05-08-2021  12:43 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Extends COVID Workplace Mask Rule Indefinitely

State officials say the rule, which garnered thousands of public comments, will be in place until it is “no longer necessary to address the effects of the pandemic in the workplace.”

As Reparations Hit Roadblock, Oregon Lawmakers Look to U.S. Congress and Cities

Sen. Frederick pushed for eligible Black Oregonians to receive a lifetime annuity as remedy for slavery, systemic racism.

Landmark Gun Safety Bill Clears Final Vote

The Oregon Senate repassed Senate Bill 554 – approving modifications made in the House to add storage and safety requirements among the bill’s components.

Shooting Highlights Lack of Body Cams Among Portland Police

Two police officers raised their weapons while sheltering behind a tree in a Portland park. They yelled at a homeless man to put up his hands. Moments later, two shots rang out.

NEWS BRIEFS

Street Gallery: Crossing the Redline

Street Gallery, invites the public to an intergenerational art exhibit: “Crossing the Redline” ...

Unemployment Fix Passes Oregon Senate, Helps Get More Oregonians Back to Work

Many Oregon employers believe this policy will help support their rapidly changing workforce needs, COVID-19 regulations, and worker...

Concrete Wall Around Seattle Police Precinct Comes Down

The city decided to take the wall down after hearing from the community ...

Peloton Recalls Treadmills, Halts Sales, After a Child Dies

Peloton is recalling about 125,000 of its treadmills less than a month after denying they were dangerous and saying it would not pull...

Free Online Classes Promote Sustainable Living

Clark County’s Master Composter Recycler program is offering a series of free sustainable living webinars this spring. ...

Southern resident orca pod in best condition in decade

SEATTLE (AP) — She was a mother who happened to be an orca, whose plight resonated around the world as she clung to her dead calf, refusing to let it go. Mother orca Tahlequah, J35, brought front and center the extinction crisis threatening the southern resident killer whales...

Man sentenced to 20 years for shooting man to death

BOISE, Idaho. (AP) — A Fruitland, Idaho man was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Friday in the shooting death of a man in Ontario, Oregon. According to court documents, Jaime Anthony Escobedo fatally shot 38-year-old Larry Fuentes, Jr. of Portland, Oregon in a restaurant...

OPINION

OP-ED: The Supreme Court Can Protect Black Lives by Ending Qualified Immunity

The three officers responsible for the murder of Breonna Taylor are not the first to walk free after killing an unarmed Black person, and unfortunately, especially if things continue as they are, they will not be the last. ...

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Trade Arron Rodgers

Give Aaron Rodgers a break, Green Bay. Just like Bart Starr & Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers has been a Hall of Fame quarterback for the Packers for 16 years. ...

Editorial From the Publisher - Council: Police Reform Needed Now

Through years of ceaseless protest, activists have tried to hold Portland Police to account. ...

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Massachusetts mom wants outside review of Black teen's death

HOPKINTON, Mass. (AP) — Family members and activists are demanding answers in the death of a Black teen whose body was found near her home in a Boston suburb last month. Authorities said they have not determined how 16-year-old Mikayla Miller died. Her body was found on April...

With civil rights charges, Justice Dept. signals priorities

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is sending a strong message about its priorities these days. In just over the past two weeks, it has opened investigations of police in Louisville, Kentucky, and Minneapolis. Federal prosecutors have charged four former Minneapolis...

Maryland governor pardoning 34 victims of racial lynching

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan will posthumously pardon 34 victims of racial lynching in the state who were denied legal due process in the allegations against them between 1854 and 1933, a spokesman for Hogan said Saturday. Michael Ricci, Hogan's spokesman,...

ENTERTAINMENT

In the shadow of COVID-19, a toll on entertainment workers

NEW YORK (AP) — Like so many, the pandemic upended life for actor and dancer Rena Riffel. The Los Angeles-based performer needed help with rent, utilities and counselling when jobs suddenly dried up. “Being an artist, we are already very fragile with our finances," she...

David Oyelowo fulfills new directing passion in 'Water Man'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — While starring in films like “Selma” and “Lee Daniels' The Butler,” actor David Oyelowo discovered a new passion: directing. Oyelowo was inspired to step behind-the-camera after learning different nuances of the craft from respected directors like...

Review: Jason Statham, Guy Ritchie reunite and have a blast

Jason Statham says very, very little in his new film. The English actor must have only need to memorize about three pages of dialogue. But, as always, he's very expressive with his hands. And the guns in them. “You ain’t much for talking, are you, Mary Poppins?” he is...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

South Africa's royal scandal: New Zulu king's claim disputed

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — A new Zulu king was named in South Africa amid scenes of chaos after members of...

Tawny Kitaen, star of '80s rock music videos, dies at 59

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Tawny Kitaen, the sultry red-haired actress who appeared in rock music videos...

With civil rights charges, Justice Dept. signals priorities

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is sending a strong message about its priorities these days. ...

Unsure vaccine waiver will help, some leaders urge exports

GENEVA (AP) — European leaders voiced increasing skepticism Friday that a U.S. proposal to lift patent...

WHO panel OKs emergency use of China's Sinopharm vaccine

GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization gave emergency use authorization Friday to a COVID-19 vaccine...

UK to ease holiday travel ban yet keeps most quarantines

LONDON (AP) — Britain announced a “first tentative step” Friday toward resuming international travel, saying...

Three pieces of Benin Bronzes are displayed at Museum for Art and Crafts in Hamburg, Germany, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. Germany is returning hundreds of artifacts known as Benin Bronzes that were mostly looted from western Africa by a British colonial expedition and subsequently sold to collections around the world, including German museums. (Daniel Bockwoldt/dpa via AP)
FRANK JORDANS Associated Press

BERLIN (AP) — Germany is returning hundreds of artifacts known as the Benin Bronzes that were mostly looted from West Africa by a British colonial expedition and subsequently sold to collections around the world, including German museums, authorities said Friday.

Foreign Minister Heiko Maas welcomed a deal reached with museums and authorities in Nigeria to work on a restitution plan for a substantial number of artifacts, calling it a “turning point in dealing with our colonial history.”

Germany’s minister for culture, Monika Gruetters, said the Benin Bronzes were a key test for the way the country deals with its colonial past.

“We are confronting our historic and moral responsibility,” she said.

Gruetters said the goal is to contribute to “understanding and reconciliation” with the descendants of those whose cultural treasures were stolen in colonial times. The first returns are planned for next year, she said.

A historian welcomed the plans, but said they don't go far enough.

“Sadly, there is neither a precise time plan nor an unconditional commitment to restitute all looted artifacts,” said Juergen Zimmerer, professor of global history at the University of Hamburg.

He also noted it's not yet clear how many objects will be returned, or whether there will be any recognition of the efforts by civil society groups that had called for the restitution.

A British colonial expedition looted vast numbers of treasures from the royal palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, including numerous bas-reliefs and sculptures.

While hundreds of artifacts ended up in the British Museum, hundreds were also sold to other collections such as the Ethnological Museum in Berlin, which has one of the world's largest collection of historical objects from the Kingdom of Benin, estimated to include about 530 items, including 440 bronzes.

The British Museum doesn't currently have plans to return parts of its collection.

“The devastation and plunder wreaked upon Benin City during the British military expedition in 1897 is fully acknowledged,” the British Museum said in a statement, adding that the circumstances around the acquisition of Benin objects is explained in gallery panels and on its website.

“We believe the strength of the British Museum collection resides in its breadth and depth, allowing millions of visitors an understanding of the cultures of the world and how they interconnect over time – whether through trade, migration, conquest or peaceful exchange,” it said.

But Zimmerer, who has done extensive historical research on the Benin Bronzes, said the decision by Germany would likely affect the wider debate about how institutions in former colonial countries should handle such artifacts.

“The pressure will grow, because the British position of simply not addressing the issue of restitution is no longer sustainable,” he said.

 

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