10-06-2022  7:39 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Vancouver City Council Bans Large Fossil Fuel Facilities

While new facilities that distribute, extract, refine or process fossil fuels have been temporarily prohibited by the Vancouver City Council since 2020, the council this week unanimously made the ban permanent

Community Group Meets to Discuss Vision for Albina Arts Center

Oregon Community Foundation is in the process of figuring out how to gift the building back to a Black-led non-profit that is willing to center arts, healing and intergenerational community-building within the space, in perpetuity.

E. Washington Rancher Sentenced for 'Ghost Cattle' Fraud

Cody Easterday was sentenced Tuesday afternoon in federal court in Yakima, Washington, for what U.S. District Court Judge Stanley Bastian called “the biggest theft or fraud I’ve seen in my career."

$40K Awarded to Woman Injured by Portland Police at Protests

Erin Wenzel sued the city for assault, battery and negligence, claiming that on Aug. 14, 2020, an officer “ran at her and violently slammed into her with a nightstick” while she was leaving the area as police had instructed. 

NEWS BRIEFS

Transgender Woman Assaulted, Cops Seek Help Finding Suspects

A transgender woman was assaulted on Monday in Eugene, Oregon, by a man and three others who allegedly used transgender slurs ...

Rosa Floyd Honored as 2023 Oregon Teacher of the Year

Nellie Muir Elementary IB School educator surprised with state honor ...

Amazon to Invest $150 Million in Funds That Provide Underrepresented Entrepreneurs With Access to Capital

Amazon today announced Amazon Catalytic Capital, a new initiative to invest 0 million in venture capital funds, accelerators, and...

Bonamici to Host Webinar on Student Loan Forgiveness Plan

On Thursday, Oct. 6 Congress member Suzanne Bonamici will host a webinar on the Biden-Harris Administration’s transformational...

SUNDAY: “No More Gun Violence” Block Party in North Portland

Event marks final in summer series aimed at bringing people together to reclaim their neighborhoods and fight for a future free of gun...

Fish and Wildlife shoots wrong wolf, more attacks confirmed

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Wolves from two packs in northeast Washington state have attacked more cattle, prompting the Department of Fish and Wildlife to consider whether to again try culling the Smackout pack after a botched attempt last month. Fish and Wildlife officials confirmed...

Nike co-founder now backs Republican in Oregon governor race

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Nike co-founder Phil Knight has donated jumi million to Republican gubernatorial candidate Christine Drazan’s campaign, seemingly changing course after giving .75 million to a candidate unaffiliated with a major political party. The latest donation makes it...

No. 2 Georgia looking for return to top form against Auburn

ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Don't expect Auburn players to empathize with concerns expressed this week about No. 2 Georgia's sudden dip from championship form. The Bulldogs, who play Auburn on Saturday, fell from the top spot in The Associated Press Top 25 this week after having to rally for...

No. 2 Georgia looking for 6th straight win over rival Auburn

Auburn (3-2, 1-1 SEC) at No. 2 Georgia (5-0, 2-0), Saturday, 3:30 p.m. ET (CBS) Line: Georgia by 29 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Georgia leads 62-56. WHAT’S AT STAKE? Georgia will try to regain its momentum after...

OPINION

Democracy, Disasters, and the Black Vote

The Black vote has an opportunity to determine the outcome of the November 8 general election. Let's not be the only people who don’t realize our strength. ...

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia apologizes for experiments on Black inmates

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The city of Philadelphia issued an apology Thursday for the unethical medical experiments performed on mostly Black inmates at its Holmesburg Prison from the 1950s through the 1970s. The move comes after community activists and families of some of those inmates...

Biden pardons thousands for 'simple possession' of marijuana

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is pardoning thousands of Americans convicted of “simple possession” of marijuana under federal law, as his administration takes a dramatic step toward decriminalizing the drug and addressing charging practices that disproportionately impact people of...

Federal judge halts key parts of New York's new gun law

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York's latest attempt to restrict who can carry a handgun in public and where firearms can be brought was picked apart Thursday by a federal judge, who ruled that multiple provisions in a state law passed this year are unconstitutional. In a ruling that...

ENTERTAINMENT

Hilary Swank talks filming new series while expecting twins

Hilary Swank has announced she's pregnant with twins and says that revelation might explain some of her actions on set of her new ABC series “ Alaska Daily.” “You don’t tell for 12 weeks for a certain reason. But then, like, you’re growing and you’re using the bathroom a...

Jada Pinkett Smith has deal for 'no holds barred' memoir

NEW YORK (AP) — Jada Pinkett Smith has a lifetime of thoughts she'd like to set down. The actor, singer, entrepreneur and co-host of the Facebook Watch show “Red Table Talk” has a deal for what Dey Street Books is calling an “honest and gripping memoir” that will cover her...

Silent films to live on in movie theater lobby card project

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — “Missing Millions" is a 1922 silent film with a darkly prescient title — like the vast majority from that era, the movie all but vanished in the ensuing century, survived mostly by lobby cards. The cards, scarcely bigger than letter paper, promoted the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Immigration will vex Biden no matter who controls Congress

WASHINGTON (AP) — At a recent White House ceremony honoring Hispanic heritage in the U.S., President Joe Biden...

EXPLAINER: Russia's military woes mount amid Ukraine attacks

Even as the Kremlin moved to absorb parts of Ukraine in a sharp escalation of the conflict, the Russian military...

Whistleblower: 665 left FBI over misconduct in two decades

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. senator is pressing the FBI for more information after a whistleblower alleged that an...

Survivors tell grim tale of southern Greek migrant shipwreck

KYTHIRA, Greece (AP) — Many had embarked on the stomach-churning sea journey before; many will follow. ...

Argentine judge launches probe into Nicaragua abuse claims

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — A judge in Argentina has launched a criminal investigation into Nicaragua’s...

Iran airs video with 2 French citizens it claims were spying

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Iran on Thursday published video showing two detained French citizens...

Josh Levs and Chelsea J. Carter CNN

(CNN) -- Isaac slashed its way further inland Thursday, claiming its first fatality and stranding residents in flood-prone areas even as it threatened to wreak more havoc in the days to come.

Mississippi and Louisiana announced mandatory evacuations for all low-lying areas along the Tangiaphoa River.

A dam at 700-acre Lake Tangipahoa has not breached, "but has been badly damaged by heavy rains," the Pike County Emergency Management Agency said.



Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced that Mississippi officials planned an intentional breach at the dam to help prevent it from breaking.

The river was observed at more than 17 feet Thurday morning -- more than two feet above flood stage, the National Weather Service said, predicting that the river will go as high as 19.5 feet by Friday.

Near Kentwood, Louisiana, the river was at 12 feet Thursday morning and could go as high as 17 feet -- four feet above flood level in the area, the weather service said.

Officials predict that a planned breach would send much of the water into a heavily forested area and not flood Louisiana towns, Jindal said.

However, Tangipahoa Parish President Gordon Burgess called for a mandatory evacuation in the area. Jindal said the move was a precaution because if the dam were to break it would only take 90 minutes for flood waters to get to Kentwood.

The parish said the evacuation could involve 40,000 to 60,000 people, but those are "very rough estimates," Jindal said.

Kentwood's population is just over 2,000.

On the Mississippi side, 12 homes were evacuated, emergency management officials said.

Although Isaac weakened Thursday, the hurricane-turned-tropical-storm was still dumping heavy rains, creating dangers along the northern Gulf Coast.

The storm has had a "major impact" on Mississippi, Gov. Phil Bryant told CNN in Gulfport. "This is a man-made beach," he said, indicating the area where he was standing. "Most of that sand is gone. Thousands of homes have been damaged; people have been out of their homes and will be."

A tow truck driver attempting to clear debris on a road in Mississippi was struck by a falling tree, officials said. The incident took place at midnight, said Amanda Harris, deputy director of the Pearl River County Emergency Management office. The National Weather Service said it received reports of the fatality in Picayune, Mississippi.

On Louisiana's border with Mississippi, residents of Washington Parish were alerted that the Bogue Chitto River was expected to rise by 14 feet overnight.

To the southwest, in St. John the Baptist Parish, National Guard troops looked for people stranded after thousands were forced to flee when a surge forced water over the banks of Lake Pontchartrain.

"What we're doing is we have got law enforcement and fire personnel who are going door to door to notify people," Tommy Thiebaud, the Washington Parish director of emergency services, told CNN.

Some areas could see 25 inches of rain, the National Weather Service said.

Isaac's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 40 mph as of 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET) and it was moving north-northwest at 9 mph, the service said.

"On the forecast track, the center of Isaac will continue to move over Louisiana today, over Arkansas on Friday, and over southern Missouri Friday night," forecasters said.

In Plaquemines Parish, southeast of New Orleans, 3,000 people remained in an area close to an 8-foot-tall levee that was threatened by rising waters, Jindal's office said.

About 100 people who had ignored an evacuation order were rescued Wednesday in a flooded part of the parish, officials said. On Thursday, authorities from the sheriff's office and National Guard "will begin looking house to house to make sure they got everyone," Parish President Billy Nungesser said.

"We didn't have time to panic," Rafael Delgadillo of Braithwaite, Louisiana, told CNN on Thursday. He, his wife and daughter were rescued by a neighbor Wednesday. "We were in survivor mode," he said.

Nearly a million customers had no electricity across Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi. Utility companies reported more than 978,000 customers without power.

Water boiling advisories were being issued in a number of towns and cities along the Gulf Coast.

A flash flood emergency was issued for Slidell, Louisiana. Surge flooding from Bayou Bonfouca and the W-14 canal gushed into parts of the city, and sudden inundation of up to 5 feet was possible in low-lying areas, the National Weather Service said.

Evacuations were under way in the city Thursday morning.

Authorities expected some street flooding in a few subdivisions on the south side of town, "but at present, that street flooding is minimal," the city said in a statement Thursday morning.

"There is water all around me," Vincent Molino, who lives in the area, told CNN in an iReport. "It looks like my home is in a lake. The area is completely flooded ... pretty much the whole neighborhood has three to five feet of water. We saw a big military vehicle stop by to ask us if we are OK.

"It is strange that the water is going down really slowly.

"The most amazing thing is that I still have power," Molino said.

Mississippi had 70 rescues along the Gulf Coast overnight, Gov. Bryant said.

Throughout parts of the Gulf Coast, the National Weather Service warned, "life-threatening hazards from storm surge and inland flooding are still occurring."

Isaac is believed to have spawned three tornadoes overnight in Mississippi and Alabama, the weather service said.

Tornadoes are suspected to be behind damage in Gulfport and Jackson, Mississippi, while a twister is blamed for knocking down power lines and damaging a home in Geneva, Alabama.

President Barack Obama signed major disaster declarations for Louisiana and Mississippi after slow-moving Isaac pummeled the Gulf Coast, dropping more than 20 inches of rain in some locations and creating a dangerous storm surge.

Isaac made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane seven years after Hurricane Katrina swept ashore in Louisiana and Mississippi. Katrina is blamed for the deaths of 1,800 people, most in New Orleans after the levee system failed and the city flooded.

Isaac's greatest punch bypassed New Orleans.

The city reported relatively minor damage from the storm, and officials said there were at least a dozen incidents of looting. New Orleans Police said arrests were made in each case, but didn't specify how many people were involved or where the arrests occurred.

"Our crews have already hit the streets this morning to assess damage and start clean-up," New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu tweeted.

Still, New Orleans was expected to face some pounding rain throughout Thursday.

"This storm took forever to get here, and now it doesn't want to leave," said Lt. Col. Jerry Sneed, deputy mayor in charge of public safety.

National Guard troops and authorities searched St. John the Baptist Parish for people trapped by up to 6 feet of water.

By late Wednesday, about 1,500 people had been evacuated from the parish, and another 1,500 were expected to leave their homes, Jindal's office said.

Dozens of buses moved residents out of flooded portions of the parish, while authorities worked to rescue others.

"We're continuing to rescue people from different areas throughout the parish," Paige Falgoust, communications director for St. John the Baptist Parish, said early Thursday. "Our main focus right now is getting people out of their homes."

The storm surge from Lake Pontchartrain came quickly and "in a different way from what we were expecting," Falgoust said.

The surge was unusually bad in LaPlace, about 25 miles northwest of New Orleans, where many people had been rescued or still needed to escape rapidly rising water.

By Thursday morning, at least 200 rescues had taken place, parish officials said.

Dusk-to-dawn curfews were in effect from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, where authorities were urging residents to stay inside and ride out the slow-moving storm.

In Plaquemines Parish, an initial estimate showed that as many as 800 homes may have received significant water damage, Jindal said.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reported a significant storm surge in the parish, which was the scene of many rescues. One involved National Guard troops who moved 112 residents from the Riverbend nursing home to another facility.

Officials were considering intentionally breaching the levee downstream to allow some of the floodwater to flow back out of the inundated area, Jindal said.

That could happen Saturday, said Nungesser, the parish president. The Times-Picayune reported that digging could begin as early as Thursday.

Airports from Baton Rogue to Biloxi were closed until at least Thursday as the stubborn storm continued to saturate the region.

CNN's Leslie Tripp, Brian Todd, Soledad O'Brien, Ed Lavandera, Martin Savidge, John Zarrella, Chandler Friedman, Anika Chin, Mike Ahlers, Aaron Cooper and Ed Payne contributed to this report.

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events