05 24 2016
  6:48 am  
     •     
read latest

breaking news

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
    Read More
  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
    Read More
  • Some hope killing will bring peace in Afghanistan     
    Read More
load morehold SHIFT key to load allload all

PHOTO: De La Salle North Catholic students on March 3 held a schoolwide forum on police accountability and youth violence prevention. The event featured a panel of students along with Mayor Charlie Hales, Police Chief Larry O'Dea and Former Oregon State Chief Justice Paul De Muniz, who is spearheading the city’s newest police accountability effort. The discussion was built around a multimedia presentation of the students’ videography, music and poetry. Lisa Loving photo

 

OLCC ‘Listening Tour’ on Cannabis Laws

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s final two listening sessions on implementation of the new recreational marijuana law will be held in Portland Thursday, March 12, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Left Bank Annex, 101 N. Weidler Street.

The previous nine meetings held in Baker City, Pendleton, Salem, Eugene, Ashland, Klamath Falls, Bend, Tigard and Clackamas together drew more than 2,700 people. The sessions are the first steps in a year-long process of getting public input on the rules necessary to implement Measure 91, the ballot measure passed by voters last November legalizing recreational marijuana.

Under the new law, personal possession of recreational marijuana becomes legal on July 1 of this year. The OLCC must begin accepting applications for commercial licenses next January, with retail stores to open by late 2016.

Learn more at http://marijuana.oregon.gov

CART captioning services for people with hearing impairment will be available at this meeting.

All meeting sites are accessible to people with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to staff at 1-800-452-6522 or Portland 503-872-5006 or send an email to laura.paul@state.or.us

 

New Washington County Support Group for Survivors of Suicide Loss

A state Mental Health Prevention and Promotion Grant was awarded to Washington County to expand trainings and provide funding to start a survivor of suicide loss support group in Washington County.

The first Suicide Bereavement Support Group in Washington County will meet on Thursday, March 12, from 6:30-8:30 pm. at Dougy Center/Linkletter Commons, 230 NE 2nd, Suite E, in Hillsboro. The group, which is one of several in the metro area, will meet on the second Thursday of each month. It is free and open to anyone who has lost someone to suicide, including spouses, children, parents, siblings, friends, coworkers and others.

Registration is not required. For more information about the group, contact Nickole Skovly at 503-453-7372, or visit the Suicide Bereavement Support’s website at www.sbsnw.org.

 

African American Health Study

As many residents of Portland know, African Americans experience poorer quality of care than any other racial/ethnic group. Research has shown that, despite efforts, healthcare disparities persist for African Americans.

In an effort to understand what can be done, a team of students at Portland State University is conducting a study to gain a better understanding of how African Americans experience stress in the healthcare system. They hope that the information obtained from participants will help improve the quality of care for African American patients.

To participate in this study, you must be 18 years or older, must have seen a healthcare provider within the last five years, and identify as Black or African American. If you are interested and meet these requirements, you can find the survey at http://goo.gl/MJSB1Z . If you prefer to respond with paper and pencil, please email AfricanAmericanHealthStudy@gmail.com or call 503-567-4801. The survey also has a Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/AfricanAmericanHealthStudy .

 

This Is Your Brain On (Legal) Drugs: The Neuroscience and Art of Cannabis and Alcohol

Humans have used intoxicants like alcohol and marijuana for thousands of years, and we modern humans are no different. The Northwest is home to thriving beer, wine, and spirits industries, and now that both Washington and Oregon permit the recreational sale and use of marijuana, there are more legal opportunities to get high.

At this Science on Tap, Wednesday, March 11, have a beer and stimulate both sides of your brain as neuroscientist Bill Griesar, PhD, and artist Jeff Leake from NW Noggin discuss both the science and art of alcohol and marijuana. Find out how these drugs affect the chemistry our brains and how they change our behavior. Also find out how some well-known artists have approached (and sometimes used) these drugs in the creation of works of art.

Doors open at 6 p.m. with the event starting at 7 p.m., at the Kiggins Theatre, 1011 Main Street, Vancouver, Wash.

For more information go to www.kigginstheatre.net.

 

RACC Hosts Public Art Murals Information Session

On Saturday, March 14, RACC hosts a free information session to help local artists and other community members learn how to organize, fund and navigate two different approaches to creating murals in the City of Portland.

The event is Saturday, March 14, 10 a.m –noon, at RACC, 411 NW Park Ave., Suite 10.
Coffee and light snacks will be provided.

Presenters include Gage Hamilton, an organizer of Forest for the Trees Northwest—a public art mural project that brought twenty artists together in August to paint murals—and Robin Corbo, a local artist known for her skill at organizing and creating community murals. Peggy Kendellen, Manager of RACC’s Public Art Murals Program, and Doug Strickler from the City’s Bureau of Development Services will also be on hand to help participants navigate the two options available for creating an exterior mural on a wall in Portland.

The workshop is free and open to artists, property owners, business owners, and community and neighborhood association members. To sign up, email publicartmurals@racc.org with the subject heading “Public Murals Workshop” and include contact information in the text of the email.

 

Tenth Annual Native Caring Conference in April

The tenth annual Native Caring Conference will be held on April 15-16 at the Three Rivers Casino and Hotel in Florence, Oregon. All Native Elder caregivers and relative caregivers of children from Northwest Indian communities are invited to attend.

The two-day conference features local and national spokespersons on Caregiver Well-Being, Medication Management, Elder Abuse, Children's Alcohol and Drug Use, and How to Communicate with Health Care Providers.

Registration deadline is April 3. The cost is $150 with a $25 discount if registration is received by March 3. The registration fee includes two lunches, dinner, and breakfast.

For more information contact: Doug Morrison, CTCLUSI (541) 997-6685; Wilson Wewa, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (541) 553-3313; or, Michelle Carson, The Klamath Tribes (541) 783-2219 ext 175.

The Native Caring Conference is hosted by: Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, The Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, Coquille Indian Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indians Reservations, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, The Klamath Tribes, Burns Paiute Tribe, AARP and the Oregon Department of Human Services State Unit on Aging.

 

For more Portland and Seattle area events, visit the Community Calendar page.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

PHOTO GALLERY

Artists Rep Grand Concourse