05-05-2021  2:57 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

As Reparations Hit Roadblock, Oregon Lawmakers Look to U.S. Congress and Cities

Sen. Frederick pushed for eligible Black Oregonians to receive a lifetime annuity as remedy for slavery, systemic racism.

Landmark Gun Safety Bill Clears Final Vote

The Oregon Senate repassed Senate Bill 554 – approving modifications made in the House to add storage and safety requirements among the bill’s components.

Shooting Highlights Lack of Body Cams Among Portland Police

Two police officers raised their weapons while sheltering behind a tree in a Portland park. They yelled at a homeless man to put up his hands. Moments later, two shots rang out.

Oregon Lawmakers Vote to Expedite Emergency Shelter Process

On Monday, Oregon lawmakers passed a bill that will make it easier and quicker for communities to create emergency shelters and temporary housing.

NEWS BRIEFS

Burgerville Introduces a New Plant Based Ice Cream Sandwich

The Pacific Northwest chain is also offering free strawberry shakes to moms on Mother's Day ...

Oregon Community Foundation Awards $2.2 Million to Centro Cultural to Serve Low-Income Latino Families and Seasonal Workers

Oregon Community Foundation announced that Centro Cultural de Washington County has been selected to receive a Project Turnkey...

State of California Partners With Accomplished African-American Artist to Illustrate Importance of Wearing Masks to Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19

The goal of this project is to speak to and recognize the contributions and resilience of disproportionately impacted communities ...

Governor Proclaims May as Foster Care Month in Oregon

Resource families, formerly called foster families or foster parents in Oregon, ensure cultural and community connections for children...

PPB Seeks Public Input on Directives

The Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directive(s). ...

Oregon moves toward safe storage of guns; ban from Capitol

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would mandate safe storage of guns and ban them from the state Capitol. Republican lawmakers strenuously objected, saying they and others will be deprived of the ability to defend themselves. The bill, named for...

Shooting highlights lack of body cams among Portland police

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Two police officers raised their weapons while sheltering behind a tree in a Portland park. They yelled at a homeless man to put up his hands. Moments later, two shots rang out. The man collapsed onto the grassy field. A replica gun with an orange tip...

OPINION

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Trade Arron Rodgers

Give Aaron Rodgers a break, Green Bay. Just like Bart Starr & Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers has been a Hall of Fame quarterback for the Packers for 16 years. ...

Editorial From the Publisher - Council: Police Reform Needed Now

Through years of ceaseless protest, activists have tried to hold Portland Police to account. ...

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

George Floyd Should Still Be Here

Wade Henderson, interim president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, released the following statement in response to the jury’s conviction of Derek Chauvin ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

San Francisco women stabbed amid wave of attacks on Asians

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two elderly Asian women were stabbed without warning as they waited for a bus in downtown San Francisco — the latest in a series of attacks against Asian Americans nationwide since the start of the pandemic last year. A woman working at a flower stall...

Top US general urges greater racial diversity in military

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. military must widen opportunity and improve advancement for Black service members, who remain vastly underrepresented in some areas, including among Air Force pilots and in the most senior ranks, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Wednesday. ...

Lawsuit seeks Confederate statue's removal from courthouse

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — Civil rights advocates sued a Maryland county on Wednesday to seek the court-ordered removal of a Confederate monument from a courthouse lawn on the state's Eastern Shore, calling it a racist symbol of oppression. In their federal lawsuit, an NAACP...

ENTERTAINMENT

Billie Eilish, J Balvin, A$AP to play NY's Gov Ball festival

NEW YORK (AP) — Billie Eilish completed the third stop of her massive tour, and was just two days away from headlining Madison Square Garden, before she had to cancel the trek because of the coronavirus pandemic last year. Now she's returning to New York City as one of the...

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, to release 1st children's book

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, is releasing her first children’s book, one rooted in the relationship between Prince Harry and their son, Archie. Random House Children’s Books announced Tuesday that “The Bench” will be released June 8. ...

Comic strip artists band together for a silly and good cause

NEW YORK (AP) — Fans of newspaper comics will instantly notice something missing in many of the strips this Friday — pants. More than 25 cartoonists behind strips from “Blondie” to “Zippy the Pinhead” are celebrating the quirky holiday No Pants Day in a way that...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Shooting highlights lack of body cams among Portland police

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Two police officers raised their weapons while sheltering behind a tree in a Portland...

Liz Cheney clings to GOP post as Trump endorses replacement

WASHINGTON (AP) — No. 3 House Republican Liz Cheney was clinging to her post Wednesday as party leaders lined up...

Peloton recalls treadmills, halts sales, after a child dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Peloton is recalling about 125,000 of its treadmills less than a month after denying they were...

Main stage of Chinese rocket likely to plunge to Earth soon

BEIJING (AP) — The largest section of the rocket that launched the main module of China's first permanent space...

Rome jury convicts 2 US youths in slaying of police officer

ROME (AP) — A jury in Rome on Wednesday convicted two American friends in the 2019 slaying of a police officer...

COVID-19 overshadows independence in key Scottish election

EYEMOUTH, Scotland (AP) — James Cook was an enthusiastic supporter of Scottish independence, but now he’s not...

Albina Highway Covers
Ryan Nakashima AP Business Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs on Monday introduced more than just a cloud storage system for songs that fans buy legitimately through iTunes. He unveiled a system that might finally get music lovers to pay for the songs they got through less-than-proper means.

Aside from offering to freely distribute new and old iTunes purchases on all of a user's devices, the Apple impresario unveiled "iTunes Match," a $25-a-year service starting this fall that will scan users' devices and hard drives for music acquired in other ways, store it on distant computer servers and allow them to access it anywhere.

The service acknowledges a well-known fact - that most music on iPods, iPhones and iPads was ripped or swapped. Apple reached a deal that gives recording companies more than 70 percent of the new fees, addressing a dark secret that has crippled the music industry, and provides them with some economic payback.

Where Apple is able to identify and match songs from its 18 million-song database, it will transfer them into the user's iCloud, a storage area housed on servers, including those at a massive new data center in North Carolina.

"The chances are awfully good that we've got the songs in our store that you've ripped," Jobs said.

Where songs can't be identified - say of bootlegged concert recordings - users can manually upload them to the cloud and gain the same access.

Jobs called it "an industry-leading offer" compared with similar song-uploading storage services recently introduced by Amazon.com Inc. and Google Inc. The limit of "iTunes Match" is 25,000 songs, and the service will update lesser-quality song files to iTunes standards. ITunes purchases do not count against the limit.

Industry observers said the new service could translate into big bucks for both Apple and the recording companies.

Apple has about 225 million credit card-backed accounts on iTunes. If only 10 percent signed up for the convenience of accessing music they hadn't bought there, it could turn into more than $500 million a year in new revenue, said Jeff Price, CEO of TuneCore Inc., a company that helps independent artists sell their music on iTunes and other digital music outlets.

The best thing is that consumers get the sense that they're paying for convenience, not for things they already own, he said.

"It allows for revenue to be made off of pirated music in a way that consumers don't feel that's what they're paying for, and that's what I find fascinating about it," Price said.

Both the free and the paid cloud services address a pressing need - to access music, documents and photos that are now stored on various devices - without the need for connecting wires to a computer. Such syncing has been a headache for music fans.

"If you're a music fan, the greater the fan, the greater the frustration," said Eric Garland, the CEO of online media measurement company Big Champagne LLC.

Garland said that he expected "iTunes Match" would allow consumers to stream music to themselves if they have any Internet connection by the time it is released in the fall, a capability not mentioned in Monday's presentation.

Such streaming capabilities are part of the cloud services recently launched by both Amazon and Google. But those technology giants failed to come to an agreement with the recording labels.

Therefore, both of those services require users to upload music from their computer before playback, which can take hours depending on the size of one's library. Apple said it can match users' songs in the cloud in "just minutes."

Amazon and Google felt they didn't need that ability to launch their services, but they may soon find they do if Apple's service takes off.

Recording companies Warner Music Group Corp., Vivendi SA's Universal Music Group, EMI Group Ltd. and Sony Corp.'s Sony Music Entertainment are hoping their deal with Apple will bring those holdouts back to the table, said Eric Custer, a music and entertainment lawyer with Manatt, Phelps & Phillips in Los Angeles.

"It may light a fire under them to now try and conclude those deals," he said.

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Associated Press Writers Michael Liedtke and Marcus Wohlsen in San Francisco and Barbara Ortutay in New York contributed to this report.

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