04-21-2021  4:50 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Housing Advocates Push to Free Public Funds for Housing from ‘Discriminatory,’ ‘Antiquated’ State System

Currently, organizations must apply for funds through one of 18 regional agencies. Even state officials decry the system.

Blumenauer Introduces Legislation to Reinstate Superfund Taxes; End 25-Year Polluter Tax Holiday That Slowed Toxic Cleanup

President Biden identified restoring payments from polluters into the Superfund Trust Fund as a top priority as part of a major infrastructure plan.

Lents Park Scene of Police Shooting During Protests

Amid protests across Portland against police brutality a man was shot and killed in Lents Park after reports he had a gun. Some protesters described by Mayor Ted Wheeler as a small group of "violent agitators" lit dumpster fires at the ICE and Multnomah County Sheriff's buildings and smashed windows downtown including at the Nike store building and the Oregon History Centre

Lawsuit Describes Night of Fear for Wall of Moms Protester

In the lawsuit filed in federal court in Portland, Jennifer Kristiansen also accused a federal agent of groping her as he trapped her against a wall, leading her to fear she would be raped

NEWS BRIEFS

Five Lucky Oregonians Won a Second Chance at Holiday Winnings

Prizes ranged from jumi,500 to 0,000 depending on the value of the original Scratch-it top prize. ...

Girls on the Run of Portland Metro Awarded Campbell Soup Foundation COVID-19 Recovery Grant

Supporting the Campbell Soup Foundation’s focus on encouraging healthy living, Girls on the Run inspires girls to be joyful,...

Ageless Awards Honor Older Oregonians Who Redefine Age

Four Oregonians will be honored for their inspiring contributions later in life during a free, public, virtual celebration on April...

Legislators Introduce Bill to Create a Statue of Shirley Chisholm Inside the U.S Capitol

Rep. Yvette D. Clark introduced the bill as part of a larger effort to increase the representation of Black women within the Capitol. ...

Grants Available For Portland Area Black-Led and Serving Organizations

To become a more equitable and just organization, the Providence Portland Service Area Advisory Council seeks to fund community...

Guilty verdicts in Floyd's death bring joy — and wariness

London Williams stood in Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C., moments before the verdict was read in George Floyd's murder trial Tuesday, wondering how he would cope if the white police officer who killed the Black man was acquitted. “I feel very nervous. It’s...

Fire, ammonia release at creamery prompts evacuations

MCMINNVILLE, Ore. (AP) — A fire and related ammonia in the air at the Organic Valley Creamery in McMinnville Tuesday prompted an evacuation order for everyone within a half mile of the business. McMinnville Police announced the evacuation at about 2:30 p.m. Tuesday because of...

OPINION

Letter to the Editor: Portland Police Union Response to Chauvin Trial Verdict

The Portland Police Association union says in the coming days, their officers will work hard to preserve our community’s right to peacefully protest ...

Portland Commissioners Release Statement on Recent Protests

The murder of Daunte Wright is a reminder that the call for justice for Black lives, accountability, and systemic community safety reform never stops. ...

An Open Letter To the Community From Multnomah County Sheriff Mike Reese

Sheriff Reese outlines Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office's strategic plan and goals to reinforce equity now and in the future. ...

Candace Avalos On The Right Track With Public Housing

Our unhoused neighbors deserve a safe and clean place to sleep ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Biden to America after Floyd verdict: 'We can't stop here'

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said the conviction of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd “can be a giant step forward” for the nation in the fight against systemic racism. But he declared that "it's not enough.” Biden...

'Sliver of hope.' Relief, caution as America absorbs verdict

NEW YORK (AP) — When the verdicts came in — guilty, guilty and guilty — Lucia Edmonds let out the breath she hadn't even realized she'd been holding. The relief that the 91-year-old Black woman felt flooding over her when white former Minneapolis police Officer Derek...

Floyd verdict gives hope, if only fleeting, to Black America

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Relief, even if fleeting and momentary, is a feeling that Black Americans have rarely known in America: From slavery to Jim Crow segregation to enduring punishments for living while Black, a breath of fresh air untainted by oppression has long been hard to come by. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Chicken Soup for the Soul will soon be served to kids

NEW YORK (AP) — The multimillion-selling Chicken Soup for the Soul franchise is reaching for a younger demographic. Chicken Soup for the Soul has reached a partnership with the children's publisher Charlesbridge for two new series of books, the two publishers announced...

Rejected Broadway posters on sale to help theater community

NEW YORK (AP) — Letting the world see your failures is usually something most people try to avoid. Not for theatrical poster designer Frank Verlizzo — he hopes you'll put his on your wall. Verlizzo is selling prints of his rejected posters for such shows as “Cabaret,”...

Webby Award nominations for LeBron, Corden and Garner

NEW YORK (AP) — An eclectic group of people — including LeBron James, James Corden, Jennifer Garner and Sir David Attenborough — have nabbed nominations for this year's Webby Awards, recognizing the best internet content and creators. The International Academy of Digital...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Oscar predictions: Can anything beat 'Nomadland'?

Ahead of Sunday’s 93rd Academy Awards, Associated Press Film Writers Jake Coyle and Lindsey Bahr share their...

'No place for you': Indian hospitals buckle amid virus surge

NEW DELHI (AP) — Seema Gandotra, sick with the coronavirus, gasped for breath in an ambulance for 10 hours as it...

Seoul court rejects sexual slavery claim against Tokyo

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean court on Wednesday rejected a claim by victims of Japanese wartime...

Rebels vow to take capital after Chadian president killed

N'DJAMENA, Chad (AP) — Chad’s president of three decades died of wounds suffered during a visit to front-line...

China's Xi to participate in Biden's climate summit

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping will take part in President Joe Biden’s climate summit this week,...

The Latest: Pakistan counts more deaths in latest virus wave

ISLAMABAD — Pakistani authorities on Wednesday reported 148 deaths from COVID-19, one of the country's highest...

Albina Highway Covers
Adrian Peterson and wife
Dave Campbell, AP Pro Football Writer

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson leaves the courthouse with his wife Ashley Brown Peterson Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, in Conroe, Texas. Adrian Peterson avoided jail time on Tuesday in a plea agreement reached with prosecutors to resolve his child abuse case. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — If Adrian Peterson is allowed to return to the Minnesota Vikings this season, the reunion probably won't happen swiftly.

The NFL formally began a review of the star running back's case for potential punishment under the league's personal conduct policy, informing Peterson on Thursday that his status on paid leave from the Vikings will not change until completion of the process.

"The NFL has requested that Peterson submit relevant information regarding his case and meet with designated experts who will make recommendations for the commissioner's consideration," spokesman Brian McCarthy said. "Peterson also will have the opportunity to have a hearing prior to the issuance of any discipline."

Peterson pleaded no contest in Texas on Tuesday to misdemeanor reckless assault, down from a felony charge of child abuse for disciplining his 4-year-old son with a wooden switch. He received what's essentially two years of probation, plus a $4,000 fine and requirement to complete parenting classes and 80 hours of community service.

"Adrian wants to get on with his life and have his relationship with his son and get back to playing football," Peterson's attorney, Rusty Hardin, said after the plea agreement was reached to avoid a trial or any jail time for the 29-year-old.

Just how fast Peterson gets back to playing football is a complicated and potentially contentious matter.

A few hours after the NFL released its update, the NFL Players Association issued a statement demanding efficiency and consistency. Those traits have often been missing from the disciplinary process.

"Our union worked with the NFL, the Minnesota Vikings and Adrian's representatives on a mutual agreement pending the adjudication of his legal case. Now that his legal matter is resolved, we believe it is Adrian's right to be treated in a manner that is consistent with similar cases under our collective bargaining agreement. We will pursue any and all remedies if those rights are breached," the NFLPA said.

The Vikings (4-5) are in their bye week, scheduled to reconvene for practice Monday. They play next at Chicago on Nov. 16.

With only seven games left on the schedule, the timeline is tight for a return. Commissioner Roger Goodell was excoriated for his initial leniency in the caught-on-camera knockout punch Baltimore running back Ray Rice threw at his now-wife. The league boss will be under intense scrutiny for how he handles any punishment for Peterson.

Weeks after handing Rice a two-game suspension, Goodell announced in August he was toughening the league's policy on domestic violence that now calls for a six-game suspension without pay for a first domestic violence offense.

That's not a cut-and-dry guideline in this case with Peterson, though, because he has maintained he intended no harm in seeking to discipline his son the way he was as a child growing up in Texas. His plea was not an admission of guilt, and the felony was reduced to a misdemeanor.

On the other hand, there's the firestorm to consider when the Vikings first declared on Sept. 15 that Peterson, after sitting out the home opener the day before, would remain with the team to give him his due process in the legal system.

The boy suffered cuts, marks and bruising to his thighs, back and one of his testicles, according to court records, and backlash from the public was strong. One major Vikings sponsor suspended its partnership, other corporations expressed concerns to the team and the league, and Peterson was dropped as an endorser of several brands.

The Vikings then reversed course about 36 hours later, announcing that Goodell agreed to issue his special roster exemption. Peterson continued to draw his weekly in-season salary of more than $690,000, and the team was sheltered from the proverbial pitchforks that came out after their initial decision.

Peterson's admission that he smoked marijuana prior to an October court appearance is unlikely to weigh into the discipline. The league has a separate policy on substance abuse, which was revised in September and does not call for a four-game suspension until a fourth offense. Prior violations put a player in referral to the program, followed by a two-game fine and a four-game fine.

The Vikings have been quiet since Peterson's plea agreement, stating only that they will speak about his situation "at the appropriate time."

Also on Thursday, Nike confirmed it has severed its relationship with Peterson. His contract with the shoe giant had been suspended in September.

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AP NFL websites: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

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