06-18-2019  9:38 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Winter Light Festival 2020 Now Accepting Art Submissions

Portland Winter Light Festival 2020 is now accepting art submissions for the annual event ...

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

Forum to Follow Congressional Hearing on Bill to Form a Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals ...

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

New shows are Alice in Wonderland, Macbeth and All’s Well That Ends Well. ...

Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

3 cougar sightings reported by residents in Oregon county

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Residents have reported seeing cougars within city boundaries in an Oregon county.The Oregonian/OregonLive reported Tuesday that the animals were reported three times this month in communities in Hood River County.The county sheriff's office and Hood River Police...

Oregon removes assisted suicide wait for gravely ill people

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon House sent the governor a measure Tuesday amending the state's assisted suicide law by removing the waiting period for people who have less than 15 days to live.It's a move that opponents say amounts to an expansion of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, arguing...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Democratic panel to open debate on reparations for slavery

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than a decade's absence, the case for reparations is returning to Capitol Hill, this time amid a growing discussion in the Democratic Party about what the country might owe to the descendants of slaves in the United States.Actor and activist Danny Glover and...

Prosecutors: Suspect made album art with church arson photos

OPELOUSAS, La. (AP) — The suspect in three Louisiana church arsons took photos and videos of the fires while they were burning and shared them with his friends, federal prosecutors said Monday.Prosecutors presented the images during a detention hearing for Holden Matthews, 21, saying they...

John Cusack apologizes for anti-Semitic tweet

Actor John Cusack is apologizing for tweeting an anti-Semitic cartoon and quotation after defending the post, then deleting it.The image showed a blue Star of David above a hand pushing down on a group of people accompanied by a quote frequently misattributed to the philosopher Voltaire: "To learn...

ENTERTAINMENT

Final 2 competitive games help NBA Finals in ratings

NEW YORK (AP) — The two top winter sports crowned their champions as summer neared, separated by exactly 10 million viewers.The sixth game of the NBA Finals, where the Toronto Raptors dethroned the depleted Golden State Warriors, was seen by 18.76 million viewers in the United States,...

Jenni Rivera biopic in the works with her family's support

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The late Mexican-American singer and activist Jenni Rivera always dreamed of a biopic about her turbulent and inspirational life. Now, seven years after her untimely death, that dream is coming true.A feature film based on Rivera's life is officially in the works from...

John Cusack apologizes for anti-Semitic tweet

Actor John Cusack is apologizing for tweeting an anti-Semitic cartoon and quotation after defending the post, then deleting it.The image showed a blue Star of David above a hand pushing down on a group of people accompanied by a quote frequently misattributed to the philosopher Voltaire: "To learn...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Prosecutor: Navy SEAL bragged about killing captive in Iraq

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A decorated Navy SEAL stabbed to death a wounded and captive teenage Islamic State fighter...

Democratic panel to open debate on reparations for slavery

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than a decade's absence, the case for reparations is returning to Capitol...

Lawmakers will hear from pilots who have criticized Boeing

The president of the pilots' union at American Airlines says Boeing made mistakes in its design of the 737 Max and...

Porous border could hinder efforts to stem spread of Ebola

MPONDWE, Uganda (AP) — Several well-trodden paths crisscross this lush area where people walk between Congo...

Russia, China block UN from saying NKorea violated sanctions

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Russia and China have blocked the U.N. Security Council committee monitoring...

Facebook's currency Libra faces financial, privacy pushback

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is getting a taste of the regulatory pushback it will face as it creates a...

McMenamins
Shawn Pogatchnik Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) -- Tariq Jahan has yet to bury his son, one of three Pakistani men run down and killed this week as they tried to guard family shops from marauding carloads of looters.

Yet amidst his personal grief, Jahan is focused on the need for peace in Birmingham, a multicultural city of 1 million that has suffered repeated clashes between its South Asians, Caribbean blacks and the largely white police force. He wants that cycle of enmity and bloodshed to end with the death of his 21-year-old boy, Haroon, and his friends Shahzad Ali, 30, and Abdul Musavir, 31.

"I lost my son. Blacks, Asians, whites: We all live in the same community. Why do we have to kill one another? Why are we doing this? Step forward if you want to lose your sons. Otherwise, calm down and go home, please," Jahan appealed hours after giving the kiss of life to his dying son on the pavement nearby his home.

His audience included both international TV cameras and huddles of angry young Muslim men debating the need to strike back - against those in the black community they blame for Wednesday's hit-and-run attack.

A day later, Jahan's face and message were on the front page of many British newspapers and a string of lawmakers praised him in Parliament.

Jahan told The AP on his doorstep that he hoped to do "anything I can do to stop the situation from getting any worse." He was still awaiting the return of his son's body, which under Islamic law should have been buried within 24 hours of his slaying. Police forensics specialists still were studying the bodies Thursday.

But Jahan expressed doubts that the 20-something generation would listen to their elders and reject the impulse for vengeance.

"To the kids, if you are listening to a grey-bearded old fellow that you have no respect for, then try to understand this: When you are my age, you will look back at your lives and think how stupid you were," he said.

On nearby doorsteps, young men offered vivid and brutal predictions of what should happen next.

"We'll hunt down these black men, cut off their heads and feed them to our dogs," said Amir Hawid, 20, who lives near the Dudley Road scene of the killing and trained in the same amateur boxing club as Jahan's son. "With Allah you can run but you can't hide."

While the riots that have swept England this week have involved looters of every creed and hue, the street anarchy also has exposed racial fault lines that run beneath the poorest urban quarters, particularly in Birmingham, Britain's second-largest city and its most ethnically diverse. A fifth of the city's "Brummies" are Muslims, most commonly of Pakistani origin. About 7 percent are black, mostly Caribbean, in background.

The vengeful statements of some Muslim men mirror the violence of previous years, such as in 2005, when a neighboring Birmingham district suffered two nights of street fighting between Caribbean and Asian gangs over unsubstantiated rumors that a group of Pakistani men had raped a 14-year-old Jamaican girl. Two men were stabbed to death, firefighters faced machete-wielding mobs, and Muslim graves were desecrated.

The west side also suffered riots in 1981, 1985 and 1991 fueled by ethnic-minority hatred of white police and black resentment of the Asians' dominant position as shopkeepers.

Birmingham's police say they already have arrested the suspected 32-year-old driver of the car on suspicion of murder and 11 others they consider involved in the attacks on the Muslim-owned shops of Dudley Road.

On Tuesday night, scores of young Muslim men filled the sidewalks outside Dudley Road's sidewalk strip of nine small businesses and a mosque. They armed themselves with clubs and stones after complaining that police had failed to stop looters the night before.

They pelted several cars of looters who trawled up and down the street seeking vulnerable businesses, while many locals were still at midnight Ramadan prayers.

After 1 a.m. Wednesday, witnesses said, two carloads of would-be looters did a U-turn at the top of the road, gunned their engines, and accelerated towards the packed sidewalk. They say the first car narrowly missed the scattering crowd but the second directly struck the three men, throwing them high in the air and 20 to 30 feet down the road.

Jahan said he heard the thump of the car's impact followed by wails of terror. He ran and began trying to resuscitate one of the smashed bodies. Only then did a friend tell him that the crumpled, body behind him was his son's.

The other two men were declared dead at the scene, while Haroon Jahan expired in a nearby hospital. Jahan, who also led Muslim prayers at a midnight candlelight vigil at the scene of the killings, said his faith would not allow him to seek blame or vengeance.

"I don't blame the government, I don't blame the police, I don't blame nobody," he said. "I'm a Muslim, I believe in divine fate and destiny, and it was his destiny and his fate. Now he's gone. And may Allah forgive him and bless him."

---

Associated Press writers Jeffrey Schaeffer and Sohrab Monemi in Birmingham contributed to this report.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives