01-20-2018  9:23 am      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Remembering the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike

Julianne Malveaux on the Memphis strike and how the dignity of today's workers continues to be assailed ...

Letter to the Editor: KNA Objects to Dr. Martens Billboards

A letter from the King Neighborhood Association ...

Black Students Hit Hard by For-Profit College Debt

Women and Blacks suffer disparate impacts, particularly at for-profit institutions, where they are disproportionately enrolled in most...

A New Year, a New Vision

North Portland Library will dedicate a display panel in the upstairs meeting room to visual artifacts contributed by the community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Marilynn Marchione AP Medical Writer



Dr. Mehmet Oz

The federal Food and Drug Administration and a leading doctor are disputing suggestions by television show host Dr. Mehmet Oz that trace amounts of arsenic in many apple juice products pose a health concern.

Oz said on "The Dr. Oz. Show" Wednesday that testing by a New Jersey lab has found what he implied are concerning levels of arsenic in many juices.

However, the FDA says the lab methods were not appropriate and that its own tests show much lower arsenic levels. The agency warned the show's producers in advance that their testing was misleading.

Dr. Richard Besser, former acting head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also scolded Oz Thursday on ABC's "Good Morning America" show for scaring consumers with what Besser called an "extremely irresponsible" report, like "yelling `Fire!' in a movie theater."

The issue: arsenic is naturally present in water, air, food, and soil in organic and inorganic forms, according to the FDA. "Organic arsenic is essentially harmless," and passes through the body quickly, the agency says. Inorganic arsenic is the type found in pesticides and at high levels or over a long period, can cause concern.

The testing "The Dr. Oz Show" did was for total arsenic, and the FDA even disputes those levels. The agency's own tests found lower total arsenic from one of the same juice batches the show's lab tested.

Tim Sullivan, a spokesman for Oz's show, sent an email saying: "We don't think the show is irresponsible. We think the public has a right to know what's in their foods."

Sullivan said Oz does not agree that organic arsenic is as safe as authorities believe, and that the show will do further tests to distinguish organic from inorganic arsenic in juice samples.

"The position of the show is that the total arsenic needs to be lower," he said. "We did the tests. We stand by the results and we think the standards should be different."

---

AP television writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

---

Online:

FDA: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm271394.htm

and http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm271746.htm

"The Dr. Oz Show": http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/arsenic-apple-juice

Besser-Oz faceoff: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm271394.htm

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events