful change in the society. But it needs to happen.

Stricter laws would be an essential part of the solution. Police apathy and in some cases, blatant disregard for the plight of the victims only encourages and empowers this disgusting behavior.

I think it is most important for women to come out and speak about the issue. We have grown up being taught to remain silent about sexual abuse. I think one of the most significant changes one can bring about in this situation is to remove the shame attached to being a victim of sexual abuse.

If we talk about it more, millions of women will draw strength from speaking the truth and will come closer to being liberated.

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast