07-13-2020  10:36 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Federal Officers Use Tear Gas on Portland Protesters

Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty calls officers' behavior "reckless and aggressive" after 26-year-old man struck on head and injured by an impact munition

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

NEWS BRIEFS

NNPA Livestreams With Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Val Demings

The audience has an opportunity to be an interactive part of the interview ...

Black Women Often Ignored By Social Justice Movements

‘Intersectional invisibility’ may lead to Black women’s exclusion, study finds ...

Deadline is July 15 to Pay Portland's $35 Arts Tax

The tax, approved by voters in 2012, supports arts education and grants ...

Oregon National Guard Completes Wildland Firefighter Training

The training was conducted using funds that were allocated to the Department of Defense by Congress to enable the National Guard to...

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Mayor: US Marshals probing protester's shooting at protest

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The U.S. Marshals Service is investigating after a protester was hospitalized in critical condition over the weekend after being hit in the head by a weapon fired by a federal law enforcement officer, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said.In a statement late Sunday, Wheeler...

Oregon reports 332 new coronavirus cases, 2 deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The number of new coronavirus cases in Oregon rose on Sunday to 332, the Oregon Health Authority said.Meanwhile, two more people with COVID-19 died, bringing the state's death toll to 234, the agency said. The latest deaths were an 86-year-old woman in Malheur County...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Commissioner Hardesty Responds To Federal Troop Actions Towards Protesters

This protester is still fighting for their life and I want to be clear: this should never have happened. ...

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Polish president wins 2nd term after bitter campaign

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish President Andrzej Duda declared victory Monday in a runoff election in which he narrowly won a second five-year term, acknowledging the campaign he ran was often too harsh as he appealed for unity and forgiveness.The close race followed a bitter campaign between...

Legal experts review Black Minnesota teen's life sentence

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — An independent panel of national legal experts will review the conviction of an African American teenager who was sentenced to life in prison nearly two decades ago for the murder of a little girl, struck by a stray bullet while studying in her south Minneapolis home,...

Up next for police defunding advocates: Win local elections

ATLANTA (AP) — Amid Americans’ national reckoning on racism, a coalition of progressive groups is forming a political action committee to back local candidates who want to redirect money away from traditional police departments into other social services. An outgrowth of the...

ENTERTAINMENT

With new name and album, The Chicks' voices ring loud again

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Dixie Chicks are no more. Breaking their ties to the South, The Chicks are stepping into a new chapter in their storied career with their first new music in 14 years. The Texas trio of Emily Strayer, Martie Maguire and Natalie Maines have been teasing new music...

Jada and Will Smith reveal marriage trouble on Facebook show

LOS ANGELES (AP) — With their marriage under social-media scrutiny, Jada Pinkett Smith and Will Smith reaffirmed their commitment to each other as Pinkett Smith admitted to having a relationship with musician August Alsina when she and Smith were separated.In a one-on-one conversation Friday...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 19-25

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 19-25.July 19: Actress Helen Gallagher (“Ryan’s Hope”) is 94. Country singer Sue Thompson is 94. Singer Vikki Carr is 80. Musician Commander Cody is 76. Actor George Dzundza (“Hack,” “Law and Order”) is 75....

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Look out, Mars: Here we come with a fleet of spacecraft

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Mars is about to be invaded by planet Earth — big time.Three countries...

Body found in search of lake for ‘Glee’ star Naya Rivera

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A body was found Monday at a Southern California lake during the search for...

Millennials and boomers: Pandemic pain, by the generation

CINCINNATI (AP) — Millennials, you're taking a big hit — again. And you're not OK, either,...

North Macedonia: Ballot boxes carried to quarantined homes

SKOPJE, North Macedonia (AP) — Election officials in North Macedonia carried ballot boxes to the homes of...

Thousands in Russia's Far East protest governor's jailing

MOSCOW (AP) — Thousands of protesters gathered Monday for a third straight day of massive rallies in...

Polish president wins 2nd term after bitter campaign

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish President Andrzej Duda declared victory Monday in a runoff election in which...

McMenamins
Errin Haines the Associated Press



Demonstrators in downtown Portland

ATLANTA (AP) -- Jason Woody immediately recognized a shared struggle with many of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators: The 2007 college graduate has been out of work for two years, and it's been longer since he's seen a doctor. He also noticed something else - the lack of brown faces on the front lines of the Occupy movement.

"When I started out here ... I realized there was not a lot of diversity out here," said Woody, who is black and graduated from Morehouse College and has camped in a downtown Atlanta park with other protesters for more than a week. "It's changed in the course of the past week. I'd like to see that grow."

The Skanner News Video: Occupy Portland

The outcry against the nation's financial institutions that has swept the country in recent weeks has crossed many boundaries, including class, gender and age. But a stubborn hurdle in many cities has been a lack of racial inclusion, something noted by organizers and participants alike.

"We, the 99 percent, have to be reaching out to the cross section of the communities that we live in," said Tim Franzen, one of the organizers of the Occupy Atlanta movement. "If you come down to the park and spend a day I think you might have a hard time saying this is an all-white movement. We are reaching out, but we've got some bridges to build."

The absence of diversity is particularly notable given that some of the larger issues surrounding the Occupy movement - including the economy, foreclosures and unemployment - are disproportionately affecting people of color. And the legacy of activism present in some minority communities seems a natural segue for such a cause, which has been linked to the strategies of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

African-Americans are more inclined to rally around social justice than financial literacy causes, said John Hope Bryant, founder and chief executive officer of Operation HOPE, a non-profit organization that educates underserved and low-income Americans about personal financial responsibility.

"If this was about someone unjustly being brutalized, that's an easier thing for us to mobilize around," said Bryant, who is black, citing the recent Troy Davis death penalty case in Georgia, a diverse protest that attracted global attention last month.

The Occupy Wall Street protest in New York has been more diverse than other cities. Although the majority of protesters are white, many blacks and a smattering of Asians and Latinos have participated.

Among them is Omar Henriquez, a Long Island resident who emigrated from El Salvador. He passed out Spanish-language copies of the Occupied Wall Street Journal on Friday. He has been taking the newspaper to Latino and immigrant rights groups. He also is unemployed.

"That's why I'm here," said Henriquez, 55. "It's incumbent on us, Latinos here, to bring more Latinos here. We don't have to be invited to come, we just come."

On Saturday, the nation's capital provided a sharp contrast: A couple dozen mostly white protesters congregated in Washington's Freedom Plaza. They were separate from Occupy DC but hold similar ideals. Not far away, thousands marched to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. Their rallying cry was similar, if not identical - yet the vast majority were black.

A few men played the bongo drums at Freedom Plaza, while a band at the nearby rally led by the Rev. Al Sharpton near the Washington Monument played a soulful, jazzy rendition of Michael Jackson's "Human Nature" - albeit with a white saxophonist - and the crowd sang along knowingly as a speaker recited the familiar opening theme to the "Tom Joyner Morning Show."

Phil Calhoun, 44, an engineer from Crofton, Md., who was checking out the various protests, marveled at the racial disparity between the two groups even though they were preaching similar ideologies.

"Maybe it's just the nature of our society, set this up this way," he said. "But it's one thing I think we need to bridge. We need to bridge that gap."

In Baltimore, there are people representing different racial, ethnic, age and income groups, but not in proportion to the city's population. Occupy Baltimore group organizer C.T. Lawrence Butler, who is white said there has been talk of going out to communities around the city to try to attract more people, but the group is just building steam and hasn't had a chance to put together official outreach. Instead, individuals have been reaching out to communities on their own, a strategy that may work better.

"Everybody would like more diversity," Butler said. "The group is focusing on creating a place where everybody can feel safe speaking up."

Most of the people at Occupy Boston on Friday appeared to be young and white, with just a handful of blacks, Latinos and Asians in an area not far from the city's Chinatown neighborhood. Anthony Messina, a 19-year-old biotech student at Middlesex Community College who is white, said he sees the beginnings of racial diversity at the protests, but that the numbers are nowhere near where they should be.

"It's not a representative group, and I don't think anyone would lie and tell you that it is," Messina said, adding that whites have to be careful when reaching out to minorities to join the movement. "You don't want to come off like you're preaching that you know what's good for them."

Bryant, of Operation HOPE, added that while the economic crisis has hit the middle class hard, blacks have reacted differently than whites, equating money with self-image and feeling ashamed and responsible for their financial situation, rather than angry.

"Money for us is a badge," Bryant said. "Money for them is a vehicle. We don't want to be seen. We just want to hide, and hope the storyline changes."

Blacks also don't want to be seen as just complaining. Former activists like Ambassador Andrew Young have pointed out that the Occupy movement is still in a nascent stage, with protesters more focused on what they're against rather than what they're for.

In Chicago, organizers have started canvassing neighborhoods on Chicago's largely minority South Side, a project they're calling Occupy the `Hood.

"We're sending people into different neighborhoods and we're looking into town halls in different communities," said Kelvin Ho, 21, an economics major at the University of Chicago and an Occupy Chicago press committee leader.

Ho, an American whose parents were born in Taiwan, said issues of race have come up during the group's twice-daily general assembly meetings. At first, most of the people moderating the meetings were white men. But participants noted that, and "now we're making an active effort to have people of color and women moderate the meetings."

In Atlanta, Woody said the word didn't get out clearly enough to African-Americans when the movement began. Now, he's trying to get more historically black colleges involved, such as his alma mater.

"I felt that my voice should be represented," Woody said. "A lot of people feel like it won't make a difference. I wish more people would realize that the more support we can show, the more powerful it makes our movement."

---

Associated Press writers Eric Tucker in Washington, Sarah Brumfield in Baltimore, Mark Pratt in Boston, Karen Matthews in New York and Carla K. Johnson in Chicago contributed to this report.

---

Follow Errin Haines at www.twitter.com/emarvelous

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Port of Seattle Police We Want to Hear
image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
https://www.oregonclinic.com/
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Kevin Saddler