10-28-2021  1:26 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

With New Affordable Housing Development, Organization for African Refugees Forced to Relocate

African Youth & Community Organization’s proposal for Montavilla headquarters rejected

Report Faults WA Sheriff Over Confrontation With Black Man

An investigation has found a sheriff in Washington state violated policies against bias-free policing and other standards during a controversial encounter with a Black newspaper carrier.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown Gets COVID-19 Vaccine Booster

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown received a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot and encouraged other eligible Oregonians to discuss booster shots with doctors.

King County's Proof of COVID Vaccine Policy Starts Monday

Beginning Monday proof of vaccination or a negative test for COVID-19 will be required to enter restaurants, bars, gyms, theaters or entertainment venues in Washington state's most populous county.

NEWS BRIEFS

WA BLM Demands Sheriff Troyer be Suspended, Added to ‘Brady List’ of Bad Cops

Charges were filed against Troyer last week for false reporting and making a false statement in January when he said newspaper...

First Residents Move in at North Seattle Health Through Housing Hotel

Repurposed hotel to house approximately 100 people experiencing chronic homelessness ...

Black Future Co-op Fund Seeks Black Washingtonians to Shape the State’s Future Through New Survey

The survey is intended to reach Black Washingtonians across income, language, age, gender, religion, and sexuality and solicit input...

De La Salle Opens New NE Campus

Five years in the making, the new De La Salle North Catholic High School campus is located at 4300 NE Killingsworth St. ...

Ex-NYT Columnist Kristof Announces Run for Oregon Governor

Former New York Times reporter and columnist Nicholas Kristof announced Wednesday he is running for governor of Oregon ...

Challenge to residency requirements for assisted-suicide law

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A lawsuit has been filed saying the residency requirements for Oregon’s assisted suicide law violate the U.S. Constitution. Oregon was the first state to legalize medical aid in dying in 1997, when it allowed adult residents with a terminal diagnosis...

Senators urge emergency protections for wolves in US West

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A group of Democratic lawmakers on Thursday urged the Biden administration to enact emergency protections for gray wolves in the U.S. West in response to Republican-backed state laws that make it easier to kill the predators. Twenty-one U.S. senators led...

Vanderbilt's next chance to end SEC skid comes vs Missouri

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The last Southeastern Conference team Vanderbilt beat is coming to Nashville Saturday and the Commodores are looking to end their 17-game skid against league opponents. Not that Vanderbilt coach Clark Lea is looking at the Missouri Tigers just an...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

OPINION

Letter to the Editor: About the UN Climate Change Conference

Global leaders have failed to take the action necessary to avert climate disaster and Oregon leadership is scant better. ...

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Schools debate: Gifted and talented, or racist and elitist?

NEW YORK (AP) — Communities across the United States are reconsidering their approach to gifted and talented programs in schools as vocal parents blame such elite programs for worsening racial segregation and inequities in the country’s education system. A plan announced by...

2 neo-Nazi group members sentenced to 9 years in prison

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — Two neo-Nazi group members were sentenced on Thursday to nine years in prison each in a case that highlighted a broader federal crackdown on far-right extremists. FBI agents arrested former Canadian Armed Forces reservist Patrik Jordan Mathews, U.S. Army...

Review: Black, white and shades of gray in superb 'Passing'

Rarely have the hues of black and white, cinematographically speaking, looked so beautifully lush as in “Passing,” the hugely impressive directorial debut of actor Rebecca Hall. But at its core, this film is about shades of gray. Which is to say,...

ENTERTAINMENT

William Jackson Harper's 'Love Life' drives show's season 2

NEW YORK (AP) — His new project may be as the lead in HBO Max's “ Love Life,” but William Jackson Harper will be the first to tell you he doesn't usually seek out relationship stories. “Rom-coms are not the thing that I gravitate to,” said the actor. “I like a lot of...

In 'The Souvenir Part II,' a human-scaled epic concludes

NEW YORK (AP) — Joanna Hogg first had the instinct to make a film about her then-unfolding relationship to her heroin-addicted first love — a traumatic and formative time that coincided with her coming-of-age as a filmmaker — in 1979. Back then, she didn’t feel capable...

Gordon Ramsay's social media project culminates in cookbook

NEW YORK (AP) — How did Gordon Ramsay spend his pandemic lockdown? Getting frenetic in a kitchen, of course. The chef with a dizzying number of books, restaurants and TV shows was home in Cornwall, England, with mouths to feed last year when he did a series of lives on...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Oil giants deny spreading disinformation on climate change

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top executives of ExxonMobil and other oil giants denied spreading disinformation about...

Legal experts see strong self-defense claim for Rittenhouse

When Kyle Rittenhouse goes on trial Monday for shooting three men during street protests in Wisconsin that...

How it happened: Inside movie set where Baldwin's gun fired

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Light from a high afternoon sun slanted through the tall windows of the weathered wooden...

Bulgarian restaurant workers protest new COVID-19 pass rule

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — Thousands of restaurant owners, chefs, waiters and bartenders took to the streets...

France fines British boats as fishing dispute escalates

LONDON (AP) — Britain said Thursday it would summon the French ambassador for a dressing-down, the latest move...

Vatican cancels live TV broadcast of Biden greeting pope

ROME (AP) — The Vatican on Thursday abruptly canceled the planned live broadcast of U.S. President Joe Biden...

Mariano Castillo CNN

(CNN) -- As word spread this week that some benefits of the nation's health care law will not extend to the thousands of undocumented immigrants given reprieve from deportation by the Obama administration, advocacy groups were reminded that the youths' status remains much in limbo.

The Obama administration earned the praise of immigrant advocacy groups when it decided to grant relief to young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children. But a new rule would keep those same immigrants from federal health insurance coverage, putting some in an uncomfortable spot where they have permission to be here, but can't take advantage of all the programs available for others.

Some who championed the new immigration policy expressed disappointment at the news, which was more in line with critics of the policy who say that this group should receive no benefits whatsoever because of their legal status.

As many as 1.7 million immigrant youths may meet the criteria to be spared from deportation for a renewable two-year period, according to an estimate from the Pew Hispanic Center.

The New York Times was the first to report about a little-noticed rule put in place by the Department of Health and Human Services, that excludes the beneficiaries of "deferred status" from the health insurance benefits.

The Obama administration was clear that those who qualified for deferred action did not gain legal status in the United States, but would have "lawful presence," which would allow them to work legally and opened the door for other benefits, like driver's licenses.

But the HHS directive, published in the Federal Register, specifically excludes this group from the "lawful presence" category.

The department determined that those with deferred status are not eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

The HHS also stated that those with deferred status would not be eligible for health insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

The directive is effective immediately, before any deferred action recipients may apply for a temporary health insurance program for those with pre-existing conditions.

"It's disappointing that these youths won't be able to take advantage of the resources available to the rest of us under the Affordable Care Act," said Liliana Ranon, director of policy and legislation at the League of United Latin American Citizens.

Those who need, but cannot receive, subsidies to purchase health insurance, are likely to turn to the more expensive option of going to the emergency room for health care, she said.

Because deferred status grants the undocumented immigrants the ability to work, they would be eligible for insurance through their employers. But, Ranon says, not all jobs provide this benefit.

Still, she is supportive of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, as the policy is known. Those who qualify remain in limbo, but they are in a better spot than they were in before, she said.

"We need to continue putting pressure on the administration and Congress to ensure they don't stay in limbo status," she said.

The White House said that DACA is just a stopgap measure for those in the country illegally who were brought as children and pose no danger to national security or the public.

"It was never intended that those with deferred action under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals process would receive federal financial assistance for health care," Assistant Press Secretary Nick Papas said.

Congress still must act to find a permanent solution to the issue of illegal immigration, he said.

There will be a cost to excluding deferred status immigrants from health benefits, said Adolph Falcon, senior vice president of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health.

"The whole purpose was to allow these youths to be a part of American life and convert that promise into economic contributors to society. An important part of that is a healthy workforce," he said.

By not providing all resources to help this group get health insurance as youths, it creates unnecessary health risks for their future, he said.

"It's unfortunate because this is a group that is not expensive to cover at all," he said.

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