08-06-2020  12:13 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission: Initiative Petition 44 Will Nearly Eliminate Racial Disparities for Drug Arrests, Convictions

The initiative would expand access to drug addiction treatment and recovery services, and decriminalize low-level drug possession.

Inslee, Culp Advance to November Ballot in Governor's Race

In early returns, with nearly 17% of the vote, Loren Culp, the police chief of Republic, had the largest share among 35 other candidates.

Portland Police Declare Unlawful Assembly During Protest

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley and Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty addressed event organised by NAACP focused on Black Lives Matter

Shootings Increase During Portland Protests

Between June 1 and end July 31, 2020 there were 125 reported shootings compared to a total of 59 shootings in 2019

NEWS BRIEFS

White Democrats in Congress Falling Short on Reparations Bill

Democracy in Color releases “The White List” showing 79% of democratic House members haven’t cosigned HR 40 despite popular...

New Rule by The U.S. Department of Education Would Misdirect $11M from Oregon Public Schools

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and Reps. Peter DeFazio and Earl Blumenauer called a...

Barbara Bush Foundation Partners with Barbershop Books and Penguin to Provide Child-Friendly Reading Spaces in Baltimore and Detroit Barbershops

Developed in Harlem, Barbershop Books is a community-based program that leverages the cultural significance of barbershops in...

All Classical Portland Awards Grant to Support Emmanuel Henreid's 'Livin' in the Light'

Livin’ in the Light documents Onry’s experience as a Black, male, professional opera and crossover singer in Portland, Ore. ...

House Approves Legislation to Stop Trump Attack on Fair Housing

Ocasio-Cortez, Blumenauer amendment would block rollback of anti-discrimination rule ...

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water...

2 young children shot in yard in Portland suburb

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say two young children were shot while playing in a yard in a suburb of Portland, Oregon.Police in Gresham say the children, ages 3 and 5, were expected to survive. One was shot in the foot and the other in the ankle.KATU reports the shooting happened about...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

OPINION

Da 5 Bloods and America Abroad

Even before I returned to the United States from my combat tour in Vietnam, I had decided that we were fighting an unjust war. ...

Falling Behind: COVID, Climate Change, and Chaos

Multiple Crises, Multiple Obstacles ...

Bill Deiz urges Oregonians to Defend their Constitutional Rights

Elements of federal police, sent in by our president, are nightly tormenting our citizens with tear gas, impact munitions, kidnappings and beatings, and other criminal acts, in order to suppress our rights of free speech and free assembly ...

The Power of Love

Powerful lessons for me today on forgiveness. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Man whose children say has bigoted views wins Missouri race

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Kansas City Republican whose children urged people not to vote for him because of what they say are his racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic views narrowly won his primary for a Missouri House seat, just as he did two years ago before losing the general...

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water...

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water...

ENTERTAINMENT

Viola Davis, LeBron James among honorees at AAFCA TV Honors

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Viola Davis, Sterling K. Brown and LeBron James are among several honorees at the AAFCA TV Honors later this month. The African American Film Critics Association announced the recipients of the second annual event on Wednesday. The virtual ceremony is scheduled to air on...

Review: Deep Purple evokes best years on mighty 'Whoosh!'

Deep Purple, “Whoosh!” (earMUSIC)“Whoosh!” makes it three-for-three for the pairing of Deep Purple and producer Bob Ezrin, an album that at its numerous heights evokes the band’s most successful era of the early ‘70s. With a stable lineup for nearly 20...

How an arrest upended filming of 'Surviving Jeffrey Epstein'

NEW YORK (AP) — The filmmakers behind “Surviving Jeffrey Epstein” moved quickly when Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested on federal charges that she acted as a recruiter for the financier’s sexual abuse.The fourth episode of the new Lifetime docuseries, which was intended to...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Phelps, Ohno open up about suicide, depression in new doc

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Athletes Stephen Scherer, Jeret Peterson and Kelly Catlin have two things in common:...

Joe Biden launches new national ad aimed at Black Americans

DETROIT (AP) — Joe Biden's Democratic presidential campaign has launched a new national ad focused on Black...

'See you in court': ACLU files nearly 400 cases versus Trump

NEW YORK (AP) — The day after Donald Trump’s election in November 2016, the American Civil Liberties...

China sentences 3rd Canadian to death on drug charges

BEIJING (AP) — China has sentenced a third Canadian citizen to death on drug charges amid a steep decline...

N. Korea's escalating virus response raises fear of outbreak

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea is quarantining thousands of people and shipping food and other aid...

Polish LGBT people leaving as post-vote mood grows hostile

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — When a right-wing populist party won the right to govern Poland five years ago, Piotr...

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Heidi Vogt the Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) -- The U.S. military signed a last-minute agreement Friday to transfer its main detention center in the country to Afghan control in six months - a key step toward a long-term pact on U.S. military presence in Afghanistan.

The deal removes a sticking point that had threatened to derail talks between the two countries for a long-term partnership that is critical to defining the U.S. role as it draws down troops here.

The two sides have been in negotiations for months over a partnership deal, and Afghan President Hamid Karzai had set a Friday deadline for the U.S. to hand over the 3,000 Afghans it holds at its Parwan detention facility. On Thursday, President Barack Obama and Karzai discussed the stalled security pact talks in a video conference. White House press secretary Jay Carney said the two leaders noted progress toward completing an agreement "that reinforces Afghan sovereignty while addressing the practical requirements of transition."

The deal signed Friday extends the deadline for handing over the detainees but for the first time spells out an American commitment to a hard transfer date. Under the agreement, the U.S. will still have access to Parwan and will be able to block the release of detainees it thinks should continue to be held.

The accord gives a boost to the stalled talks over formalizing a role for U.S. forces after NATO's scheduled transfer of security responsibility to the Afghan government at the end of 2014. The detainees issue had been a major point of contention, as well as the still unresolved question of night raids by international troops on the homes of suspected militants, which have caused widespread anger among Afghans and which Karzai has demanded be halted.

U.S. and Afghan officials have said that they want a strategic partnership agreement signed by the time a NATO summit convenes in Chicago in May.

Gen. John Allen, the commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, called Friday's deal a sign of real progress toward the larger partnership.

"This is an important step. It is a step forward in our strategic partnership negotiations," Allen told reporters in the capital before signing the agreement alongside Defense Minister Abdul Rahim Wardak.

The deal concerns Parwan, a U.S.-run prison adjoining its Bagram military base north of Kabul. The new deal will put an Afghan general in charge of Parwan within days, according to presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi, but will also give a six-month window to gradually transfer detainees to Afghan oversight.

According to the document, the U.S. will continue to provide logistical support for 12 months and a joint U.S.-Afghan commission will decide on any detainee releases until a more permanent pact is adopted. The joint commission will have to come to a consensus on any such decision, according to U.S. officials involved in the negotiations - a setup that will essentially give U.S. officials power to block any releases they do not agree with.

The officials, who spoke anonymously to discuss confidential talks ahead of the signing, said the first 500 detainees are expected to be transferred in 45 days. The U.S. government had already handed over a few hundred detainees to the Afghans previously.

The officials said the deal does not apply to the approximately 50 non-Afghans at Parwan, who will remain in U.S. custody.

The officials also said that they still need to work out how new detainees will be handled. Currently, the U.S. military assesses whether people captured on the battlefield are a threat and then either lets them go, hands them over to Afghan authorities or sends them to Parwan.

The U.S. also operates what it has described as temporary holding pens for gathering intelligence from detainees in Afghanistan, though officials have confirmed anonymously that some detainees have been held at these centers for up to nine weeks. The agreement does not appear to address these sites.

Friday's memorandum comes as relations between the U.S. and Afghanistan have become more tense in recent weeks following the burning of Qurans and other religious materials at Bagram military base near the capital Kabul, sparking riots and attacks that killed some 30 people.

The U.S. has apologized and said the Qurans came from the Parwan detention center and were taken out because they had extremist messages written in them, but that they should not have been sent to be burned. Karzai said soon after the Quran burnings became public that these types of incidents would not occur if the Afghans were in charge of the detention facility.

The issue of night raids, meanwhile, still has to be resolved.

Karzai has demanded an end to night raids in Afghan villages by coalition forces. The raids target insurgents, but Karzai has said civilians are too often rounded up or killed when raids turn violent. He insists that if there are night raids, Afghan troops should conduct them alone.

The U.S. officials said talks are already underway on a separate memorandum governing night raids.

The U.S.-Afghan strategic partnership is expected to provide for several thousand U.S. troops to stay and train Afghan forces and help with counterterrorism operations. It would outline the legal status of those forces, their operating rules and where they would be based.

The agreement is also seen as a means of assuring the Afghan people that the U.S. does not plan to abandon their country, even as it withdraws its combat forces.

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Associated Press writers Sebastian Abbot and Amir Shah contributed to this report in Kabul.

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