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NORTHWEST NEWS

Abortion Remains Legal, Accessible in Oregon in Wake of Supreme Court Ruling

Decision has no effect on Oregon’s Reproductive Health Equity Act that guarantees right to receive abortion, health care providers’ right to provide it

Black Man Police Killed in Clackamas County ID'd, Police Say He Had Gun

The shooting is being investigated by the Oregon City and Lake Oswego police departments.

WA, OR Leaders Skeptical About Pausing Gas Taxes

President Joe Biden on Wednesday urged Congress to suspend federal gasoline and diesel taxes for three months and urged states to do the same at the local level.

Mother-Daughter Mental Health Professionals Launch Organization for Black Professional Women

Mo Better Wellness, Connection, and Facilitation will offer wellness events and consulting.

NEWS BRIEFS

Increased Emergency Snap Benefits Continue in July

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Opacity of Performance: Takahiro Yamamoto Opens at PAM

The Portland Art Museum marks a return to live art inside its galleries with a dance installation by Takahiro Yamamoto, the museum’s...

Portland's First Black Book Festival Launches on Juneteenth Weekend

She’s bringing together the community through books! ...

Juneteenth Events

Juneteenth Oregon Celebration was founded 50 years ago by the late and beloved community leader Clara Peoples. View Juneteenth events...

Portland Public Schools Expands Weapons Ban

The action follows a bill the Oregon Legislature passed earlier this year giving schools the ability to prohibit concealed carry...

10 arrested in Eugene protest over abortion ruling

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Police in Eugene say 10 people were arrested during a Friday night protest following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn the landmark abortion rights case Roe v. Wade. The arrests were mostly for disorderly conduct, Portland television station KOIN...

Inslee seeks abortion rights amendment to state constitution

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said he will push for a state constitutional amendment to protect abortion rights within his state's borders, as well as laws that will make it difficult for other states to investigate whether their own residents have visited Washington for...

OPINION

Quenn Tiye’s Kitchen

Centuries of indoctrination have ingrained into the minds of white and Black Americans that any aspect of Africanness is negative. ...

The Plan for Transforming Public Safety and Policing in the U.S.

Rising crime leaves communities feeling unsafe, however, police violence and killings of unarmed civilians demonstrate that pouring more money into more-of-the-same policing is not the answer. ...

What Is Afrofuturism? An English Professor Explains

Chambliss defines Afrofuturism as an intersection of speculation and liberation that’s inspired by the concerns of people of African descent. ...

Reflections on the Massacre of the Buffalo 10 & Racism

Former NY state senator and Buffalo native knew many of the people killed ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

LAPD officer who died was beaten in training, mother claims

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Los Angeles police officer who died of neck injuries suffered during training had been beaten by fellow officers in an exercise meant to “simulate a mob,” according to a wrongful-death claim filed against the city by his mother. Houston Tipping, 32, was hurt...

Religious schools may face another hurdle to state tuition

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Religious schools got what they wanted when the Supreme Court allowed them to participate in a state tuition program. But the state attorney general said the ruling will be for naught unless the schools are willing to abide by the same antidiscrimination law as...

To some defenders, gun ruling could right a racial wrong

NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. Supreme Court struck down New York's tight restrictions on who can carry a handgun, condemnation erupted from liberal leaders and activists. But some public defenders, often allies of progressive activists, praised the court's ruling, saying...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: Austin Butler, Baz Luhrmann deliver a grand ‘Elvis’

The brief life of Elvis Presley is not something that fits neatly into a conventional biopic formula, though many have tried. It was, perhaps, always going to take a director as wild and visionary as Baz Luhrmann to do something that evokes the essence of the King’s 42 years. Luhrmann knows...

John Williams, 90, steps away from film, but not music

NEW YORK (AP) — After more than six decades of making bicycles soar, sending panicked swimmers to the shore and other spellbinding close encounters, John Williams is putting the final notes on what may be his last film score. “At the moment I’m working on ‘Indiana Jones 5,’...

Director James Burrows looks back on his career in new book

NEW YORK (AP) — James Burrows loves sitcoms, and he should. The 81-year-old has directed more than 1,000 episodes of TV sitcoms, including fan favorites such as “Friends,” “Cheers,” and Will & Grace." He's also directed the pilot episodes for “Frasier,” “Two and a Half Men,”...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

To some defenders, gun ruling could right a racial wrong

NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. Supreme Court struck down New York's tight restrictions on who can carry a...

Russia fires missiles across Ukraine, cements gains in east

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Pfizer says tweaked COVID-19 shots boost omicron protection

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Turkish president: Sweden hasn't alleviated NATO concerns

ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has told Sweden's prime minister that he has not seen any...

Gabon and Togo admitted into Commonwealth group of nations

KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — The African nations of Gabon and Togo have been admitted into the Commonwealth group of...

Groups in Spain and Morocco push for border deaths inquiry

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Paul Kiel and Cora Currier, Propublica

May 24, 2012: This post has been updated to clarify Virginia's use of its settlement funds.

States have diverted $974 million from this year's landmark mortgage settlement to pay down budget deficits or fund programs unrelated to the foreclosure crisis, according to a ProPublica analysis. That's nearly 40 percent of the $2.5 billion in penalties paid to the states under the agreement.

The settlement, between five of the country's biggest banks and an alliance of almost all states and the federal government, resolved allegations that the banks deceived homeowners and broke laws when pursuing foreclosure. One part of the settlement is the cash coming to states; the deal urged states to use that money on programs related to the crisis, but it didn't require them to.

ProPublica contacted every state that participated in the agreement (and the District of Columbia) to obtain the most comprehensive breakdown yet of how they'll be spending the funds. You can see the detailed state-by-state results here, along with an interactive map. Many states told us they'll be finalizing their plans in the coming weeks. We'll be updating our breakdown as the results come in.

What stands out is that even states slammed by the foreclosure crisis are diverting much or all of their money to the general fund. In California, among the hardest hit states, the governor has proposed using all the money to plug his state's huge budget gap. And Arizona, also among the worst hit, has diverted about half of its funds to general use. Four other states where a high rate of homeowners faced foreclosure during the crisis are spending little if any of their settlement funds on homeowner services: Georgia, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Maine.

Overall, only about $527 million has been earmarked for new homeowner-focused programs, but that number will go up. A number of large states — in particular New York, Nevada, Illinois, and Florida — have indicated they'll be dedicating substantial amounts of the funds to consumer programs, but haven't yet produced a final breakdown.

Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, who led the coalition of attorneys general who negotiated the deal, argued that only a very small portion of the settlement was being diverted and it will "overwhelmingly" benefit homeowners. The centerpiece of the settlement is a requirement that the banks earn $20 billion in "credits" by helping homeowners in various ways — from reducing principal on underwater homes to bulldozing empty ones. Because the system awards only partial credit for certain actions, Miller said the settlement would bring more than $20 billion in benefits to consumers — he estimated $35 billion. Critics contend those sorts of numbers far overstate the benefits to consumers, because the banks can claim credit for some activities that were already routine.

The banks will only pay $5 billion in actual cash penalties under the agreement. The largest chunk, $2.5 billion, goes to the states' attorneys general, while about $1 billion goes to the federal government. $1.5 billion will be sent to borrowers who lost their homes to foreclosure during the crisis in the form of $2,000 payments.

Compared with the billions going to consumers, Miller contended, $1 billion going to states' general funds was minimal. It was always expected that the states would divert some of the money to their general expenditures, he said.

But when announcing the deal, state and federal officials said the states' $2.5 billion would mainly fund housing counselors and legal aid organizations. Studies have shown homeowners stand a better chance of avoiding foreclosure if they get the help of a counselor, and homeowners lack legal representation in the overwhelming majority of foreclosure cases. The money was divvied up among the states according to a formula that took into account how large the states were and how hard they were hit by the crisis.

As you can see from our breakdown, 15 states have so far allocated over half their amounts to consumer-focused efforts. But the uses range widely. In Ohio, $75 million has been set aside to destroy some 100,000 abandoned homes. In Minnesota, the state is setting up a fund to compensate victims of the banks' foreclosure abuses.

In two of the states most affected by the foreclosure crisis, California and Arizona, the attorneys general had intended to use most of their funds on homeowner-related efforts before the governors intervened.

After California Attorney General Kamala Harris prepared a proposal to spend the money on counselors, lawyers, and other consumer-related efforts, Gov. Jerry Brown released a proposed revised budget last week that used the state's $411 million for existing housing programs. In other words, the money would just be used to help fill the state's $16 billion budget deficit. Harris opposes the move, which still must make its way through the state legislature for it to become law.

The $25 billion settlement: Breaking it down

$20 billion in credits:

·  $10 billion for cutting debt for struggling, underwater homeowners

·  $7 billion for various other forms of homeowner relief

·  $3 billion for refinancings for underwater homeowners

$5 billion in cash payments:

·  $2.5 billion to the states' attorneys general

·  $1.5 billion to borrowers who lost homes to foreclosure

·  $912 million to the federal government

·  $90 million to various state organizations

In Arizona, the attorney general had similar plans. Then state lawmakers and the governor took $50 million of the $98 million coming the state's way. Although the budget legislation stated that the money should be used to fund departments related to housing and law enforcement, there will be no new spending. Housing advocates are readying a lawsuit to stop the transfer and expect to file in the coming month, said Valerie Iverson, Executive Director of Arizona Housing Alliance.

Several other large states have diverted most or all of the money:

• Georgia directed all of its $99 million to programs designed to attract new businesses. A spokesman for the governor said, "He believes that the best way to prevent foreclosures amongst honest homeowners who have experienced hard times is to create jobs here in our state."

• In Missouri, the state legislature used almost all of its $39 million to fund higher education, which had been slated for cuts. The attorney general's office kept $1 million for hotlines and outreach related to the settlement.

• Virginia put the entirety of its $66.5 million into the state's general fund without restrictions. In March, Democrats proposed a budget amendment that would funnel all of the money to foreclosure prevention and homeownership programs, but it was voted down. $7 million wasultimately allocated to a state fund for housing programs. While the appropriation was not explicitly tied to the settlement in the final budget, lawmakers involved in the negotiation said that the funding was as a result of the settlement.

• Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker announced soon after the settlement was finalized that the bulk of it—roughly $26 million—would go into the state general fund. Two million went to an economic development fund, including funds for demolition in blighted neighborhoods. Many state Democrats and housing advocates opposed the plan, but failed to block it.

• Texas directed its $135 million to the state's general fund, of which $10 million has been allocated for basic services to low-income Texans. The legislature won't formally decide what to do with the rest until next January because it meets only once every two years. John Henneberger, co-director of Texas Housers, an affordable housing group, said that in speaking to legislators, advocates had "received no assurances that this money will be used according to the purposes of the settlement."

ProPublica will continue to track how the funds are being used in the coming months. Check out our breakdown and interactive map for updates.

Jan. 6 Committe Hearings - Day 5

The next hearing will be held sometime in July; an exact date has not yet been announced.

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