04 21 2015
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  • When should we use military to enforce US goals? NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Rand Paul lashed out Saturday at military hawks in the Republican Party in a clash over foreign policy dividing the packed GOP presidential field. Paul, a first-term senator from Kentucky who favors a smaller U.S. footprint in the world, said that some of his Republican colleagues would do more harm in international affairs than would leading Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The other Republicans will criticize the president and Hillary Clinton for their foreign policy, but they would just have done the same thing — just 10 times over," Paul said on the closing day of a New Hampshire GOP conference that brought about 20 presidential prospects to the first-in-the-nation primary state. "There's a group of folks in our party who would have troops in six countries right now, maybe more," Paul said. Foreign policy looms large in the presidential race as the U.S. struggles to resolve diplomatic and military conflicts across the globe. The GOP presidential class regularly rails against President Barack Obama's leadership on the world stage, yet some would-be contenders have yet to articulate their own positions, while others offered sharply different visions. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whose brother, President George W. Bush, authorized the 2003 invasion of Iraq, declined to say whether he would have done anything different then. Yet Jeb Bush acknowledged a shift in his party against new military action abroad. "Our enemies need to fear us, a little bit, just enough for them to deter the actions that create insecurity," Bush said earlier in the conference. He said restoring alliances "that will create less likelihood of America's boots on the ground has to be the priority, the first priority of the next president." The GOP's hawks were well represented at the event, led by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has limited foreign policy experience but articulated a muscular vision during his Saturday keynote address. Walker said the threats posed by radical Islamic terrorism won't be handled simply with "a couple bombings." "We're not going to wait till they bring the fight to us," Walker said. "We're going to bring the fight to them and fight on their soil." South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham addressed the question of putting U.S. troops directly in the battle against the Islamic State group militants by saying there is only one way to defeat the militants: "You go over there and you fight them so they don't come here." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suggested an aggressive approach as well. "The way to defeat ISIS is a simple and clear military objective," he said. "We will destroy them." Businesswoman Carly Fiorina offered a similar outlook. "The world is a more dangerous and more tragic place when America is not leading. And America has not led for quite some time," she said. Under Obama, a U.S.-led coalition of Western and Arab countries is conducting regular airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. also has hundreds of military advisers in Iraq helping Iraqi security forces plan operations against the Islamic State, which occupies large chunks of northern and western Iraq. Paul didn't totally reject the use of military force, noting that he recently introduced a declaration of war against the Islamic State group. But in an interview with The Associated Press, he emphasized the importance of diplomacy. He singled out Russia and China, which have complicated relationships with the U.S., as countries that could contribute to U.S. foreign policy interests. "I think the Russians and the Chinese have great potential to help make the world a better place," he said. "I don't say that naively that they're going to, but they have the potential to." Paul suggested the Russians could help by getting Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. "Maybe he goes to Russia," Paul said. Despite tensions with the U.S., Russia and China negotiated alongside Washington in nuclear talks with Iran. Paul has said he is keeping an open mind about the nuclear negotiations. "The people who already are very skeptical, very doubtful, may not like the president for partisan reasons," he said, and "just may want war instead of negotiations."
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Still from Ping Pong Summer

PHOTO: Ping Pong Summer

BIG BUDGET FILMS   

Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13 for profanity, intense violence and brief sensuality) Infinite loop sci-fi starring Tom Cruise as the recently-deceased soldier called upon to travel back in time repeatedly to defend the planet against a bloodthirsty race of aliens bent on world domination. With Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton and Brendan Gleeson.

The Fault in Our Stars (PG-13 for sexuality, brief profanity and mature themes)    

Screen adaptation of John Green’s #1 best-seller about the bittersweet romance which blossoms between a terminally-ill teenager (Shailene Woodley) and a patient in remission (Ansel Elgort) she meets at a cancer support group. With Willem Dafoe, Laura Dern, Nat Wolff and Mike Birbiglia.

INDEPENDENT & FOREIGN FILMS 

2 Autumns, 3 Winters (Unrated) Romantic dramedy about a 33 year-old bachelor (Vincent Macaigne) who divides his time between wooing a cynical woman (Maud Wyler) he meets while jogging in the park and caring for his BFF (Bastion Bouillon) after a stroke. With Thomas Blanchard, Audrey Bastien and Pauline Etienne. (In French with subtitles)

Borgman (Unrated) Jan Bijvoet stars in the title role of this psychological thriller as a hobo who destabilizes the upper-class family that befriends him. Support cast includes Hadewych Minis, Jeroen Perceval and Alex van Warmerdam. (In English and Dutch with subtitles)

Burning Blue (R for profanity, sexuality and graphic nudity) Out of the closet drama about a couple of Navy pilots (Trent Ford and Morgan Spector) whose lives and careers are turned upside-down when their forbidden love affair becomes public knowledge. Featuring Rob Mays, William Lee Scott and Tammy Blanchard.

Citizen Koch (Unrated) The Koch brothers are the focus of this eye-opening expose illustrating the expanding influence of rich individuals on American elections in the wake of the Supreme Court decision in Citizens United liberalizing the amount of money corporations can contribute to political campaigns.

The Moment (Unrated) Psychological thriller about a photographer (Jennifer Jason Leigh) in a tumultuous affair who lands in a mental hospital following the mysterious disappearance of her troubled boyfriend (Martin Henderson) only to be befriended there by a fellow patient who bears an uncanny resemblance to her missing beau. With Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Alia Shawkat and Meatloaf.

Obvious Child (R for profanity and sensuality) Romantic comedy, set in Brooklyn, about an aspiring comedienne (Jenny Slate) who’s left reeling by being fired, dumped and knocked up until she meets a perfect gentleman (Jake Lacy) on what promises to be either her best or worst Valentine’s Day ever. With Gaby Hoffmann, Richard Kind, Polly Draper and Cindy Cheung.

Ping Pong Summer (Unrated) Coming-of-age comedy, set in 1985, revolving around a 13 year-old kid (Marcello Conte) who becomes obsessed with hip-hop and table tennis during a vacation spent with his family in Ocean City Maryland. Co-starring Susan Sarandon, Amy Sedaris and Judah Friedlander.

Rigor Mortis (Unrated) Haunted house horror flick set in a Hong Kong tenement tower whose creepy occupants include zombies, ghosts and vampires. Ensemble includes Anthony Chan, Siu-Ho Chin, Kara Hui, Hoi-Pang Lo and Richard Ng. (In Cantonese with subtitles)  

The Sacrament (R for profanity, violence, disturbing images and brief drug use) Macabre horror flick about a fashion photographer (Kentucker Audley) whose search for his missing sister (Amy Seimetz) leads to a supposedly utopian commune with a charismatic guru (Gene Jones). Featuring Joe Swanberg, Kate Lyn Sheil, AJ Bowen and Derek Roberts.     

Supermensch (R for nudity, profanity, sexual references and drug use) Mike Myers makes his directorial debut with this reverential documentary highlighting the career of Shep Gordon, the legendary super agent-turned-Buddhist who managed the careers of such music icons as Pink Floyd, Luther Vandross, Alice Cooper and Teddy Pendergrass.

Trust Me (R for profanity) Hollywood satire chronicling the cutthroat competition between two agents (Clark Gregg and Sam Rockwell) to sign a budding young starlet (Saxon Sharbino). With Felicity Huffman, Allison Janney, William H. Macy, Niecy Nash, Amanda Peet and Molly Shannon. 

 

 

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