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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Renter Mediation in Effort to Avert Evictions

The landlord-tenant mediation program would provide somewhere between 70 and 100 mediations for Portlanders at risk of losing their housing

Housing Advocates Push to Free Public Funds for Housing from ‘Discriminatory,’ ‘Antiquated’ State System

Currently, organizations must apply for funds through one of 18 regional agencies. Even state officials decry the system.

Blumenauer Introduces Legislation to Reinstate Superfund Taxes; End 25-Year Polluter Tax Holiday That Slowed Toxic Cleanup

President Biden identified restoring payments from polluters into the Superfund Trust Fund as a top priority as part of a major infrastructure plan.

Lents Park Scene of Police Shooting During Protests

Amid protests across Portland against police brutality a man was shot and killed in Lents Park after reports he had a gun. Some protesters described by Mayor Ted Wheeler as a small group of "violent agitators" lit dumpster fires at the ICE and Multnomah County Sheriff's buildings and smashed windows downtown including at the Nike store building and the Oregon History Centre

NEWS BRIEFS

Wyden, Merkley Co-Sponsor Clean Commute for Kids Act

Legislation would invest billion in transition of school buses from diesel to zero-emission vehicles ...

Senator Patterson Passes “Domicile Unknown” Bill

Senate Bill 850 requires an unhoused person’s residence be marked “Domicile Unknown” at their time of death, allowing the state...

Oregon Reports Highest Daily COVID-19 Case Total in 3 Months

Multnomah County has the highest number of new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Wednesday at 167 ...

Senate Confirmation of Vanita Gupta as Associate Attorney General is Historic, Vital for Our Nation

Gupta is the first woman of color ever to be confirmed to the role ...

Five Lucky Oregonians Won a Second Chance at Holiday Winnings

Prizes ranged from jumi,500 to 0,000 depending on the value of the original Scratch-it top prize. ...

Oregon: CDC investigating woman's death after J&J vaccine

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon health officials said Thursday that federal officials are investigating the death of a woman in her 50s who developed a rare blood clot and low platelets within two weeks of receiving the Johnson & Johnson vaccine against COVID-19. The Oregon...

3rd teen arrested in bias crime assault at Albany park

ALBANY, Ore. (AP) — Police say a third teenager has been arrested in connection with a bias-related assault at an Albany park. Police said a 16-year-old boy was arrested on Thursday on suspicion of assault, conspiracy to commit assault, bias crime and tampering with a...

OPINION

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

George Floyd Should Still Be Here

Wade Henderson, interim president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, released the following statement in response to the jury’s conviction of Derek Chauvin ...

The Verdict, The Nation, and Us

The conviction of Derek Chauvin on all three counts in the death of George Floyd represents a much-needed breeze of change ...

Portland Police Union Response to Chauvin Trial Verdict

The Portland Police Association union says in the coming days, their officers will work hard to preserve our community’s right to peacefully protest ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

'Look after my babies': In Ethiopia, a Tigray family's quest

Gunfire crackled near the home of Abraha Kinfe Gebremariam. He hoped it drowned out the cries of his wife, curled up in pain, and the newborn twin daughters wailing beside her. War had broken out in northern Ethiopia’s Tigray region at the worst possible time for Abraha and...

Police chiefs hail Chauvin verdict as a key step to healing

Not long after a jury convicted former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin of killing George Floyd, police chiefs across the U.S. started speaking up. And it wasn't to defend the police. New Orleans Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said convicting Chauvin on Tuesday...

Senate OKs bill to fight hate crimes against Asian Americans

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday overwhelmingly passed a bill that would help combat the rise of hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, a bipartisan denunciation of such violence during the coronavirus pandemic and a modest step toward legislating in a chamber where...

ENTERTAINMENT

Leslie Jordan parlays Instagram fame with new book and album

NEW YORK (AP) — Last year at this time, as much of the world was on lockdown due to the pandemic, Leslie Jordan began posting daily videos of himself on Instagram. The actor known for roles in the “American Horror Story” franchise and “Will & Grace” was staying...

'The Mole Agent' infiltrates a nursing home, and Hollywood

NEW YORK (AP) — “The Mole Agent” infiltrated a nursing home in Chile, and countless of hearts around the world including inside the film academy. The moving documentary about an octogenarian hired as a rookie spy to investigate whether a client’s mother is suffering...

'Rutherford Falls' mixes humor, culture clash, native voices

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In Sierra Teller Ornelas’ family, those who could spin a good tale earned a seat at her grandmom’s expansive dining table, with lesser voices banished to the living room. “There was the feeling of holding court that was really big in my family,” said...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Japan issues 3rd virus emergency in Tokyo, Osaka area

TOKYO (AP) — Japan declared a third state of emergency for Tokyo and three western prefectures on Friday amid...

EXPLAINER: What does Japan's virus state of emergency mean

TOKYO (AP) — Japan on Friday declared a state of emergency to curb a rapid coronavirus resurgence, the third...

Panel: End commanders' power to block military sex cases

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Pentagon panel is recommending that decisions to prosecute service members for sexual...

UK apologizes for racism in memorials to WWI dead

LONDON (AP) — British authorities apologized Thursday after an investigation found that at least 161,000 mostly...

Sanctions-battered Iran, weary of pandemic, faces worst wave

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — As Iran faces what looks like its worst wave of the coronavirus pandemic yet, Tehran...

Scientists get creative to carry on research during pandemic

SAN LORENZO, Panama (AP) — Biologist Claudio Monteza pushed through thick vegetation to install a camera near a...

Albina Highway Covers
Maggie Michael the Associated Press

CAIRO (AP) -- Egyptians ranging from soccer fans to lawmakers blamed the country's military rulers for a bloody post-match riot Thursday as anger mounted over the failure of police to stop the violence when a narrow stadium exit turned into a death trap in a seaside city north of the capital.

A network of soccer fans known as Ultras vowed vengeance, accusing the police of intentionally letting rivals attack them because they have been at the forefront of protests over the past year, first against former leader Hosni Mubarak and now the military.

Thousands of protesters converged on Cairo's Tahrir Square - the epicenter of the uprising that ousted Mubarak last year - carrying the red flag of the city's Al-Ahly soccer club and the national banner. They then marched to the nearby Interior Ministry to protest the police inaction and call for retribution for the 74 people who died in the world's worst soccer violence in 15 years.

The protesters raised flags of Al-Ahly and Zamalek, another top team with its own Ultras group, and Egyptian flags. Some held black banners reading: "Mourning."

Survivors and witnesses described people falling from the bleachers and other scenes of chaos after as fans from the local Al-Masry team in Port Said chased supporters of the visiting Al-Ahly club with knives, clubs and stones. Hundreds fled into the exit corridor, only to be crushed against a locked gate, their rivals attacking from behind.

"The lights went off. The doors of the corridor were locked and sealed with a chain," said Sayyed Hassan, 22, who suffered a broken leg. He sat on the pavement with other mourners outside the morgue in Cairo, where many of the dead were taken.

"We weren't able to get out. I don't remember anything else," he said, adding that he had lost his 25-year-old friend in the stampede.

The riot at the stadium in Port Said erupted when Al-Masry fans stormed the field following a rare 3-1 win against Al-Ahly, one of Egypt's most popular clubs. Some Al-Ahly fans said they had hung banners making fun of Al-Masry supporters in Port Said before the game, apparently provoking the local fans to riot despite their victory.

Ultras who support Cairo's Al-Ahly and Zamalek clubs have long been bitter enemies of the police who wielded wide-ranging powers under Mubarak-era emergency law. The fans' anti-police songs, peppered with curses, usually go viral on the Internet, an expression of the hatred many Egyptians feel toward security forces.

"They want to punish us and execute us for our participation in the revolution against suppression," Ultras who back the Cairo-based Al-Ahly club said in a statement. They vowed a "new war in defense of our revolution."

The police force, which has been at the heart of the Egyptian grievances leading to the uprising, has remained a source of tension after Mubarak's ouster. The police have been accused of continuing to use heavy-handed tactics and resisting reform. But they also found themselves at times unable to manage crowds, fearing they would be vilified.

The stadium riot came on the one-year anniversary of one of the most violent days of the 18-day anti-Mubarak uprising. On Feb. 2 last year, in what became known as the "Battle of the Camel," Mubarak loyalists on camels and horses attacked protesters at Tahrir Square, leading to nearly two days of battles with rocks, firebombs and slabs of concrete. Ultras, along with members of the Muslim Brotherhood, were key in defending the square from the attackers.

Prime Minister Kamal el-Ganzouri, in an emergency parliamentary session, announced he had dissolved the Egyptian Soccer Federation's board and referred its members for questioning by prosecutors about the violence. He also said the governor of Port Said province and the area's police chief have resigned.

Several lawmakers said the lapse was intentional, aimed at stoking the country's insecurity since Mubarak's fall on Feb. 11.

Parliament Speaker Saad el-Katatni, of the Muslim Brotherhood, accused security authorities of hesitating to act, putting "the revolution in danger."

"This is a complete crime," said Abbas Mekhimar, head of parliament's defense committee. "This is part of the scenario of fueling chaos against Egypt."

More details about what happened after Wednesday's match emerged as mourners gathered outside the morgue in Cairo and the headquarters for the Al-Ahly club.

Witnesses said Al-Masry supporters, armed with knives, sticks and stones, chased Al-Ahly players and fans, who ran toward the exits and up the stands to escape while lines of riot police in the stadium largely did nothing to intervene. As many Al-Ahly fans crowded into the corridor leading out of the stadium, they were trapped, with the doors at the other end locked.

At one point, the stadium lights went out, plunging it into darkness. The TV sportscaster announcing the match said authorities shut them off to "calm the situation."

"Layers of people" were "stuck over each other because there was no other exit," Al-Ahly fan Ahmed Ghaffar tweeted on Thursday. "We were between two choices, either death coming from behind us, or the closed doors."

He said Al-Masry fans beat Al-Ahly fans who fell on the floor.

Al-Masry fan, Mohammed Mosleh, who posted his account on Facebook, said he saw "thugs with weapons" on his side in the stadium where police presence was meager.

"This was unbelievable," he said. "We were supposed to be celebrating, not killing people. We defeated Al-Ahly, something I saw twice only in my lifetime. All the people were happy. Nobody expected this."

The Interior Ministry said 74 people died, including one police officer, and 248 were injured, 14 of them police. A local health official initially said 1,000 people were injured and it was not clear how severely. Security forces arrested 47 people for involvement in the violence, the statement said.

Health ministry official Hisham Sheha said the deaths were caused by stabs by sharp tools, brain hemorrhage and concussions. "All those carried to hospitals were already dead bodies," Sheha told state TV.

A number of political parties called on the Egyptian parliament to pass no-confidence vote against the government of el-Ganzouri, a Mubarak-era politician appointed by the much-criticized ruling military council.

Osama Yassin, head of sports committee in parliament, said the parliament holds the interior minister, who is in charge of police, responsible for the violence. He also demanded ouster of Prosecutor-General Mahmoud Abdel-Meguid.

The U.S. and Britain expressed condolences.

"I urge the Egyptian authorities to set up a transparent inquiry to uncover the causes of the tragedy and hold those responsible to account," Britain's Middle East minister Alistair Burt said.

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Associated Press writer Aya Batrawy contributed to this report.

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