10-28-2021  3:23 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Report Faults WA Sheriff Over Confrontation With Black Man

An investigation has found a sheriff in Washington state violated policies against bias-free policing and other standards during a controversial encounter with a Black newspaper carrier.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown Gets COVID-19 Vaccine Booster

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown received a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot and encouraged other eligible Oregonians to discuss booster shots with doctors.

King County's Proof of COVID Vaccine Policy Starts Monday

Beginning Monday proof of vaccination or a negative test for COVID-19 will be required to enter restaurants, bars, gyms, theaters or entertainment venues in Washington state's most populous county.

N.E. Portland Glass Recycler Reaches Deal with DEQ to Curb Pollution

A glass recycling plant in northeast Portland has consented to either shut down or install pollution control technology, according to an agreement announced between the plant’s operators and the state of Oregon

NEWS BRIEFS

Ex-NYT Columnist Kristof Announces Run for Oregon Governor

Former New York Times reporter and columnist Nicholas Kristof announced Wednesday he is running for governor of Oregon ...

Strickland Amendment to Strengthen Workplace Equity for Women & Mothers Passes House

Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland, a member of the Black Maternal Health Caucus and a Leader in the Pro-Choice Caucus, released the...

Join Portland Parks & Recreation at a Family-Friendly Tree Planting Kickoff Event and Arbor Day Celebration

Arts and crafts, hundreds of tree plantings in SE Portland’s Lents Park and neighborhood ...

Retired Marine Corps Lieutenant General to Speak About Cyber Trends and National Security

Retired Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Lori Reynolds will deliver a virtual presentation sponsored by Oregon State University at 4 p.m. Oct....

Power Outages Continue in Northwest Following Wind Storm

Utilities in the Portland area listed about 3,000 customers without power. ...

US park service, tourism group partner to highlight tribes

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The National Park Service has partnered with a tourism association to ensure the contributions, cultures and traditions of Native Americans are incorporated into exhibits and programming at sites across the country. The park service says it highlights...

Ex-NYT columnist Kristof announces run for Oregon governor

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Former New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof announced his candidacy Wednesday for Oregon governor, saying the state needs a political newbie to solve problems like homelessness and rural despair. “I've never run for political office in my life,”...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

OPINION

Letter to the Editor: About the UN Climate Change Conference

Global leaders have failed to take the action necessary to avert climate disaster and Oregon leadership is scant better. ...

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

South Africa's de Kock apologizes, will take knee in future

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — South African cricket player Quinton de Kock will take a knee after all. De Kock apologized Thursday to teammates and supporters for refusing to play in a T20 World Cup game, but said he felt his rights were “taken away” when players were...

Larson out front as face of Hendrick charitable initiatives

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Kyle Larson stepped out of the spotlight during last year's NASCAR suspension and quietly turned his attention to charitable efforts for communities in need. Each initiative was an eye-opener for Larson, who wanted to educate himself on social issues...

India Walton beat Buffalo's mayor once. Can she do it again?

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — When India Walton beat Buffalo’s four-term mayor in a Democratic primary last June, New York’s second largest city looked like it was about to get a leader like no other in its history. She’d be its first female mayor and the first to identify as a...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Dune' to get sequel, with theater-only release set for 2023

“Dune” isn't done. Legendary Entertainment announced Tuesday that Denis Villeneuve's “Dune," which adapts the first half of Frank Herbert's 1965 science-fiction epic, will get a sequel. Whether that would be the case had been an unanswered question throughout the film's...

Potential legal woes mount after 'Rust' shooting tragedy

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Alec Baldwin the actor, who pulled the trigger on a prop gun while filming “Rust” in New Mexico and unwittingly killed a cinematographer and injured a director, likely won’t be held criminally or civilly liable for the tragedy. But Alec Baldwin the...

Mort Sahl, comedian who satirized politics, dies at 94

NEW YORK (AP) — Satirist Mort Sahl, who helped revolutionize stand-up comedy during the Cold War with his running commentary on politicians and current events and became a favorite of a new, restive generation of Americans, died Tuesday. He was 94. His friend Lucy Mercer said...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Exacerbated by pandemic, child care crisis hampers economy

SEATTLE (AP) — After Bryan Kang’s son was born in July, the occupational therapist and his wife, a teacher,...

America 'on fire': Facebook watched as Trump ignited hate

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The reports of hateful and violent posts on Facebook started pouring in on the night of...

Minneapolis mayor faces voters with policing on their minds

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey was the face of the city through some of its darkest days —...

EU court tells Poland to pay jumi.2M a day in judicial dispute

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union raised the stakes Wednesday in a standoff with Poland over judicial...

La Palma island braces for more quakes as volcano roars on

LOS LLANOS DE ARIDANE, Canary Islands (AP) — Residents on Spain’s La Palma island braced Wednesday for the...

France threatens to block British fishing boats from ports

PARIS (AP) — France announced Wednesday that it will bar British fishing boats from some French ports starting...

Mike Mount CNN

(CNN) -- More prisoners have joined a hunger strike at the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The number of suspected terrorists involved has risen to 24 as of Tuesday, Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Todd Breasseale said.

There were 14 last week. U.S. military officials deny detainee lives are in danger.

Breasseale said eight require feeding tubes that are administered through the mouth.

There are 166 suspected terrorists being held at the detention facility.

"The medical staff continuously monitors and provides outstanding medical care to detainees in our custody," Breasseale said.

"The health and well-being of detainees is their primary mission and they take this duty as seriously as they would a duty to treat our own service members or any patient in their care," he said.

Beginning last year through mid-February, between five and six detainees started and stopped hunger strikes, Breasseale said.

But the numbers grew after lawyers for some of the detainees drew attention to conditions at the facility, Breasseale said.

"The reports of hunger-strike related deteriorating health and detainees losing massive amounts of weight are simply untrue," Breasseale said.

David Remes, a Washington-based lawyer who represents 15 detainees at Guantanamo, said his February visit shocked him.

"I think every one of the clients I saw had lost 30 pounds or more when I was there," Remes said. "They were weak and chilled."

Remes said two of his clients were unable to meet because they were too weak from their hunger strike. He said he knows that at least six of his clients are participating.

He said his clients told him the strikes were "the last straw" in response to what was described as more intrusive treatment in recent months.

For instance, his clients were unhappy with an early February search of detainee personal items and an intent to search Korans, something that had stopped in 2006.

"It is incredibly insulting to Islam as far as these men are concerned, most of whom are very devout Muslims, and it seems to be solely to demonstrate the administration's (Guantanamo commanders) power and not on a justification basis," Remes said.

He said checking Korans pushed them toward the hunger strike but other incidents stoked their anger.

In one last January, a guard in a watch tower shot at a group of detainees who had gathered to complain about another issue.

"Rarely does what is relayed to defense counsel by the detainees, which some members of the defense council then dutifully take to the press, match with reality," Breasseale said in response.

"This is another example of myth-making by the detainees. Only after detainees attempted to climb the fence and then hurled stones at the guards in the tower, was a single shot fired and only after reasonable cause, was a cell ever searched," according to Breasseale.

Last Thursday, Remes and more than 50 other lawyers who represent detainees at Guantanamo wrote to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, complaining that they have been receiving reports by detainees that the, "health of the men has continued to deteriorate in alarming and potentially irreparable ways."

The letter asks Hagel to meet with the lawyers to work out a solution.

 

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