07-23-2017  1:55 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Augustana Lutheran Church Hosts Summer in the City Aug. 6

Free event includes BBQ, book sale, children’s games, music ...

Health Officials Warn of Spike in Heroin Overdoses

Emergency providers urge use of nalaxone, which is available without a prescription ...

Students Reach New Heights

Two rising sophomores attend aviation camp in Vancouver, Wash. ...

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

cannabis plant

 SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The future is in doubt for a bill aimed at cutting off the flow of medical marijuana to the black market after an Oregon legislative committee overseeing legal marijuana reached an impasse late Monday.

SB 844 creates a variety of new restrictions and regulations for the medical marijuana community, which lawmakers see as a necessary step to ensure the recreational program can succeed without drawing objections from federal authorities.

The Joint Committee on Implementing Measure 91 crafted a lengthy set of new restrictions for the medicinal program. But lawmakers could not agree on one: The process for local governments to ban medical marijuana dispensaries or other pot facilities within their boundaries.

"We are almost there. But we have a legitimate impasse here, with good people on both sides," said Sen. Ginny Burdick, a Portland Democrat who serves as the committee's co-chair. "So while that is regrettable, it's not surprising on an issue this complicated."

It will now fall to legislative leaders to figure out whether to revive the bill and how, Burdick said.

The bill would have kept regulation of medical marijuana separate from recreational marijuana. After lengthy negotiations, lawmakers generally agreed on a variety of new rules for the medical program. They include limits on the number of plants at a single grow site, an inventory tracking and reporting system, inspection requirements and an Oregon residency mandate.

The issue of local control was insurmountable, however. Some Democrats are adamantly opposed to local governments banning medical marijuana facilities, saying sick people who use marijuana need to have access to the drug.

"I have a huge amount of heartburn over the idea that medicine would be voted out of a community," said Rep. Peter Buckley, an Ashland Democrat.

Buckley and other critics of local bans eventually agreed to allow them if they were subject to an automatic vote of the people. But that was too much to ask for other lawmakers, who preferred that opponents of a ban gather signatures from registered voters to refer it to the ballot, as they would have to do to challenge any other local ordinance.

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Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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