08-10-2022  9:36 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

White Woman Calls Police on Black Man Standing at His Home

“If you guys have a lease, I’d just like to see the lease,”

Oregon's Wildfire Risk Map Emerges as New Climate Flashpoint

A new map in Oregon that rated the wildfire risk of every tax lot in the state — labeling nearly 80,000 structures as high-risk — generated so much pushback from angry homeowners that officials abruptly retracted it

Seattle Ends COVID Hazard Pay for Grocery Store Workers

A policy passed in 2021 requiring grocery stores pay employees an additional per hour in hazard pay has just come to an end

Washington Voters Weigh in on Dozens of State Primary Races

Voters were deciding the top two candidates in races for the U.S. Senate, Congress and the secretary of state's office.

NEWS BRIEFS

Washington Ferries to Get $38 Million to Improve Services

Out of the 35 states and three territories receiving federal money for ferries, Washington will get the biggest allocation ...

Personal Information of Some in Jails Possibly Compromised

A statement from the county said names, dates of birth and photos — as well as medical information like diagnoses and treatments —...

Bicycle and Pedestrian Lane Reduction on Morrison Bridge Starts Next Week

The bicycle and pedestrian lanes will be reduced to seven feet to allow for painting crew and equipment. ...

King County Elections to Open Six Vote Centers for the Primary Election

Voters who need to register to vote, get a replacement ballot, or use an assistive device are encouraged to visit Vote Centers on...

Eugene Restaurant Owner Keeps All Tips Workers Earn, Uses Them to Pay Wages

The U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division found Ji Li, owner of Bao Bao House in Eugene, Oregon violated the Fair Labor...

Officials: high tide flooding more common as sea levels rise

BELLINGHAM, Wash. (AP) — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said high tide flooding has become more common as sea levels rise and is affecting residents of coastal towns and states. Floods that used to only occur during large storms now occur more regularly from...

Red Flag Warning issued for Western Washington state

SNOHOMISH, Wash. (AP) — A Red Flag Warning was issued for portions of western Washington on Wednesday due to the threat of thunderstorms amid dry conditions. The warning issued by the National Weather Service is in effect from 2 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Wednesday, KING5 reported. ...

OPINION

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

Improving Healthcare for Low-Income Americans Through Better Managed Care

Many should recognize that health equity – or ensuring that disadvantaged populations get customized approaches to care and better medical outcomes – is a top priority. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Pioneering art collection returns to Zimbabwe after 70 years

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — For the first time in his life, Gift Livingstone Sango, 65, saw a painting by his father depicting Jesus as a Black man. “My father used to draw Jesus as Black because God is for all of us. He is not a God of color,” said Sango. The...

Grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi grand jury has declined to indict the white woman whose accusation set off the lynching of Black teenager Emmett Till nearly 70 years ago, most likely closing the case that shocked a nation and galvanized the modern civil rights movement. After...

Missouri family says racism led to pool party cancellation

LEE'S SUMMIT, Mo. (AP) — A Black family says racism prompted officials at a suburban Kansas City water park to cancel a private pool party for their 17-year-old son's birthday during the weekend. Chris Evans said he signed a contract with Summit Waves Aquatic Facility in Lee's...

ENTERTAINMENT

David McCullough, Pulitzer-winning historian, dies at 89

NEW YORK (AP) — David McCullough, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author whose lovingly crafted narratives on subjects ranging from the Brooklyn Bridge to Presidents John Adams and Harry Truman made him among the most popular and influential historians of his time, has died. He was 89. ...

'P-Valley' explores Black strip club culture, gay acceptance

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When Katori Hall first pitched the idea to convert her popular play about Black strip club culture into the television series “P-Valley,” the Pulitzer Prize winner was either quickly rejected after meeting with networks or denied before she could fully explain the concept. ...

Nicki Minaj to get Video Vanguard Award at MTV Awards

NEW YORK (AP) — Nicki Minaj will receive the Video Vanguard Award at the MTV Awards later this month, joining such previous winning music luminaries as Madonna, Janet Jackson, LL Cool J, Jennifer Lopez and Missy Elliott. Minaj, who has won five MTV trophies for such hits as...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Afghan man charged in killings of Muslims in New Mexico

The ambush killings of four Muslim men in Albuquerque, New Mexico, shook the community but inspired a flood of...

Beaned Little League batter rises to console upset pitcher

WACO, Texas (AP) — A Little League batter rose from a beaning to console the upset pitcher in a dramatic scene...

Iranian operative charged in plot to murder John Bolton

WASHINGTON (AP) — An Iranian operative has been charged in a plot to murder former Trump administration national...

Austin pledges military training, support for Baltics

RIGA, Latvia (AP) — The U.S. will conduct more military exercises with Baltic nations such as Latvia, and look...

Wildfire in southwestern France: 6,000 people evacuated

PARIS (AP) — Firefighters were battling a wildfire in southwestern France on Wednesday in a region known for its...

Russian journalist detained, charged over war criticism

Russian authorities on Wednesday detained a former state TV journalist who quit after making an on-air protest...

Lisa Loving of The Skanner News

The U.S. Department of Justice has closed its investigation into the Portland Police killing of Aaron Campbell on the grounds of insufficient evidence.

(Read The Skanner News previous reporting, US Department of Justice Confirms 'Pattern and Practices' Probe of Portland Police)

The Justice Department today announced it will not be filing federal criminal civil rights charges against the officers, and that officials from the department's Civil Rights Division, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon and the FBI have already met with Campbell's family on their decision

"Under the applicable federal criminal civil rights laws, prosecutors must establish, beyond a reasonable doubt, that a law enforcement officer willfully deprived an individual of a constitutional right, meaning with the deliberate and specific intent to do something the law forbids," said a statement from the DOJ released Tuesday afternoon. "Neither accident, mistake, fear, negligence nor bad judgment is sufficient to establish such a criminal violation," it said.

"After a careful review of the facts, a team of experienced federal prosecutors determined that the evidence was insufficient to prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the law enforcement personnel who fired at Campbell acted willfully, meaning with the deliberate and specific intent to do something the law forbids."

Community members in February of 2010 enlisted the help of lawmakers to convince the DOJ to take up the case of Campbell's shooting Jan. 29 of that year.

Unarmed and in a mental health crisis, Campbell was shot in the back by Officer Ronald Frashour with an AR-15 rifle as he surrendered to negotiators in a dark, rainy parking lot off Northeast Sandy Boulevard.

A Grand Jury that convened on the issue of police use of force in the Campbell case in February of 2010 found officers did not violate policies, but it also expressed outrage at the scene that led to Campbell's death and urged the city to rethink its rules on use of force.

In an almost unprecedented move, jury members pushed Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schrunk and Mayor Sam Adams to petition the court to reveal transcripts of its hearings. "Portland deserves better," jury members wrote in a statement. "Aaron Campbell deserved better."

Community organizations including the Urban League of Portland, the African American Alliance, the Albina Ministerial Alliance, as well as then-Police Commissioner Dan Saltzman, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden and Rep. Earl Blumenauer together called for a "pattern and practice" investigation by the Civil Rights Division that was eventually referred to the DOJ Special Litigation Section for review.

Frashour, who was fired last year for failing to observe bureau policy on use of force – but has been the subject of recent reinstatement hearings -- eventually racked up tens of thousands of dollars in legal settlements for other use of force incidents, including:

--$55,000 awarded in a federal lawsuit to Frank Waterhouse, tasered without warning by Frashour while videotaping a police search in 2006;

--$44,043.26 to settle a lawsuit from August 2008 when Frashour rammed into a Honda Civic as he was trying to stop a reckless driver who was driving a differently-colored Honda Civic.

Other unresolved lawsuits against Frashour include:

--A 2007 domestic dispute in which a married couple was arrested and Frashour pepper-sprayed the wife inside her house. Ultimately all charges were dropped against both husband and wife, who sued the city of Portland for arresting them without probable cause.

--A wrongful death lawsuit brought by the family of Aaron Campbell against the City of Portland which is still underway.


Joint Statement by Mayor Sam Adams and Police Chief Michael Reese on the DOJ Investigation
 
Today, following a yearlong inquiry, the United States Department of Justice announced that there is "insufficient evidence to pursue federal criminal civil rights charges against Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers" involved in the January 29, 2010 fatal shooting of Aaron Campbell. Shortly after the shooting occurred, then-Police Commissioner Dan Saltzman and Mayor Sam Adams urged Senator Ron Wyden to ask the United States Department of Justice (USDOJ) Civil Rights Division to conduct a full review of the incident and all aspects of the Portland Police Bureau.
"The fatal shooting of Aaron Campbell was tragic, and I appreciate the Justice Department taking a thorough look at the facts of this case," Mayor Sam Adams said. "Chief Mike Reese and the Portland Police Bureau and I have already taken action in the last year to learn from the Campbell case, and making necessary changes in police training and practices. We've sought to be decisive in addressing this issue."
"I want to thank the DOJ for their investigation into this officer-involved shooting. We can't undo the death of Aaron Campbell, but I believe we have taken significant steps to learn from it," Chief Michael Reese said. "In this case, I believe each Bureau member involved was attempting to do their best to resolve a complex situation. However, there were significant issues that were brought forth in the Bureau's internal reviews and those involved were held accountable."
Immediately following the Campbell incident, the Police Bureau began an in-depth investigation followed by a Grand Jury review. There was also an exhaustive internal review focusing on potential policy violations, officer performance and adherence to Bureau training. The case then went to the Use of Force Review Board, which is comprised of community members, peer members and command staff. Based on recommendations by the Use of Force Review Board, the Mayor and Chief approved appropriate discipline for the sergeants and officers involved in the incident, including termination and suspension for policy violations and performance. The entire investigative file, training analysis and letters of discipline were released to the public.
As a result of the incident and subsequent review, additional training was implemented including the selection and training of officers carrying AR-15 rifles. The Chief also ordered all of the Bureau's policies concerning less lethal tools to be reevaluated to ensure uniformity in each policy. In addition, ballistic shields were purchased and have been deployed allowing officers to approach down subjects in a more timely manner.
 

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events