09-21-2020  9:25 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
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NORTHWEST NEWS

US Judge Blocks Postal Service Changes That Slowed Mail

The Yakima, Washington judge called the changes “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Greater Portland, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

Latest: Report: Downed Power Lines Sparked 13 Oregon Fires

As wildfires continue to burn in Oregon and the west, here are today's updates.

NEWS BRIEFS

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

National Black Farmers' Association President Calls for Boycott of John Deere

Year after year, John Deere has declined NBFA's invitation to display its equipment at the 116,000-member organization's annual...

City of Vancouver Welcomes New Fire Chief

Brennan Blue is replacing Vancouver Fire Chief Joe Molina, who is retiring after 28 years. ...

Vandalism, no arrests, as protests continue in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Vandalism but no arrests occurred during a demonstration in downtown Portland involving about 200 people Saturday night.A march began around 9 p.m. and stopped at multiple locations. Some in the group sprayed graffiti and smashed windows at a bank, restaurant and coffee...

Wildfires and hurricanes disrupt final weeks of 2020 census

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Already burdened by the coronavirus pandemic and a tightened deadline, the Census Bureau must now contend with several natural disasters as wildfires and hurricanes disrupt the final weeks of the nation's once-a-decade headcount.The fires on the West Coast forced tens of...

AP Top 25 Reality Check: When streaks end, but not really

For the first time since the end of the 2011 season, Ohio State is not ranked in the AP Top 25.The Buckeyes' streak of 132 straight poll appearances is the second-longest active streak in the country, behind Alabama's 198.Of course, in this strange season of COVID-19, Ohio State's streak was...

Potential impact transfers this season aren't limited to QBs

While most of the offseason chatter surrounding college football transfers inevitably focuses on quarterbacks, plenty of notable players at other positions also switched teams and could make major impacts for their new schools this fall.Miami may offer the clearest example of this.Quarterback...

OPINION

Inventor Urges Congress to Pass Laws Upholding Patent Rights

German Supreme Court ruling prevents African American company Enovsys from licensing its widely used technology in Germany ...

The Extraordinary BIPOC Coalition Support Measure 110

Coming together to change the systemic racism of the failed approach to drugs and addiction ...

One Huge Lie Crystallized

The Democrats have cast the President as a failed leader, but Trump’s supporters painted him as a success and the last line of defense against radical socialism. ...

“Losers”???!!!

I am hoping that millions of us will teach Trump what it means to be a loser on November 3rd. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Chastain snags Ganassi Cup ride in busy NASCAR free agency

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Ross Chastain snagged one of the coveted open Cup seats on Monday in a promotion at Chip Ganassi Racing to drive the No. 42 next season.This year marks a particularly active free agency period with heavy turnover expected among a limited number of rides. The No. 42...

Alabama Archives faces its legacy as Confederate 'attic'

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of memorials glorifying the Confederacy had been erected by the time Marie Bankhead Owen built what may have been the grandest: The Alabama Department of Archives and History, which cataloged a version of the past that was favored by many Southern whites and...

A sweep for ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ ‘Succession’ tops Emmy Awards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Schitt's Creek,” the little Canadian show about a fish-out-of-water family, made history at Sunday's Emmy Awards with a comedy awards sweep, something even TV greats including “Frasier” and “Modern Family” failed to...

ENTERTAINMENT

Emmy winners highlight push for social justice

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Regina King and Uzo Aduba used the come-as-you-are fashion edict for Sunday's virtual Emmy Awards to highlight the national struggle for social justice.Both Black actresses wore T-shirts featuring Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old EMT from Louisville, Kentucky, who was shot...

Zendaya becomes youngest lead drama actress to win Emmy

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Zendaya said her “heart was filled” when she saw her fellow nominees, including Jennifer Aniston, cheering on the “Euphoria” actress for becoming the youngest drama lead actress to win an Emmy.The 24-year-old Zendaya became emotional after she...

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

NEW YORK (AP) — Ellen DeGeneres used her opening monologue of the new season of her daytime talk show to address allegations of a toxic work environment, apologizing for things “that never should have happened.” "I know that I’m in a position of privilege and power and I...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

NEW YORK (AP) — Ellen DeGeneres used her opening monologue of the new season of her daytime talk show to...

On 75th anniversary of UN, its chief appeals for peace

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Born out of World War II’s devastation to prevent the scourge of conflict, the...

Alabama Archives faces its legacy as Confederate 'attic'

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of memorials glorifying the Confederacy had been erected by the time Marie...

Navalny says nerve agent was found 'in and on' his body

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny demanded Monday that Russia return the clothes he...

Meghan's lawyers deny she cooperated with royal book authors

LONDON (AP) — Lawyers for a British newspaper publisher that's being sued for invasion of privacy by the...

Madrid adopts virus restrictions exposing poor-rich divide

MADRID (AP) — Heightened restrictions to stem Europe's fastest coronavirus spread in some of Madrid's...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
McMenamins
CNN

(CNN) -- The destruction caused by superstorm Sandy mounted Tuesday morning as electrical fires and record power outages added to the misery of epic flooding already plaguing the Northeast.

By early Tuesday, 7 million customers shivered in the dark in at least 10 states and the District of Columbia.
Sandy also claimed at least 16 lives across the United States, bringing the total number of deaths to at least 84 after the storm wreaked havoc in the Caribbean.
A levee break in Moonachie, New Jersey, sent authorities scrambling in boats to rescue trapped residents in several towns.

> "Within 30 minutes, those towns were under 4 or 5 feet of water," said Jeanne Baratta of Bergen County police.


She said hundreds -- possibly 1,000 -- people need to be rescued Tuesday.

"Our town's in real trouble right now," Little Ferry Police Chief Ralph Verdi said. About 75% of Little Ferry is covered in 4 to 6 feet of water, he said.

Meanwhile, the stench of smoke permeated across flooded streets as fierce winds and and rising waters shorted power lines and sparked fires in places such as Lindenhurst, New York.

At least 50 homes burned to the ground in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, fire officials said. The cause of the blaze was not immediately released. More than 200 firefighters battled the leaping flames.
Elsewhere in New York City, emergency backup power failed and 10 feet of water flooded the basement of NYU Langone Medical Center, prompting the evacuation of 260 patients. Nurses manually pumped air to the lungs of those on respirators.

Atlantic City, New Jersey, became an extension of the Atlantic Ocean. Seaweed and ocean debris swirled in the knee-deep water covering downtown streets.

Like many New Jersey residents, Montgomery Dahm stared in awe at the feet of water that deluged Atlantic City.

"I've been down here for about 16 years, and it's shocking what I'm looking at now. It's unbelievable," he said. "I mean, there's cars that are just completely underwater in some of the places I would never believe that there would be water."



And in Connecticut, the emergency management office sent out an ominous tweet to trapped residents: "If u find urself surrounded by H2O, call 4 help if u can & then get 2 highest level of home. Hang a white sheet out a street side window."

Along the East Coast, residents reported images they'd never seen before.

"We just looked out the window, and there's this river flowing through the middle of Manhattan," said Earl Bateman, a stockbroker who has lived in New York for 30 years.

More fury to come

But the weather nightmare isn't over yet.

Forecasters say the entire Northeast corridor of the United States will bear the brunt of Sandy.

Fierce winds will blow from northern Georgia into Canada and as far west as Lake Michigan on Tuesday. Meanwhile, heavy rains will soak New England and parts of the Midwest.

And a blizzard spawned by Sandy will bring 2 to 3 feet of snow to the mountains of West Virginia by Wednesday morning.

"It's three feet of heavy snow. It's like concrete," said meteorologist Reed Timmer, who is riding out the storm in Elkins, West Virginia.

Thousands of flights will remain grounded Tuesday. Federal government offices will stay closed. And it will take between 14 hours and four days to get the water out of the subway tunnels in New York.

"The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night," said Joseph Lhota, chairman of New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority. "Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on our entire transportation system, in every borough and county of the region."

The full scale of Sandy's wrath has yet to be determined. But according to a government prediction, Sandy's wind damage alone could result in more than $7 billion in economic loss.

Power outages spanned from Virginia to Maine, and the iconic Manhattan skyline turned eerily dark.

"This will be the largest storm-related outage in our history," said John Miksad, vice president of power company Con Edison.

Roaring in

After killing at least 67 people, Sandy made landfall Monday night in southern New Jersey, sending waves of water into major cities along the East Coast.

Officials blame Sandy for at least 16 deaths in the United States. Several, including an 8-year-old boy in Pennsylvania, died after being hit by a tree or tree limb. Another death was reported in Canada, where flying debris struck a woman.

Hardik Rajput of Nassau County, New York, couldn't believe the sight of waves crashing over the height of cars.

"To be honest, I was just stunned," he said. "I've never seen that. Just to see it on the street level was astounding."

In New York, Manhattan's Battery Park recorded nearly 14-foot tide, smashing a record set by 1960's Hurricane Donna by several feet.

Five hours after making landfall, Sandy still packed hurricane-force winds as it swirled about 10 miles southwest of Philadelphia.

As residents in New York and New Jersey surveyed the flooding left by Sandy, many discovered their high-rise apartment buildings are now islands.



"I am looking outside of my sixth-floor apartment, and I see that a new lake has formed in the parking lot adjacent my building," New Yorker William Yaeck said. "I would be concerned, but now my building has a view of the river."

CNN's Elizabeth Cohen, Eden Pontz, Ed Payne, Ivan Cabrera, Chandler Friedman, Amanda Watts, Ali Velshi and Henry Hanks contributed to this report.



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