10-15-2021  2:34 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Set to Expand Hotline for Bias Crime Reporting

With a rise in hate crimes and bias incidents in Oregon and nationwide the two-person office just couldn’t handle the volume.

Portland Shootings Prompt DA to Spend $1M to Handle Cases

Multnomah County plans to hire four prosecutors and two investigators to help with an increasing caseload of homicide investigations

Cascadia Whole Health Honors Community Justice Leader, Fine Artist with Culture of Caring Awards

Erika Preuitt and Jeremy Okai Davis recognized for positive contributions to community.

Salem-Keizer School Boards Adopts Anti-Racism Resolution

The Salem-Keizer school board has voted to adopt a resolution outlining the board’s commitment to equity and anti-racism.

NEWS BRIEFS

Nearly 100 Animals Seized From Woofin Palooza Forfeited to MCAS

A Multnomah County Circuit Court judge has ruled that dogs and cats seized from an unlicensed facility named Woofin Palooza are now...

City of Seattle Office and Sound Transit Finalize No-Cost Land Transfer for Affordable Housing Development

Rainier Valley Homeownership Initiative will create at least 100 for-sale homes, permanently affordable to low- and moderate-income...

Sierra Club Reacts to Rep. Schrader’s Comments on Climate Change

Schrader Calls Climate Change “biggest threat to Americans” after voting against key policy in committee ...

Darrell Grant Is Restoring Portland’s Soul With Albina Pop-up Studio

After a summer of bringing artistic collaborations to the city’s North Park blocks and Tilikum Plaza, Darrell Grant continues The...

Oregon Consumer Advisory Council recruiting new members

The Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Consumer Activities is pleased to announce a recruitment for openings on the Oregon Consumer...

Legionnaires outbreak persists at Portland apartment complex

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Officials have confirmed that a North Portland apartment complex had a new case of Legionnaires’ disease in late September, the latest in an outbreak attributed to the waterborne illness since January. The Multnomah County Health Department said the...

Alleged leader of drug trafficking ring pleads not guilty

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) — A Longview, Washington man has pleaded not guilty to charges of leading and profiting from organized crime. Efrein Velarde Pelayo, 33, is accused of sending a runner to sell heroin and methamphetamines to a police informant last winter. The Daily News...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

No. 21 Texas A&M tries to avoid 'Bama hangover at Mizzou

Jimbo Fisher opened his weekly news conference going through everything that Texas A&M did well the previous week, when the Aggies stunned then-No. 1 Alabama before a raucous crowd at Kyle Field. It was a long list. So it wasn't surprising that by the end...

OPINION

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Waters Statement on 20th Anniversary of September 11 Attacks

Twenty years ago today, our nation suffered devastating terrorist attacks on our soil and against our people that wholly and completely changed the world as we knew it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New York's likely new mayor plans to preserve gifted program

NEW YORK (AP) — The Democrat who will likely become New York City's next mayor says he does not intend to get rid of the city's program for gifted and talented students, nipping plans that outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio just announced. Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams...

Southern Baptist leader resigns amid rifts over sex abuse

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A top Southern Baptist Convention administrator is resigning amid internal rifts over how to handle an investigation into the SBC's response to sexual abuse, a decision that underscores the broader ongoing turmoil in the nation’s largest Protestant denomination. ...

Column: Imagine what else lurks in those 650,000 emails

Just imagine what else lurks in those 650,000 emails. Surely the racism and misogyny and homophobia weren't a Jon Gruden exclusive. But the NFL, instead of thoroughly addressing what is likely just the tip of a very toxic iceberg, hopes we'll all just meekly...

ENTERTAINMENT

Film TV workers union says strike to start next week

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The union representing film and television crews says its 60,000 members will begin a nationwide strike on Monday if it does not reach a deal that satisfies demands for fair and safe working conditions. A strike would bring a halt to...

Gary Paulsen, celebrated children's author, dies at 82

NEW YORK (AP) — Gary Paulsen, the acclaimed and prolific children's author who often drew upon his rural affinities and wide-ranging adventures for tales that included “Hatchet,” “Brian's Winter” and “Dogsong,” has died at age 82. Random House Children's Books...

Todd Haynes: Finding the frequency of the Velvet Underground

The most often-repeated thing said about the Velvet Underground is Brian Eno’s quip that the band didn’t sell many records, but everyone who bought one started a band. You won’t hear that line in Todd Haynes’ documentary “The Velvet Underground,” nor will you see a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Suicide attack on Shiite mosque in Afghanistan kills 47

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Suicide bombers attacked a Shiite mosque packed with worshippers attending Friday...

Judge firms up trial date for Smollett, won't dismiss case

CHICAGO (AP) — A judge on Friday denied a last-ditch effort to dismiss a criminal case against actor Jussie...

States can reserve COVID-19 shots for younger kids next week

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials are setting the stage for a national COVID-19 vaccination campaign for...

The Latest: Nevada concerned by rural vaccination rates

RENO, Nev. — Nevada health officials say rural areas with low vaccination rates remain the biggest concern, but...

Cyprus to revoke 'golden passports' granted to 45 people

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Cyprus' government has started procedures to revoke citizenship granted to 39 foreign...

More repression, fewer jobs: Jordanians face bleak outlook

AMMAN, Jordan (AP) — As a poorly paid public school teacher, Khaled Jaber always needed a side hustle, working...

By Ben Brumfield and Greg Botelho CNN



The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing has been moved from a Boston medical center to a federal Bureau of Prisons hospital about 40 miles away.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been receiving treatment for a variety of wounds at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center since his capture nearly a week ago.

He is now at Federal Medical Center Devens, U.S. Marshals Service spokesman Drew Wade said Friday.

The prison hospital, located on the grounds of the former Fort Devens military base, is designed to house prisoners requiring ongoing medical care, according to the facility's website.

Tsarnaev, 19, was captured April 19 after a nearly 24-hour manhunt. According to the criminal complaint accusing him in the bombing, he had what appeared to be gunshot wounds to his head, neck, legs and hand. His brother, Tamerlan, died after a gun battle with police last week.

Authorities say the Tsarnaevs were responsible for twin blasts on April 15 that killed three people and injured more than 260, 14 of whom had limbs amputated.

Some of the wounded were treated at Beth Israel Deaconess, and were upset that the suspect in the bombing also was being treated there, a doctor with colleagues at the hospital told CNN's Elizabeth Cohen. Some felt anxiety and fear knowing the suspect in the bombing was in the building, the doctor said.

As of Thursday evening, 34 of the wounded were still being treated at Boston hospitals, including one patient in critical condition.

A law enforcement official told CNN Thursday that at least one of the two bombs, the second to explode, was detonated by remote control.

Spontaneous plan to attack New York City

On Thursday, officials revealed that New York City was the next target for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. It was a spontaneous idea, Tsarnaev told investigators from his hospital bed.

But a botched carjacking spoiled the impromptu road trip to Times Square, Tsarnaev said. They still had six improvised bombs at the time.

"We don't know that we would have been able to stop the terrorists had they arrived here from Boston," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. "We're just thankful that we didn't have to find out that answer."

Before forcing their way into the vehicle the night of April 18, the brothers shot dead a campus police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, police said.

The hijacked vehicle, a Mercedes SUV, ran low on fuel and they stopped at a service station, where the vehicle's owner escaped. Shortly thereafter, police picked up the trail of the SUV. A pursuit followed, during which, authorities say, the men were throwing the bombs out the vehicle's window at them. The gun battle and Tamerlan Tsarnaev's death followed.

A previous trip

There is no evidence that New York City remains a target of a terror attack stemming from the Boston bombings, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said. Still, he said authorities are investigating two visits that the surviving suspect made to New York City last year.

In one of those trips, in April 2012, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was photographed in Times Square. Another person pictured in that photo has been in federal custody for seven days on alleged visa violations.

Federal agents detained that man and another person after swarming Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth residence hall during the search for him on April 19.

The two are foreign exchange students from Kazakhstan enrolled at the Dartmouth campus. Neither has been linked to the attack, but investigators hope they can better piece together the suspects' movements before and after the marathon.

"These guys are not being cut loose immediately, and there's a reason why," the federal law enforcement source said.

Father's visit delayed

Meanwhile the Tsarnaev brothers' parents have left their home in Dagestan for another part of Russia, their mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaev, told CNN Friday.

She said the suspects' father, Anzor Tsarnaev, is delaying his planned trip to the United States indefinitely.

She told CNN's Nick Paton Walsh that her husband was delaying the trip for health reasons. She wouldn't elaborate.

Anzor Tsarnaev had earlier agreed to fly to the United States after FBI agents and Russian officials spoke with them for hours this week at the family's home.

The mother also will not be flying to the United States, where she is wanted on felony charges of shoplifting and destruction of property.

The family lived in Massachusetts before Zubeidat Tsarnaev jumped bail after her arrest on the charges in 2012. The parents moved to Dagestan that year.

Sources: Russia raised concerns about mother, son

Zubeidat and Tamerlan Tsarnaev had previously fallen under the suspicion of Russian authorities concerned they were following radical ideologies.

Russian authorities had raised concerns to U.S. authorities about her and her son, sources told CNN. But a U.S. official said that the Russian's case at the time was "thin."

Zubeidat Tsarnaev said the FBI had visited her family "several times" in 2011 with questions about her older son's "Islamic interests."

U.S. authorities did add Zubeidat Tsarnaev and her older son to the Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment, or TIDE, database in 2011 -- a collection of more than a half million names maintained by the National Counterterrorism Center, an intelligence official said.

Zubeidat Tsarnaev told CNN on Thursday that she didn't want to accept the reality of the bombing, saying it was fake. She has seen a video pushing the wild idea, she said, adding that there was no blood and that paint was used instead.

Nonetheless, she broke down when she spoke of the victims.

"I really feel sorry for all of them. Really feel sorry for all of them," she said, her voice cracking even as she remained resolute that her sons were not involved.

The Tsarnaevs are originally from the embattled Russian republic of Chechnya but fled from the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan and moved at different times to the United States.

Putin: 'We were right'

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday urged closer cooperation between other countries' security services in the wake of the Boston attack.

"If we combine our efforts, we will not suffer blows like that," he said during a live televised call-in session in Moscow on Thursday.

In his first on-camera comments since the bombing, Putin also lashed out against those in the West who have slammed Russia for human rights abuses in its actions toward Chechnya.

"Russia is among the first victims, and I hate it when our Western partners call our terrorists -- who committed some heinous crimes in Russia -- when they call them freedom fighters and never call them terrorists. They supported them," said Putin, accusing unnamed people or groups of providing Russia's foes with political, financial and "media" support.

U.S. authorities have come under fire at home, with lawmakers asking if the FBI and CIA failed to share information. Sources told CNN that Russia had separately asked the FBI and the CIA to look into Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011.

CNN's Drew Griffin, Dave Alsup, Carol Cratty, Nick Paton Walsh, Brian Todd, Barbara Starr, Susan Candiotti and Ben Brumfield contributed to this report.

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