07-29-2021  11:33 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Unemployed Oregonians to Lose Pandemic Benefits in September

The state will stop paying the 0 weekly unemployment bonus after Labor Day

Statue of Black hero on Lewis & Clark trip toppled in Oregon

A statue in Portland, Oregon, commemorating York, an enslaved Black member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, has been toppled and damaged

Cannabis Chemical Delta-8 Gains Fans, Scrutiny

A chemical cousin of pot’s main intoxicating ingredient has rocketed to popularity over the last year. The cannabis industry and state governments are scrambling to reckon with it amid debate over whether it’s legal.

Report: SPD Stops Black People, Native Americans More

A newly-released report shows Seattle police officers continue to stop and use force against Black people far more often than white people.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Bars Camping in Forested Areas During Fire Season

The move aims to protect protect individuals experiencing homelessness and people in nearby homes from potentially deadly wildfires ...

OSF Presents Free Virtual Reading of Emilia

The event streams live on Wednesday, July 28 at 5:30 p.m. ...

Summer Bike Events to be Held at El Centro Milagro

This summer the streets around Milagro will host a cycle of fun activities. ...

SPLC Urges Department of Education to Prevent Racial Disparities and Discrimination in School Discipline

Research shows that Black students receive more severe disciplinary outcomes for the same behaviors as white students ...

Contractor Selected for Two-Year Morrison Bridge Painting Project

This will be the first time the Morrison Bridge river spans have been painted since the bridge opened 63 years ago in 1958. ...

Judge allows Nevada tribes to join fight over lithium mine

RENO, Nev. (AP) — A judge has cleared the way for two tribes to join an ongoing legal battle over plans to build a Nevada mine at the largest known U.S. deposit of lithium and seek a temporary ban on digging for an archaeological survey they say would desecrate sacred tribal lands near the Oregon...

COVID-19 surge straining Eastern Oregon hospitals

PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) — More than half the patients hospitalized as of Tuesday at CHI St. Anthony Hospital in Pendleton, Oregon, have tested positive for COVID-19, officials said. The hospitalizations come as Umatilla County reports about 8% of the state’s total cases over...

Drinkwitz, Pittman back for Southeastern Conference encores

HOOVER, Ala. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas both had some encouraging signs, if not great records, in their first seasons under new coaches. Now, the Tigers’ Eliah Drinkwitz and Razorbacks’ Sam Pittman are among four second-year Southeastern Conference coaches trying to...

OPINION

Services Available for Victims and Survivors of Community Violence in Multnomah County

The number of incidents of community violence — domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, person-to-person violence and gun violence — is devastating ...

Black America Needs a ‘New Normal’: Equitable Credit Access to Build Wealth

The rippling effects of a massive economic downturn has caused the nation to lose 9.5 million jobs - more losses than even those of the Great Recession ...

The President Needs to Pull Out All Stops

Majority Whip Clyburn, Democratic leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, made the observation that the filibuster currently being used in the U.S. Senate to block the Voting Rights Bill as well as the George Floyd Bill, is a matter of tradition and not...

NAACP Vancouver Letter to the Community: Police Accountability

NAACP Vancouver reacts to the descision in the case of Jonah Donald, a Black man shot and killed by a Clark County deputy ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New Yorkers say they've been ignored in stop-and-frisk fight

NEW YORK (AP) — Eight years after a judge ruled New York City police violated the constitution by stopping, questioning and frisking mostly Black and Hispanic people on the street en masse, people in communities most affected by such tactics say they've been shut out of the legal process to end...

Ex-police chief who rescued baby pleads guilty to assault

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A former suburban Kansas City police chief who helped rescue a baby from an icy pond and later assaulted the man accused of trying to kill the infant has pleaded guilty in the case. Greg Hallgrimson, 51, pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday, the...

Violent arrest in Colorado reignites anger over policing

AURORA, Colo. (AP) — A video showing a police officer pistol-whipping and choking a Black man during an arrest in a Denver suburb has reignited anger over policing in the community, with activists decrying what they say is just the latest example of the mistreatment of people of color. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: In 'Stillwater,' a red state hero roams chic France

Early on in “Stillwater,” a gruff oil rig worker from Oklahoma is asked what he's doing in the French port city of Marseille. “Visiting my daughter,” he replies. That's only sort of right, it turns out. He left some stuff out. But truth itself gets more than a little...

Review: In 'The Suicide Squad,' an anti-Captain America romp

One little article separates James Gunn’s “The Suicide Squad” from David Ayer’s “Suicide Squad.” But, oh, what a difference a word makes. Just five years after the trainwreck that prompted Warner Bros. to retool its DC Comics universe, James Gunn’s nearly wholesale...

Danticat, Groff among contributors to book 'Small Odysseys'

NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Cunningham, Edwidge Danticat and Carmen Maria Machado are among the prize-winning authors contributing stories to a collection co-sponsored by Manhattan's Symphony Space performing arts center and its nationally aired “Selected Shorts” program. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

In Robinhood's stock debut, a tumble and then sharp swings

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood made its own leap into the stock market Thursday, the one it helped reshape by...

'Trying to survive': Wells dry up amid Oregon water woes

MALIN, Ore. (AP) — Judy and Jim Shanks know the exact date their home’s well went dry — June 24. ...

AP PHOTOS: Tears of victory, defeat for Tokyo Olympians

An equestrian hugging his horse. A surfer slumped over his board. A judoka raising her fists in jubilation while...

AstraZeneca to seek US approval of COVID vaccine in 2nd half

LONDON (AP) — AstraZeneca said Thursday that it intends to seek U.S. approval for its COVID-19 vaccine later...

Nightmares, panic attacks: Belgian flood survivors struggle

TROOZ, Belgium (AP) — Visions of cars being swept away in a raging current keep coming back to trouble Eric...

Inquiry into Malta journalist's slaying blames state

VALLETTA, Malta (AP) — An independent inquiry into the murder of investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia...

By The Skanner News

From the author of "The Covenant with Black America" comes a searing memoir of poverty, ambition, pain and atonement. "In What I Know For Sure" (Doubleday, $23.95), celebrated talk-show host Tavis Smiley describes growing up in an all-White rural community in Indiana and the impact it had on his life.
In many ways, his has been a life of overcoming. Smiley grew up in a family of 13 in a trailer, where some years he had to forego a new pair of shoes to replace the ones he was outgrowing. He was one of the only African Americans in his high school class, and, raised as a Pentecostal, he never dated, drank or watched a movie until he attended college. Moreover, he had to find a way to survive the harsh discipline and punishment he sometimes received at home — hospitalized after being beaten by his father, he later fully reconnected with his parents.
Although he had such tough beginnings, Smiley possessed a drive to make something of himself and his life. His speaking ability made him an Indiana State oratorical champion. He later went on to use his passion and speaking talent to become a celebrated proponent of the underdog and then a broadcast star, where he found he could shape public discourse on the concerns of the day.
Despite the obstacles he faced, Smiley relied on his faith and the inspirational teachings of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and others to continue his pursuit of excellence. Whenever he met failure he channeled his negative feelings into positive energy. His difficult early relationship with his parents, tainted by his childhood beating, only drove him to tackle new challenges. Whether it was as class president in high school, a Kappa Alpha Psi at Indiana University or as an outspoken intern in Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley's office, Smiley strove to prove himself and the world that he could make a difference.
Smiley's hardships and the tough love of his parents transformed him from a small-town boy to a nationally recognized media figure and activist. These are some of the life lessons he shares in "What I Know For Sure":
• Embrace your talents
• Turn your fear into energy
• View yourself as a winner, and you will become a winner
• See beyond present pain and look to God for direction
• No one in life gets ahead without the help of others
Upon turning 40 and midway through his career, Smiley donated $1 million to Texas Southern University's communications school to provide scholarships for aspiring Black journalists. In 2005 and 2006 the Tavis Smiley talk show on PBS was recognized for its outstanding achievements with the prestigious National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Image Award.
"What I Know For Sure" is an honest self portrait of one of America's most popular media figures.

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