10-24-2021  6:25 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland-Based Footwear Designer Plans to Reopen the Only HBCU in Michigan

Dr. D'Wayne Edwards, a Portland-based designer, announced his plans to reopen the Lewis College of Business, the defunct HBCU in Detroit. 

$2.1M Penalty for Roofing Company Over Emission Violations

Malarkey Roofing Products was penalized after the company disclosed it may have been emitting a large amount of formaldehyde, a suspected carcinogen, since 2009.

Tool for Police Reform Rarely Used by Local Prosecutors

Brady Lists flag officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct – a designation that must be shared with defense attorneys. Defense attorneys, public defenders, civil rights groups and some prosecutors are calling for an increased use of the lists.

Portland Parks & Recreation’s Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center (IFCC) Proposed as a Center for Black Arts and Culture

Feasibility Study for community-led vision moving forward thanks to Parks Local Option Levy

NEWS BRIEFS

Bootcamp for Prep Cooks Supplies Ingredients for Entry Into Food Service Career

Individuals interested in starting a career in food service have an exciting new choice – Prep Cook Bootcamp ...

WA BLM Demands Resignation of Criminally-charged Sheriff Troyer

"He is being charged with two crimes: false reporting and making a false statement when he said that newspaper deliverer Sedrick...

'A Dangerous Time': Portland Sees Record Homicides

Unlike previous years, more bystanders are being caught in the crossfire — from people mourning at vigils and sitting in cars to...

State Agency Inadvertently Releases Employees Vaccine Status

Oregon’s central administrative agency inadvertently released the COVID-19 vaccination status of more than 40,000 state employees to...

Simple Safety Tips for Trick-or-Treating After Fauci Greenlighted Halloween 2021

Halloween 2020 brought creative ways to trick or treat while minimizing the spread of infection (

Oregon State researcher suspected of sex crimes in Virginia

CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon State University faculty researcher has been arrested on suspicion of sex crimes allegedly committed in Virginia. The Corvallis Gazette-Times reports that 66-year-old Brett Tyler was booked into Benton County Jail on Thursday, Oct. 7. ...

Transgender council member likely first in Washington state

ABERDEEN, Wash. (AP) — A crowd is pouring into a parking lot on Broadway Street in Aberdeen. People in booths are hawking homemade goods. There’s rainbow flags. Tweens with kitchen-sink dye jobs. Old folks and strollers. Everyone is cheering for the drag performers...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

OPINION

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Waters Statement on 20th Anniversary of September 11 Attacks

Twenty years ago today, our nation suffered devastating terrorist attacks on our soil and against our people that wholly and completely changed the world as we knew it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Zimbabwe's Dangarembga receives German peace prize

VIENNA (AP) — Accepting a prestigious German prize Sunday in honor of her work, Zimbabwean writer and filmmaker Tsitsi Dangarembga called for a “new Enlightenment,” saying a fundamental shift is needed to overcome the structures of racial hierarchy that have led to violence in her home...

Race-blind redistricting? Democrats incredulous at GOP maps

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A decade ago, North Carolina Republicans redrew their legislative districts to help their party in a way that a federal court ruled illegally deprived Black voters of their right to political representation. A state court later struck down Republican-drawn maps as based on...

Oklahoma lawmaker criticized for Asian American comment

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A Republican Oklahoma state senator is drawing criticism for referring to Asian Americans as “yellow families” during a legislative committee meeting on racial inequity. Sen. Dave Rader of Tulsa made the comment Wednesday to Oklahoma Policy Institute...

ENTERTAINMENT

In memoir, Katie Couric writes of feeling betrayed by Lauer

NEW YORK (AP) — On a summer day in the Hamptons last year, Katie Couric and her husband, John Molner, went out for a walk and saw a familiar white jeep drive by with Matt Lauer at the wheel. No waves, no hellos. Couric writes in her new memoir, “Going There,” that she...

Review: 'Ron's Gone Wrong' has the movie code all jumbled

There's a clear message in the new film “Ron’s Gone Wrong” and that message is to stop watching films like “Ron’s Gone Wrong.” A derivative tale about a middle schooler and his quirky computer sidekick, the animated film seems to want to preach we should all...

Caro exhibit 'Turn the Page' is a window into his world

NEW YORK (AP) — Days shy of his 86th birthday, Robert A. Caro has reached the point where his own life is a piece of history. The New-York Historical Society has established a permanent exhibit dedicated to Caro, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes and many other honors for his epic...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Brave new world: Atlanta beats LA 4-2, heads to World Series

ATLANTA (AP) — Led by an unlikely hero, the Atlanta Braves are heading back to a place that used to be so...

States mostly defer to union guidance for on-set gun safety

Safety standards developed by film studios and labor unions are the primary protection for actors and film crews...

Israel set to OK 3,000 West Bank settler homes this week

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Israel is expected to move forward with thousands of new homes for Jewish settlers in...

Olympic sprinter Alex Quiñónez fatally shot in Ecuador

GUAYAQUIL, Ecuador (AP) — Ecuadorian sprinter Alex Quiñónez was fatally shot in the port city of Guayaquil,...

Uzbek president heading toward landslide win in elections

TASHKENT, Uzbekistan (AP) — Uzbeks voted Sunday in a presidential election that the incumbent is expected to win...

Uganda's president says deadly blast likely a terrorist act

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — An explosion at an eatery in Uganda's capital was an apparent terrorist act, President...

CNN

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers need housing after damage from Superstorm Sandy, officials said Sunday.

"People are in homes that are uninhabitable. It's going to become increasingly clear that they're uninhabitable when the temperature drops and the heat doesn't come on," Sen. Andrew Cuomo told reporters. "The reality is going to be in the temperature. We're going to have tens of thousands of people that need housing solutions right away."

The governor described it as a "massive housing problem."

Between 30,000 and 40,000 people could need housing in New York City alone, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. Officials are working on coming up with a solution, he said, but they haven't yet.

"I don't know that anyone has ever taken this many people and found housing for them overnight," he said.

As if dealing with the impact of devastating storm surges, drenching rains and potent winds weren't hard enough, hundreds of thousands in New York and northern New Jersey are battling a new adversary: the cold.

For many, keeping warm isn't simply a matter of turning on the heat, after Superstorm Sandy knocked out gas lines and electricity. Statewide in New York, 730,000 people had no power for a fifth straight day Sunday, Cuomo said.

In Long Island's Nassau County, some people have died while trying to heat their homes, County Administrator Edward Mangano said Sunday.

"We've very concerned about people sheltering in place without proper heat," he said.

Some people's patience was running low, along with the temperatures.

Residents in the Rockaways, in Queens, vented their frustrations at Bloomberg as he toured the area Saturday. One woman yelled, "When are we going to get some help!" while a man talked about "old ladies in my building who have got nothing."

 

Supplementing and, in some cases, dissatisfied with the government response, neighbors and volunteers from afar to hard-hit areas over the weekend to offer food, clothing and whatever else to those who are still cold and hungry.

"We covered two children with a blanket freezing and shivering here trying to get food last night," Rockaway resident Lauren O'Connor told CNN affiliate NY1. "We said we had to do something."

Dropping temperatures are only one concern the region faces, with the presidential election only days away.

Election officials in New York City will temporarily relocate or combine some poll sites due to damage from Sandy, the Board of Elections said in a statement Sunday.

In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie has ordered early voting sites to offer extended hours through the weekend to encourage voters to make it to the polls.

For those who can't make it to their voting precincts, Christie ordered election officials to allow displaced New Jersey voters to cast their ballots electronically by submitting a mail-in ballot application via e-mail or fax. Once approved, the voter will be sent an electronic ballot that can, in turn, be e-mailed or faxed back to the county clerk.

The 900-mile-wide superstorm left a huge swath of damage when it hit the Northeast this week, claiming at least 111 lives in the United States and two in Canada after earlier killing 67 around the Caribbean.

Worst-hit New York state suffered 48 deaths, including 41 in New York City, authorities said. Twenty of those were in Staten Island.

As communities grapple with the human toll, the price of the damage is stunning: between $30 billion and $50 billion, according to disaster modeling firm Eqecat. That far exceeds the firm's pre-storm estimate of $20 billion.

Officials said Sunday that relief was in sight for residents facing fuel shortages, with Defense Department plans to deliver generators and fuel to stations that need electricity and gasoline.

 

"We think things will be getting better. We know what a disaster this is," New York Sen. Charles Schumer said Sunday. "My wife waited two and half hours for gas yesterday and called me every half hour to see what I was doing about it, so this is an answer to her as well as to every New Yorker."

Meanwhile, Bloomberg said he plans to take the subway on Monday, a sign that transit is coming back.

New York City students will also go back to school Monday, Bloomberg said. Some students will be bused to other locations if their schools have been damaged and cannot reopen, he said.

The region may be in for more bad weather, with a weaker storm predicted for next week.

"As we have this nor'easter coming next week, we have to remain extremely vigilant about our neighbors," New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said Sunday.

While many residents are seeking disaster relief help from federal and state officials, she said, some of the state's seniors may be afraid to leave their homes, even if they don't have heat. And they may not know what resources are available.

"What I'm most concerned about right now are the people we haven't met and we haven't seen," she said.

 

CNN's Sarah Hoye, Josh Levs, Mariano Castillo, Greg Botelho, Faith Karimi, David Ariosto, Erinn Cawthon, Henry Hanks and Maria White contributed to this report

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