09-29-2020  1:00 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Blumenauer Announces Expected Vote on Federal Restaurant Relief Legislation

Under the terms of the legislation, grants would provide restaurants assistance for operating costs such as payroll and benefits, food, utilities, rent, and more.

Governor Seeks Review of Police Protest Response in Oregon

Videos from the demonstration in downtown Portland showed police grabbing a news photographer and pushing him to ground as he was trying to document them tackling and detaining a person on a sidewalk.

Portland Braces as Right-Wing Extremists Rally

Gov. Kate Brown warned violence would not be tolerated as right wing extremists converge on Portland "looking for a fight"

A Reminder: Delta Park is Vanport

As extreme right-wing, white supremacist groups prepare to converge on Portland tomorrow, here is a reminder of the historical significance of the place they plan to overrun and the stories of the people that lived there.

NEWS BRIEFS

Free COVID-19 Testing Tuesday, Sept 29

Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center will be offering free screening for all ages. ...

Oregon Reports 181 New COVID-19 Cases, No New Deaths

Although the curve is not flat, the number of cases is fluctuateing slightly less, with 21 new cases in Multnomah County. ...

Teletha Aldridge Benjamin Named as Recipient of the Gladys McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award

Benjamin says, “I learned about supporting my community from the examples of the adults in my neighborhood, and no one ever thought...

Blumenauer Statement on Planned White Supremacist Rally in Portland

“These are evil people looking for a fight and national media attention. Let’s not give them what they want." ...

Wish Launches $2 Million Fund To Support Black-owned Businesses

The Wish Local Empowerment Program is set to impact more than 4,000 small businesses across the US ...

Man dies in fire at Vancouver motel being used as virus site

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — A 32-year-old man was killed in a fire Saturday at a former motel in east Vancouver, Washington, that is being used as a quarantine and isolation site for people exposed to COVID-19, as well as a temporary homeless shelter.The name of the victim has not yet been...

Police: Man dies after cliff fall at Oregon coast

TILLAMOOK, Ore. (AP) — A 43-year-old man died after plunging off a cliff into the surf Sunday at the Oregon coast, Oregon State Police said. Steven Gastelum of Seaside, Oregon, climbed a tree on the cliff’s edge along the Devil’s Cauldron Overlook Trail in Oswald West State...

No. 2 Alabama's electric WR Waddle taking on bigger role

Jaylen Waddle has been one of the nation's most dangerous return men, and a big-play receiver since first stepping on the football field for Alabama.The only thing holding him back: Four star receivers, one ball. There's still only one ball for the second-ranked Crimson Tide, but Waddle is higher...

No. 2 Crimson Tide rolls on offense to 38-19 win over Mizzou

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Nick Saban has never lost a season opener while coaching Alabama.Then again, he'd never had one like this.Yet despite an offseason largely scrapped by the coronavirus pandemic, and a delayed start to the season, Saban's second-ranked Crimson Tide looked just fine as they...

OPINION

Civil Rights Leaders Endorse Sarah Iannarone for Portland Mayor

The list of new endorsements include National Black Lives Matter activist and Campaign Zero Founder Deray Mckesson, civil rights attorney Bobbin Singh and others. ...

When Black Women's Lives Matter All Lives Will Matter

Brazen disregard for the lives and safety of Black women goes back over 400 years in U.S. history with the definition of Black women’s bodies as property at the complete disposal of white slave-owners ...

Sarah Iannarone Demands Action from Mayor Regarding Planned Right-Wing Demonstrations; Opens Safe Space for Portlanders

BIPOC, Queer, and other marginalized Portlanders will bear the brunt of these attacks simply because of their identity or the color of their skin. ...

National Bar Association Statement on Breonna Taylor Decision

Not only was justice not served, the desultory and insufficient result we received today was also unacceptably slow in manifesting. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Harris to voters: Don't give up as Trump rushes court pick

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Kamala Harris urged voters on Monday not to be discouraged by Republican efforts to fill a Supreme Court seat before the election, charging it's the GOP's goal to make people feel like their votes don't matter. “We will not give up, and we will not give in," the...

Jury finds white nationalist guilty of rape threat

CONCORD, N.H (AP) — A self-proclaimed white nationalist who rose to prominence during a deadly 2017 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, was found guilty Monday by a federal jury of threatening to rape the wife of a man who was part of a racist group he felt was harassing and bullying...

Healthy US economy failed to narrow racial gaps in 2019

WASHINGTON (AP) — The solid growth that the United States enjoyed before the viral pandemic paralyzed the economy this spring failed to reduce racial disparities in Americans' income and wealth from 2016 through 2019, according to a Federal Reserve report Monday.Though Black and Hispanic...

ENTERTAINMENT

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Worldwide death toll from coronavirus eclipses 1 million

NEW DELHI (AP) — The worldwide death toll from the coronavirus eclipsed 1 million on Tuesday, nine months...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
Trimet Take the Survey
Errin Haines the Associated Press



Demonstrators in downtown Portland

ATLANTA (AP) -- Jason Woody immediately recognized a shared struggle with many of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators: The 2007 college graduate has been out of work for two years, and it's been longer since he's seen a doctor. He also noticed something else - the lack of brown faces on the front lines of the Occupy movement.

"When I started out here ... I realized there was not a lot of diversity out here," said Woody, who is black and graduated from Morehouse College and has camped in a downtown Atlanta park with other protesters for more than a week. "It's changed in the course of the past week. I'd like to see that grow."

The Skanner News Video: Occupy Portland

The outcry against the nation's financial institutions that has swept the country in recent weeks has crossed many boundaries, including class, gender and age. But a stubborn hurdle in many cities has been a lack of racial inclusion, something noted by organizers and participants alike.

"We, the 99 percent, have to be reaching out to the cross section of the communities that we live in," said Tim Franzen, one of the organizers of the Occupy Atlanta movement. "If you come down to the park and spend a day I think you might have a hard time saying this is an all-white movement. We are reaching out, but we've got some bridges to build."

The absence of diversity is particularly notable given that some of the larger issues surrounding the Occupy movement - including the economy, foreclosures and unemployment - are disproportionately affecting people of color. And the legacy of activism present in some minority communities seems a natural segue for such a cause, which has been linked to the strategies of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

African-Americans are more inclined to rally around social justice than financial literacy causes, said John Hope Bryant, founder and chief executive officer of Operation HOPE, a non-profit organization that educates underserved and low-income Americans about personal financial responsibility.

"If this was about someone unjustly being brutalized, that's an easier thing for us to mobilize around," said Bryant, who is black, citing the recent Troy Davis death penalty case in Georgia, a diverse protest that attracted global attention last month.

The Occupy Wall Street protest in New York has been more diverse than other cities. Although the majority of protesters are white, many blacks and a smattering of Asians and Latinos have participated.

Among them is Omar Henriquez, a Long Island resident who emigrated from El Salvador. He passed out Spanish-language copies of the Occupied Wall Street Journal on Friday. He has been taking the newspaper to Latino and immigrant rights groups. He also is unemployed.

"That's why I'm here," said Henriquez, 55. "It's incumbent on us, Latinos here, to bring more Latinos here. We don't have to be invited to come, we just come."

On Saturday, the nation's capital provided a sharp contrast: A couple dozen mostly white protesters congregated in Washington's Freedom Plaza. They were separate from Occupy DC but hold similar ideals. Not far away, thousands marched to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. Their rallying cry was similar, if not identical - yet the vast majority were black.

A few men played the bongo drums at Freedom Plaza, while a band at the nearby rally led by the Rev. Al Sharpton near the Washington Monument played a soulful, jazzy rendition of Michael Jackson's "Human Nature" - albeit with a white saxophonist - and the crowd sang along knowingly as a speaker recited the familiar opening theme to the "Tom Joyner Morning Show."

Phil Calhoun, 44, an engineer from Crofton, Md., who was checking out the various protests, marveled at the racial disparity between the two groups even though they were preaching similar ideologies.

"Maybe it's just the nature of our society, set this up this way," he said. "But it's one thing I think we need to bridge. We need to bridge that gap."

In Baltimore, there are people representing different racial, ethnic, age and income groups, but not in proportion to the city's population. Occupy Baltimore group organizer C.T. Lawrence Butler, who is white said there has been talk of going out to communities around the city to try to attract more people, but the group is just building steam and hasn't had a chance to put together official outreach. Instead, individuals have been reaching out to communities on their own, a strategy that may work better.

"Everybody would like more diversity," Butler said. "The group is focusing on creating a place where everybody can feel safe speaking up."

Most of the people at Occupy Boston on Friday appeared to be young and white, with just a handful of blacks, Latinos and Asians in an area not far from the city's Chinatown neighborhood. Anthony Messina, a 19-year-old biotech student at Middlesex Community College who is white, said he sees the beginnings of racial diversity at the protests, but that the numbers are nowhere near where they should be.

"It's not a representative group, and I don't think anyone would lie and tell you that it is," Messina said, adding that whites have to be careful when reaching out to minorities to join the movement. "You don't want to come off like you're preaching that you know what's good for them."

Bryant, of Operation HOPE, added that while the economic crisis has hit the middle class hard, blacks have reacted differently than whites, equating money with self-image and feeling ashamed and responsible for their financial situation, rather than angry.

"Money for us is a badge," Bryant said. "Money for them is a vehicle. We don't want to be seen. We just want to hide, and hope the storyline changes."

Blacks also don't want to be seen as just complaining. Former activists like Ambassador Andrew Young have pointed out that the Occupy movement is still in a nascent stage, with protesters more focused on what they're against rather than what they're for.

In Chicago, organizers have started canvassing neighborhoods on Chicago's largely minority South Side, a project they're calling Occupy the `Hood.

"We're sending people into different neighborhoods and we're looking into town halls in different communities," said Kelvin Ho, 21, an economics major at the University of Chicago and an Occupy Chicago press committee leader.

Ho, an American whose parents were born in Taiwan, said issues of race have come up during the group's twice-daily general assembly meetings. At first, most of the people moderating the meetings were white men. But participants noted that, and "now we're making an active effort to have people of color and women moderate the meetings."

In Atlanta, Woody said the word didn't get out clearly enough to African-Americans when the movement began. Now, he's trying to get more historically black colleges involved, such as his alma mater.

"I felt that my voice should be represented," Woody said. "A lot of people feel like it won't make a difference. I wish more people would realize that the more support we can show, the more powerful it makes our movement."

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Associated Press writers Eric Tucker in Washington, Sarah Brumfield in Baltimore, Mark Pratt in Boston, Karen Matthews in New York and Carla K. Johnson in Chicago contributed to this report.

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Follow Errin Haines at www.twitter.com/emarvelous

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