05-28-2024  3:49 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon 2024 Primary Results

Maxine Dexter, Janelle Bynum, Dan Reyfield and Elizabeth Steiner secure nominations; other races too soon to call.

AP Decision Notes: What to Expect in Oregon's Primaries

Oregon has multiple hotly contested primaries upcoming, as well as some that will set the stage for high-profile races in November. Oregon's 5th Congressional District is home to one of the top Democratic primaries in the country.

Iconic Skanner Building Will Become Healing Space as The Skanner Continues Online

New owner strives to keep spirit of business intact during renovations.

No Criminal Charges in Rare Liquor Probe at OLCC, State Report Says

The investigation examined whether employees of the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission improperly used their positions to obtain bottles of top-shelf bourbon for personal use.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Parks & Recreation’s Summer Free For All Returns for 2024

Parks Local Option Levy brings the city a full slate of free movies, concerts (including pop icon Sheila E), Free Lunch + Play, the...

GFO Library Open on Memorial Day

We are remaining open to give our patrons an opportunity to use the library on a day off from work. ...

Montavilla Jazz Festival Adds Concerts and Venues to Fall Festival

Festival features a three-day village-style celebration of local, world-class artistry with more than 30 concerts and events across 12...

Election Day Information in Multnomah County: Ballots Must Be Returned by 8 p.m. May 21

Today, May 21, 2024, is the last day to vote in the primary election. ...

PCC and Partners Break Ground on Affordable Housing

The new development, set to be a vibrant community hub, will feature 84 income-based apartments ...

Bill Walton, Hall of Fame player who became a star broadcaster, dies of cancer at 71

Bill Walton was never afraid to be himself. Larger than life, only in part because of his nearly 7-foot frame, Walton was a two-time NCAA champion at UCLA, a two-time champion in the NBA, a Basketball Hall of Fame inductee, an on-court icon in every sense of the word. And off the...

NBA says Hall of Famer Bill Walton dies at 71 prolonged fight with cancer

NEW YORK (AP) — NBA says Hall of Famer Bill Walton dies at 71 prolonged fight with cancer....

Duke tops Missouri 4-3 in 9 innings to win first super regional, qualify for first WCWS

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — D'Auna Jennings led off the top of the ninth inning with a home run to end a scoreless pitching duel between Cassidy Curd and Missouri's Laurin Krings and 10th-seeded Duke held on for a wild 4-3 victory over the seventh-seeded Tigers on Sunday in the finale of the...

Mizzou uses combined 2-hitter to beat Duke 3-1 to force decisive game in Columbia Super Regional

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Laurin Krings and two relievers combined on a two-hitter and seventh-seeded Missouri forced a deciding game in the Columbia Super Regional with a 3-1 win over Duke on Saturday. The Tigers (48-17) had three-straight singles in the fourth inning, with Abby Hay...

OPINION

The Skanner News May 2024 Primary Endorsements

Read The Skanner News endorsements and vote today. Candidates for mayor and city council will appear on the November general election ballot. ...

Nation’s Growing Racial and Gender Wealth Gaps Need Policy Reform

Never-married Black women have 8 cents in wealth for every dollar held by while males. ...

New White House Plan Could Reduce or Eliminate Accumulated Interest for 30 Million Student Loan Borrowers

Multiple recent announcements from the Biden administration offer new hope for the 43.2 million borrowers hoping to get relief from the onerous burden of a collective

Op-Ed: Why MAGA Policies Are Detrimental to Black Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE – MAGA proponents peddle baseless claims of widespread voter fraud to justify voter suppression tactics that disproportionately target Black voters. From restrictive voter ID laws to purging voter rolls to limiting early voting hours, these...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Armenians, Hmong and other groups feel US race and ethnicity categories don't represent them

The federal government recently reclassified race and ethnicity groups in an effort to better capture the diversity of the United States, but some groups feel the changes miss the mark. Hmong, Armenian, Black Arab and Brazilian communities in the U.S. say they are not represented...

South Africa's election could bring the biggest political shift since it became a democracy in 1994

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — South Africans will vote Wednesday to decide whether their country will take its most significant political step since the moment 30 years ago when it brought down apartheid and achieved democracy. This national election will not be as momentous as the...

National Spelling Bee reflects the economic success and cultural impact of immigrants from India

When Balu Natarajan became the first Indian American champion of the Scripps National Spelling Bee in 1985, a headline on an Associated Press article read, “Immigrants’ son wins National Spelling Bee,” with the first paragraph noting the champion “speaks his parents’ native Indian...

ENTERTAINMENT

Dabney Coleman, actor who specialized in curmudgeons, dies at 92

NEW YORK (AP) — Dabney Coleman, the mustachioed character actor who specialized in smarmy villains like the chauvinist boss in "9 to 5" and the nasty TV director in "Tootsie," has died. He was 92. Coleman died Thursday at his home in Santa Monica, his daughter, Quincy Coleman, said...

Book Review: 'Cujo' character returns as one of 12 stories in Stephen King’s ‘You Like It Darker'

In Stephen King’s world, “It” is a loaded word. It’s hard not to picture Pennywise the Clown haunting the sewers of Derry, Maine, of course, but in the horror writer’s newest collection of stories, “You Like It Darker,” “It” ranges from a suspicious stranger on a park bench, to an...

Book Review: 'Ascent to Power' studies how Harry Truman overcame lack of preparation in transition

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Harry Truman's ascension to the presidency after Franklin Roosevelt's death was a rocky one, and it came at a pivotal time in the nation's history. Once a senator who complained that the 32nd president treated him like “an office boy,” Truman left the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Hollywood movies rarely reflect climate change crisis. These researchers want to change that

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Aquaman might not mind if the oceans rise, but moviegoers might. That's one...

Still hurting from violence, Mexican priests and families hope for peace ahead of elections

CHIHUAHUA, México (AP) — José Portillo Gil, the gang leader known as “El Chueco” — the Crooked One —...

Belgium commits jumi billion to Ukraine as Zelenskyy continues his whistlestop European tour

BRUSSELS (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Tuesday picked up a second jumi billion promise of...

Russia will build Central Asia's first nuclear power plant in an agreement with Uzbekistan

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia and Uzbekistan signed an accord Monday for Moscow to build a small nuclear power plant in...

Donor fatigue persists as nations commit around .1 billion for conflict-hit Syrians

BEIRUT (AP) — International donors meeting in Brussels said Monday they will commit 7.5 billion euros (.1...

At least 13 killed in a stone quarry collapse in India’s northeast. 16 others remain missing

GUWAHATI, India (AP) — A stone quarry collapsed Tuesday in India’s northeast due to heavy rains triggered by a...

Russell Contreras Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) -- The widening wealth gap between whites and minorities has wiped out gains made over that last 30 years and could foreshadow even more inequality if something isn't done to address it, National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial told the Associated Press on Tuesday.

Speaking a day before the National Urban League begins its annual convention, Morial said new census data analyzed by the Pew Research Center shows that blacks and Latinos have especially been hit hard by the economic meltdown. He said the report is a "wake-up call" that those communities need more investments for long-term job creation.

"A paramount issue for this nation for the 21st century is to ensure the narrowing and closing of the racial wealth gap," said Morial, a former mayor of New Orleans. "It has deep social implications. It has deep political implications."

According to an analysis of new census data, wealth gaps between whites and minorities have grown to their widest levels in a quarter-century, leaving whites on average with 20 times the net worth of blacks and 18 times that of Latinos.

In addition, the wealth of Latino households declined by 66 percent from 2005 to 2009 largely because of housing bust, the study showed. Black household wealth fell 53 percent.

The study comes as the National Urban League readies to begin its four-day convention, which this year will focus on jobs. Among the scheduled speakers are Microsoft founder Bill Gates and Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates.

The Urban League also is set to release its own study Wednesday on the erosion of the black middle class.

The civil rights group comes to Boston after last holdings its national convention in the city 35 years ago. During the group's last visit, Boston was erupting with busing riots and racial violence over court-ordered school desegregation. Boston's City Hall plaza was the site where black businessman Ted Landsmark was photographed during what appeared to be a beating by a white teen holding an American flag.

Even Boston Celtic great Bill Russell called the city a "flea market of racism," and blacks remember Boston as a city where its baseball team, the Boston Red Sox, was the last to integrate.

But today, Boston is a city where the majority of residents are people of color. Most students in its school district are Latino. And city officials recently announced that City Hall Plaza will be the site of a planned Bill Russell statue.

Massachusetts also has a black governor, Deval Patrick, who is entering his second term.

"Boston is definitely a different city than it was the last time the Urban League was here," Morial said. "That's a major reason why we are back."

Morial said Patrick personally called him around four years ago to invite the National Urban League to hold a future convention in Boston. Organizers say the convention already has 3,000 registrants.

But while some are praising Boston for evolving and bringing out the welcoming mat for the Urban League, others see it as an opportunity to highlight some of the city's persistent disparities.

For example, the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement has appealed to the Urban League to address the lack of high-ranking Latinos and blacks in the command staff of the Boston Police Department while the city continues to experience violence in largely minority neighborhoods. The law enforcement group has reached an impasse with Boston Mayor Tom Menino and Police Commissioner Edward Davis on ways to diversify the department's command staff.

"Police departments should reflect the ethnic makeup of the communities that they serve," said Morial, who has known Menino for years.

However, he said one of the goals of the convention is to strengthen the Eastern Massachusetts affiliate of the Urban League so it could address local concern like those posed by the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement.

Morial said that despite the myriad issues the Urban League can address, the group remains focused on jobs and job creation since it is the source of most inequality. "We hope that we can be seen that we have research, we have proposals and that we are an organization that goes beyond rhetoric," he said.

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The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast