12-18-2017  4:38 am      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

Exhibit Explores the Legacy of Portland Bird Watchers

Dedicated bird watchers catapult a conservationist movement ...

Special Call for Stories about the Spanish Flu

Genealogical Forum of Oregon seeks stories from the public about one of history's most lethal outbreaks ...

Joint Office of Homeless Services Announces Severe Weather Strategy

Those seeking shelter should call 211 or visit 211.org. Neighbors needed to volunteer, donate cold-weather apparel ...

Q&A with Facebook's Global Director of Diversity Maxine Williams

A conversation on diversity and the tech industry ...

City Announces Laura John as Tribal Liason

Laura John brings an extensive background in tribal advocacy and community engagement to the city of Portland ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Don’t Delay, Sign-up for Affordable Healthcare Today

The deadline to enroll or modify healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act is December 15. ...

The Skanner Editorial: Alabama Voters Must Reject Moore

Allegations of predatory behavior are troubling – and so is his resume ...

Payday Lenders Continue Attack on Consumer Protections

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes that two bills that favor predatory lenders has received bipartisan...

Hundreds Rallied for Meek Mill, but What About the Rest?

Lynette Monroe, a guest columnist for the NNPA Newswire, talks about Meek Mill, the shady judge that locked him up and mass...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

By Arashi Young | The Skanner News

On June 2, the Portland Public Schools Board announced an investigation into the lead water testing program in the district. PPS hired the law firm Stoll Berne to conduct the investigation and to issue a report within 30 days.

The analysis reviewed the systems and procedures for water testing, evaluated the management of information and identified operational or personnel breakdowns. Here are some of the most important takeaways from that report:

  • The report identified inconsistent policies and practices within every part of the lead testing program, from inconsistent testing itself to flawed internal information management to misleading communication with parents, teachers and media.
  • Measures to restrict access to drinking water after high lead test levels were ineffective or inconsistent -- knowingly exposing people to leaded water while waiting to make repairs.
  • The lead testing activities were primarily reactive and performed in response to inquiries from parents or staff, instead of preventative -- and did not follow EPA guidelines for retesting.
  • The entire responsibility for the district lead testing program fell to one individual within the system, the PPS Senior Manager of Environmental Health & Safety. Until 2014, that was Patrick Wolfe, who then retired and was replaced by Andy Fridley, who was given no training for lead testing.
  • There were serious internal communication gaps between the lead testing program and PPS executives.  Stoll Berne cited a lack of institutional knowledge on the part of executives and an absence of diligent inquiry by these high-level administrators.
  • The only record that kept track of lead testing and remediation was a database that was inconsistently updated and never audited or verified.
  • Stoll Berne described PPS communication as inaccurate and misleading. PPS website information was presented in a way that implied that after the 2001- 2002 testing that all drinking fountains were safe when they were not. The text also implied that retesting was unnecessary when that is an EPA best practice.
  • In one case, the investigation cited PPS communication as inaccurate when the former Chief of Communications & Public Affairs Jon Isaacs knowingly provided incomplete excerpts of the water testing database to the Willamette Week.
  • PPS set a policy that people should drink only from water fountains and not sink faucets. This was not well communicated. The information was found online, in an email newsletter and in a handbook, but the Wolfe and Chief Operating Officer Tony Magliano decided against district-wide labeling of sinks.

The board and executive leadership cited budget concerns and said they had prioritizing education over infrastructure or repair issues. When they did address repair issues, PPS focused on the health and safety issues that are regulated by law. Lead testing and remediation is voluntary so it went mostly unaddressed.

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