11-28-2021  4:02 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

City’s Budget Windfall Means More for Police, Despite NAACP Demands

Group calls out lack of engagement from City Hall.

Oregon Resists Dropping Controversial Investments

Oregon residents are increasingly pushing for the state to divest from fossil fuel companies and other controversial investments, but the state treasury is resisting and putting the onus on the Legislature.

COVID-19: Oregon Drops Outdoor Mask Requirement

Oregon still has in place, a statewide indoor mask mandate for all public settings

Oregon Supreme Court Dismisses Challenge to Legislative Maps

The Oregon Supreme Court on Monday dismissed two challenges filed by Republicans to new state legislative districts approved by the Legislature in September.

NEWS BRIEFS

Vsp Global Partners With Black EyeCare Perspective to Eliminate Inequities and Increase Representation of People of Color in the Eye Care Industry

Partnership includes scholarships, leadership development, and outreach to prospective optometrists ...

Shop Local and Earn Free Parking With Parking Kitty

Find the purrfect gift for your loved ones by supporting small businesses and shopping local this holiday season, thanks to the...

Oregon Records More Than 5,000 COVID-19 Related Deaths

Today, Oregon health officials reported 103 new COVID-19 related deaths, bringing the state’s death toll to more than 5,000 ...

Northwest Library Site Acquired as Part of Multnomah County Library Capital Bond Projects

Location will help library move towards permanent spaces, expedite other bond projects ...

Four LGBTQ Leaders to Be Inducted Into Hall of Fame

Governor Kate Brown included in 2021 class of inductees to be honored at Victory Fund’s 30th Anniversary Gala ...

Northwest residents urged to stay alert as storms roll in

Weather officials urged Northwest residents to remain alert Sunday as more rain was predicted to fall in an area with lingering water from extreme weather earlier this month. “There's some good news and some pending news,” said Steve Reedy, a meteorologist with the National...

Community systems offer alternative paths for solar growth

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Strolling his church's rooftop among 630 solar panels, Bishop Richard Howell Jr. acknowledged climate change isn't the most pressing concern for his predominantly Black congregation — even though it disproportionately harms people of color and the poor. ...

No. 25 Arkansas beats Missouri, caps best season since 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Sam Pittman grinned for almost the entirety of his postgame press conference Friday night. The Arkansas coach and his team had done something no others ever had. The No. 25 Razorbacks capped their regular season with a 34-17 victory over Missouri,...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz returning to Arkansas for rivalry game

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Just 45 miles of interstate highway separate Eli Drinkwitz from where he started and where he is now as Missouri's head football coach. Raised in the small Arkansas town of Alma, Drinkwitz will come full circle Friday when his Tigers visit No. 25...

OPINION

State is Painting Lipstick on Its One-of-a-kind, Long-term-care Law

Starting in January, the unpopular law imposes a stiff new tax of 58 cents per 0 earned for every worker in the state ...

Giving Thanks

Just by being alive we can be sure of having moments of sadness as well as happiness. When you’re active in politics, you experience both wins and losses. Sometimes it can be hard to feel grateful. ...

Acting on Climate will Require an Emphasis on Environmental Justice

Climate change affects us all, but its effects aren’t distributed equally. ...

Small Businesses Cannot Survive With Current Level of Postal Service

At The Skanner News office we received an important piece of correspondence that was postmarked June 12, 2021, and delivered to us on November 4, 2021. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Carrie Meek, pioneering Black former congresswoman, dies

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Carrie Meek, the grandchild of a slave and a sharecropper’s daughter who became one of the first Black Floridians elected to Congress since Reconstruction, died Sunday. She was 95. Meek died at her home in Miami after a long illness, family...

Key moments since Jussie Smollett reported Chicago attack

CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett goes to trial Monday on charges that he lied to Chicago police when the former “Empire” actor and R&B singer reported being the victim of a racist and homophobic attack nearly three years ago. Some key moments in the story: Jan. 22, 2019 ...

Trial set to start on charges Smollett faked racist attack

CHICAGO (AP) — A popular actor steps out onto the street and is brutally reminded that, despite his fame and wealth, places still exist where the color of his skin and sexual orientation put him in danger. That was the story that ricocheted around the world after Jussie...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Get Back' series dispels, and confirms, some Beatle myths

NEW YORK (AP) — For 50 years, the fixed narrative had the Beatles' “Let it Be” recording session as a miserable experience with a band where members were sick of each other, sick of their work and in the process of breaking up. The nearly 8-hour, Peter Jackson-produced...

Towering musical theater master Stephen Sondheim dies at 91

NEW YORK (AP) — Stephen Sondheim, the songwriter who reshaped the American musical theater in the second half of the 20th century with his intelligent, intricately rhymed lyrics, his use of evocative melodies and his willingness to tackle unusual subjects, has died. He was 91. ...

Chris Diamantopoulos builds a hot career, on screen and off

NEW YORK (AP) — When you see Chris Diamantopoulos on screen, you may get a sense of déjà vu. The actor regularly pops up in movies and TV shows as a variety of characters, and he's fine if you find yourself trying to place where you've seen him before. “I want people...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Israeli president celebrates Hanukkah at West Bank site

HEBRON, West Bank (AP) — Israel’s president on Sunday visited one of the most contentious spots in the...

In Iraq, family mourns daughter who drowned crossing to UK

IRBIL, Iraq (AP) — Snow globes, teddy bears and makeup brushes — these were the trinkets left behind in...

Trial set to start on charges Smollett faked racist attack

CHICAGO (AP) — A popular actor steps out onto the street and is brutally reminded that, despite his fame and...

EXPLAINER: Can world powers curb Iran in new nuclear talks?

JERUSALEM (AP) — Can the landmark 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers be restored? As Iran and six...

EU plane to monitor migrants on Channel shores after deaths

CALAIS, France (AP) — The EU’s border agency will dispatch a plane to monitor the shores of the English...

Asian leaders at economic summit vow to help Afghanistan

ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan (AP) — The leaders of several Asian countries called for boosting their economic ties and...

Russell Contreras Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) -- The widening wealth gap between whites and minorities has wiped out gains made over that last 30 years and could foreshadow even more inequality if something isn't done to address it, National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial told the Associated Press on Tuesday.

Speaking a day before the National Urban League begins its annual convention, Morial said new census data analyzed by the Pew Research Center shows that blacks and Latinos have especially been hit hard by the economic meltdown. He said the report is a "wake-up call" that those communities need more investments for long-term job creation.

"A paramount issue for this nation for the 21st century is to ensure the narrowing and closing of the racial wealth gap," said Morial, a former mayor of New Orleans. "It has deep social implications. It has deep political implications."

According to an analysis of new census data, wealth gaps between whites and minorities have grown to their widest levels in a quarter-century, leaving whites on average with 20 times the net worth of blacks and 18 times that of Latinos.

In addition, the wealth of Latino households declined by 66 percent from 2005 to 2009 largely because of housing bust, the study showed. Black household wealth fell 53 percent.

The study comes as the National Urban League readies to begin its four-day convention, which this year will focus on jobs. Among the scheduled speakers are Microsoft founder Bill Gates and Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates.

The Urban League also is set to release its own study Wednesday on the erosion of the black middle class.

The civil rights group comes to Boston after last holdings its national convention in the city 35 years ago. During the group's last visit, Boston was erupting with busing riots and racial violence over court-ordered school desegregation. Boston's City Hall plaza was the site where black businessman Ted Landsmark was photographed during what appeared to be a beating by a white teen holding an American flag.

Even Boston Celtic great Bill Russell called the city a "flea market of racism," and blacks remember Boston as a city where its baseball team, the Boston Red Sox, was the last to integrate.

But today, Boston is a city where the majority of residents are people of color. Most students in its school district are Latino. And city officials recently announced that City Hall Plaza will be the site of a planned Bill Russell statue.

Massachusetts also has a black governor, Deval Patrick, who is entering his second term.

"Boston is definitely a different city than it was the last time the Urban League was here," Morial said. "That's a major reason why we are back."

Morial said Patrick personally called him around four years ago to invite the National Urban League to hold a future convention in Boston. Organizers say the convention already has 3,000 registrants.

But while some are praising Boston for evolving and bringing out the welcoming mat for the Urban League, others see it as an opportunity to highlight some of the city's persistent disparities.

For example, the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement has appealed to the Urban League to address the lack of high-ranking Latinos and blacks in the command staff of the Boston Police Department while the city continues to experience violence in largely minority neighborhoods. The law enforcement group has reached an impasse with Boston Mayor Tom Menino and Police Commissioner Edward Davis on ways to diversify the department's command staff.

"Police departments should reflect the ethnic makeup of the communities that they serve," said Morial, who has known Menino for years.

However, he said one of the goals of the convention is to strengthen the Eastern Massachusetts affiliate of the Urban League so it could address local concern like those posed by the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement.

Morial said that despite the myriad issues the Urban League can address, the group remains focused on jobs and job creation since it is the source of most inequality. "We hope that we can be seen that we have research, we have proposals and that we are an organization that goes beyond rhetoric," he said.

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