10-28-2021  2:26 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

With New Affordable Housing Development, Organization for African Refugees Forced to Relocate

African Youth & Community Organization’s proposal for Montavilla headquarters rejected

Report Faults WA Sheriff Over Confrontation With Black Man

An investigation has found a sheriff in Washington state violated policies against bias-free policing and other standards during a controversial encounter with a Black newspaper carrier.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown Gets COVID-19 Vaccine Booster

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown received a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot and encouraged other eligible Oregonians to discuss booster shots with doctors.

King County's Proof of COVID Vaccine Policy Starts Monday

Beginning Monday proof of vaccination or a negative test for COVID-19 will be required to enter restaurants, bars, gyms, theaters or entertainment venues in Washington state's most populous county.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition (PIRC) Re-Launches Emergency Assistance Hotline

Community members can call the hotline if they or a family member has been detained by immigration authorities or if they witness a...

WA BLM Demands Sheriff Troyer be Suspended, Added to ‘Brady List’ of Bad Cops

Charges were filed against Troyer last week for false reporting and making a false statement in January when he said newspaper...

First Residents Move in at North Seattle Health Through Housing Hotel

Repurposed hotel to house approximately 100 people experiencing chronic homelessness ...

Black Future Co-op Fund Seeks Black Washingtonians to Shape the State’s Future Through New Survey

The survey is intended to reach Black Washingtonians across income, language, age, gender, religion, and sexuality and solicit input...

De La Salle Opens New NE Campus

Five years in the making, the new De La Salle North Catholic High School campus is located at 4300 NE Killingsworth St. ...

Senators urge emergency protections for wolves in US West

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A group of Democratic lawmakers on Thursday urged the Biden administration to enact emergency protections for gray wolves in the U.S. West in response to Republican-backed state laws that make it easier to kill the predators. Twenty-one U.S. senators led...

Challenge to residency requirements for assisted-suicide law

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A lawsuit has been filed saying the residency requirements for Oregon’s assisted suicide law violate the U.S. Constitution. Oregon was the first state to legalize medical aid in dying in 1997, when it allowed adult residents with a terminal diagnosis...

Vanderbilt's next chance to end SEC skid comes vs Missouri

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The last Southeastern Conference team Vanderbilt beat is coming to Nashville Saturday and the Commodores are looking to end their 17-game skid against league opponents. Not that Vanderbilt coach Clark Lea is looking at the Missouri Tigers just an...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

OPINION

Letter to the Editor: About the UN Climate Change Conference

Global leaders have failed to take the action necessary to avert climate disaster and Oregon leadership is scant better. ...

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

County botches Spanish-language ballot instructions

Some Spanish-speaking voters in a Pennsylvania city where Hispanics account for nearly 70% of the population are at risk of being disenfranchised in next week’s general election because of an error in Spanish-language instructions that accompanied 17,000 mail-in ballots, activists and elected...

Schools debate: Gifted and talented, or racist and elitist?

NEW YORK (AP) — Communities across the United States are reconsidering their approach to gifted and talented programs in schools as vocal parents blame such elite programs for worsening racial segregation and inequities in the country’s education system. A plan announced by...

2 neo-Nazi group members sentenced to 9 years in prison

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — Two neo-Nazi group members were sentenced on Thursday to nine years in prison each in a case that highlighted a broader federal crackdown on far-right extremists. FBI agents arrested former Canadian Armed Forces reservist Patrik Jordan Mathews, U.S. Army...

ENTERTAINMENT

William Jackson Harper's 'Love Life' drives show's season 2

NEW YORK (AP) — His new project may be as the lead in HBO Max's “ Love Life,” but William Jackson Harper will be the first to tell you he doesn't usually seek out relationship stories. “Rom-coms are not the thing that I gravitate to,” said the actor. “I like a lot of...

Review: Plush are the future of rock on debut album

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Gordon Ramsay's social media project culminates in cookbook

NEW YORK (AP) — How did Gordon Ramsay spend his pandemic lockdown? Getting frenetic in a kitchen, of course. The chef with a dizzying number of books, restaurants and TV shows was home in Cornwall, England, with mouths to feed last year when he did a series of lives on...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Legal experts see strong self-defense claim for Rittenhouse

When Kyle Rittenhouse goes on trial Monday for shooting three men during street protests in Wisconsin that...

AP PHOTOS: Summer days at the beach, in Israel and Gaza

Though the beaches in Tel Aviv and Gaza City look out on the same cresting waves of the Mediterranean Sea, they...

How it happened: Inside movie set where Baldwin's gun fired

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Bulgarian restaurant workers protest new COVID-19 pass rule

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — Thousands of restaurant owners, chefs, waiters and bartenders took to the streets...

France fines British boats as fishing dispute escalates

LONDON (AP) — Britain said Thursday it would summon the French ambassador for a dressing-down, the latest move...

Vatican cancels live TV broadcast of Biden greeting pope

ROME (AP) — The Vatican on Thursday abruptly canceled the planned live broadcast of U.S. President Joe Biden...

Sam Hananel and Scott Bauer the Associated Press


Wisconsin's Scott Walker faces a recall primary
May 8

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Unions are facing a make-or-break moment in their campaign to drive Wisconsin's Republican governor from office.

If unions and their Democratic allies prevail in the recall - just over a year after Gov. Scott Walker signed legislation to curb collective bargaining rights for most public workers - it would send a powerful warning to other politicians who might try to limit union rights. Unions also might find it easier to turn out more voters in November for President Barack Obama in this battleground state.

A Walker victory would be a stunning setback for organized labor.

"If we lose, it's a shot in the mouth," said Greg Junemann, president of the Professional and Technical Engineers union and a Milwaukee resident. "We can survive it, but we'll be reeling."

Unions have experienced mixed results over the past year in trying to beat back efforts in dozens of states to restrict bargaining rights, pass right-to-work laws or limit how unions collect dues.

They enjoyed a major victory in November when Ohio voters in a statewide referendum repealed a law limiting collective bargaining rights for the state's public employees. But they fell short in an earlier recall campaign to wrest control of the Wisconsin Senate from Republicans and suffered a major defeat when Indiana this year became the first state in more than a decade to pass right-to-work legislation.

Recalling a sitting governor would be a major feat, something that's happened only twice before in U.S. history.

"After devoting so much effort, energy and funds to the recall, unions have to show positive results or it will be judged to be a sign of a weakened labor movement," said Gary Chaison, professor of industrial relations at Clark University in Worcester, Mass. "If they can't win in one of the most liberal states, where can they win?"

The recall primary in Wisconsin is May 8, and the general election is June 5.

Such massive, costly campaigns have taken a toll on unions, diverting resources they could have spent helping political allies or organizing new members. Unions spent nearly $30 million turning out votes to repeal the Ohio measure and more than $12 million on the Wisconsin state Senate recall effort.

"Unions are not bottomless wells when it comes to resources for this stuff," said former AFL-CIO political director Steve Rosenthal. "As we're forced to wage these fights to defend what we've got, it's a win-win for the other side because they force us to spend a lot of money to plug holes in the dike."

Unions and others had little trouble gathering more than 900,000 signatures to authorize a recall election for Wisconsin's governor. Finding a suitably pro-union candidate to take on Walker has not so easy. Most unions have lined up behind former Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk, who has pledged to veto any state budget that doesn't reinstate collective bargaining rights.

But unions now face a new hurdle in Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, who announced last month that he, too, would run in the Democratic primary, even after union leaders tried to talk him out of it. Barrett, who narrowly lost to Walker in 2010, has stronger statewide name recognition than Falk, but he has clashed with unions in the past and refused to take the unions' veto pledge.

Barrett's entry into the race means unions will have to spend even more money to boost Falk's profile. It also puts them in a bind. They are reluctant to publicly attack Barrett for fear of damaging him in the event he wins the primary. Because their ultimate goal remains ousting Walker, they face the prospect of having to spend even more resources in the general election to support a Democrat they don't really trust.

Falk has won the endorsement of the statewide teachers union and the largest union representing public workers. No unions have backed Barrett so far, but the head of the Wisconsin Professional Police Association has praised Barrett and there could be a rift if some unions rally behind the Milwaukee mayor.

Wisconsin's largest public employees union got into trouble last week by directing its members to an Internet video that attacks Barrett and incorrectly implies that Barrett supported Walker's plan to curb bargaining rights. The Wisconsin chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees said it used poor judgment and acknowledged the video was "over the top."

Rich Abelson, executive director of Wisconsin's AFSCME District Council 48, suggested unions wanted to avoid negative attacks on Barrett. "Labor and AFSCME's main priority is to defeat Scott Walker," Abelson said.

Walker, meanwhile, is casting the recall as a battle with out-of-state "union bosses" who want to benefit from taxpayer money.

"This is about sending a message about don't mess with us or we'll take you out no matter who you are," Walker said in an interview with The Associated Press. "For all the talk about collective bargaining, for the national unions it's really about the money."

Walker has already raised more than $12.1 million for the race - the majority of it from out-of-state donors - breaking a previous fundraising record that Walker himself set in the 2010 governor's race. Unions plan to spend at least as much as they spent on the state Senate recall campaign.

Walker's proposal, which passed the Republican-controlled Legislature despite massive protests and all 14 Senate Democrats fleeing to Illinois for three weeks, targeted only public workers and exempted most fire and police officers.

It forced state and local government employees, including teachers, to pay more for health insurance and pension benefits, and stripped away collective bargaining rights except over salary increases no greater than inflation. It also did away with automatic dues withdrawals and forced annual votes for the unions to stay officially recognized.

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Hananel reported from Washington, D.C.

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Follow Sam Hananel's labor coverage on Twitter at http://twitter.com/shananel

Follow Scott Bauer on Twitter at http://twitter.com/sbauerAP

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