04-21-2018  4:37 am      •     
The Skanner Report
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Think & Drink with Rinku Sen and Mary Li

Event takes place Wednesday, May 16, at Alberta Rose Theater ...

April 24 is Voter Registration Deadline for May 15 Primary Election

Tuesday, April 24, is voter registration and party choice deadline for May 15 Primary Election ...

Portland Libraries Celebrate National Poetry Month

April poetry events and recommended reading from Multnomah County libraries ...

PCRI Launches the Pathway 1000 Implementation Plan

Pathway 1000 a bold and ambitious 10-year displacement mitigation initiative ...

AG Rosenblum Launches New Resource on Oregon’s New Gun Safety Laws

One-page handout aims to educate Oregonians about the new law ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Will HUD Secretary Ben Carson Enforce the Fair Housing Act?

Julianne Malveaux questions HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s ability to enforce the Fair Housing Act ...

Waiting While Black in Philadelphia Can Get You Arrested

Reggie Shuford on the daily indignities African-Americans face in Philadelphia and around the country ...

Black People Must Vote or Reap the Consequences

Jeffrey Boney on the importance of voting in the Black community ...

Civil Rights Community Doesn’t Need to Look Farr for Racism in Trump Court Nominees

Derrick Johnson, NAACP President and CEO, explains organization's opposition to Trump's nomination of Thomas Farr ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Tom Cohen CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- FBI Director Robert Mueller said Thursday that secret government surveillance programs disclosed by leaks of classified information have been conducted in adherence with the U.S. Constitution and federal laws.

"The legality has been ensured" by the Department of Justice, and special federal courts set up to handle surveillance issues "ruled and monitored these programs and again, ensured the legality," he told the House Judiciary Committee.

Mueller's remark about the programs that collect telephone and computer information were the latest government defense of them as vital for national security, despite concerns that they go beyond the scope of the Patriot Act passed after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Rep. John Conyers of Michigan complained Thursday about what he depicted as overreach by law enforcement and intelligence agencies in the name of national security.

"We are a nation of laws, not men," Conyers, the ranking Democrat on the panel, said in his opening statement at the hearing.

He told Mueller that in his opinion, the FBI's role in the surveillance programs disclosed by the leaks "are inconsistent with the requirements of the Patriot Act" and violate the privacy rights of citizens.

"It's my fear that we are on the verge of becoming a surveillance state, collecting billions of electronic records on law-abiding Americans every single day," Conyers said.

In particular, he said, Section 215 of the Patriot Act "is being used to engage in a nationwide dragnet of telecommunications records."

Conyers also complained about the secrecy of the activities, saying the government relied too much on covering up what it was doing through classified programs.

He said he was co-sponsoring legislation that would address "the overbreadth and impenetrability of the surveillance programs."

Mueller said that members of Congress were briefed about the covert programs and that legislators had the authority to change the law if desired.

"If a change were to be made ... so be it, and we would follow the letter of the law," he said. At the same time, he said, the classified leaks that revealed the programs hurt national security.

™ & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

 

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Report