05 24 2016
  1:00 am  
     •     
read latest

breaking news

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
    Read More
  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
    Read More
  • Some hope killing will bring peace in Afghanistan     
    Read More
load morehold SHIFT key to load allload all

Born in Chicago on Oct. 25, 1971, Craig Robinson is currently appearing in the final season of "The Office" on NBC, where he portrays acerbic Dunder-Mifflin employee Darryl Philbin. He is definitely a world away from his original career intentions; before deciding to pursue a comedy career full-time, Robinson was a K-8 teacher in the Chicago Public Schools.



He had earned his undergraduate degree from Illinois State University and a Master's in Education from St. Xavier University. It was while studying education that he discovered his love of acting and comedy upon joining the famed Second City Theatre.

Craig made his mark on the comedy circuit at the 1998 Montreal "Just For Laughs" Festival. That year, he also won the Oakland Comedy Festival Awards and the Miller Genuine Draft 1996 Comedy Search. He soon went on to perform his act on "The Jimmy Kimmel Show," and "Real Time with Bill Maher."

His rise to success with "The Office" and his stand-up prowess quickly brought him to the attention of comedy maven Judd Apatow. Robinson made audiences question their notions of vanity playing the sensitive bouncer in "Knocked Up." He then kept audiences glued to their seats as one of the henchman hunting Seth Rogen and James Franco's bumbling stoner characters in "Pineapple Express," and made fans squirm when he co-starred with Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks in "Zack and Miri Make a Porno."

In 2010, Craig starred alongside Rob Corddry and John Cusack in "Hot Tub Time Machine." The story follows three grown-up men (Robinson, Corddry, and Cusack) as they visit the hot tub where they once partied, accidentally discover it is now a time machine, and travel back to their raunchy heyday in the mid-1980s. Fans' voices spoke loudly, and early negotiations are currently in progress for a sequel.

Here, he talks about his first leading man role as Wade Walker in "Peeples," a comedy co-starring Kerry Washington.

Kam Williams: Hi Craig, thanks for the interview.
Craig Robinson: Thank you for getting the word out. I appreciate it, Kam.  

KW: What interested you in Peeples?
CR: When I met with [director] Tina Gordon Chism, I was impressed with her passion about the project. She had lived this experience of dating someone from a family with so many secrets, and watching them unravel. So, she knew what she was talking about. And when she let me know that Kerry Washington was playing the love interest, I went, "Okay, I'm in! Let's go ahead and do it."

KW: Harriet Pakula-Teweles says: You've done some great cameo and support roles, but now landed a lead role here. Congratulations! So, in Peeples, your fans will see more of you. How was it playing a main character and working with [producer] Tyler Perry?
CR: I worked with Tyler before on Daddy's Little Girls. He couldn't be smarter or more laid back and cool. He's always throwing out lines and is funny as hell. And he was shining his light on Peeples, too, lending his name to showcase Tina as a first-time director, and me as a first-time lead. I'm humbled and honored to work with him. He's great!

KW: Editor/Legist Patricia Turnier would like to know what was it like to on the set with legendary actors like Diahann Carroll and Melvin Van Peebles?
CR: Diahann Carroll delivered a very moving speech at the start of the whole project, and Melvin pulled me aside on the set and told me to, "Stay strong!" in a way that carried considerable heft. These people are legends, and we couldn't have been more thrilled about their participation in the movie and blessing it. It was superb.

KW: Patricia also says: Given that you are a singer, are you interested in recording an album one day?
CR: Yes I am. I have a sound. It's called funk mixed with stank. That's what I do.

KW: What's it like having the same name as First Lady Michelle Obama's brother?
CR: I was once dating a woman who got very upset after confusing the two of us when she found my picture next to his bio which indicated that he's divorced with kids, and remarried. So, if you can imagine, that's what it's like.

KW: Larry Greenberg says: I'm just crazy about films with time travel.  Where there any special issues or tricky scenes when you played Nick in Hot Tub Time Machine?
CR: Yes, there was a special issue. Her name was Jessica Paré. She was topless with me in the hot tub. So, yes, that was a very special moment, and I watch the movie every night because of that scene. 

KW: Dinesh Sharma asks: Do you think that your role describes a challenge most black men face today, of trying to fit into upper-class black society? Or was the movie just Meet the Parents with an African-American twist?
CR: Peeples is definitely not Meet the Parents. It's more a movie about family secrets. It does explore class issues somewhat, but it's mostly about living your own truth. 

KW: What is your favorite dish to cook?
CR: I can bake the hell out of some chicken, my friend.

KW: The bookworm Troy Johnson question: What was the last book you read?
CR: Celestine Prophecies.

KW: The music maven Heather Covington question: What was the last song you listened to?
CR: Butterflies by Michael Jackson.

KW: The Uduak Oduok question: Who is your favorite clothes designer?
CR: JSLV, Just Live, it's a company in California.

KW: When you look in the mirror, what do you see?
CR: Craig Robinson… I see growth.

KW: If you could have one wish instantly granted, what would that be for?
CR: To be able hug my deceased family members, friends and godfather.

KW: The Ling-Ju Yen question: What is your earliest childhood memory?
CR: Banging on the piano while my grandmother was watching me. I'd run up to her and ask: "How was that, Grandma?" And she'd say, "That was beautiful, baby!" And I'd run back to the piano and play some more. I'm sure that's why I still play today, because I was encouraged from such a young age, 2 or 3.

KW: The Judyth Piazza question: What key quality do you believe all successful people share?
CR: Determination!

KW: The Mike Pittman question" asks: What was your best career move?
CR: Choosing my manager, Mark Schulman.

KW: PBS President Neal Shapiro asks: If you could really time travel and live in another period, which one would you choose?
CR: The Sixties, because it was the beginning of Rock & Roll. All the songs sounded alike, since they were using the same three chords, which would make it easy to hop out and rock.  

KW: Is there any question no one ever asks you, that you wish someone would?
CR: That's a great question. I can't think of one.

KW: The Viola Davis question: Who do you really believe you are when you go home as opposed to the person you pretend to be on the red carpet?
CR: The red carpet is weird because, when they don't know who you are, you're standing there posing and nobody's taking pictures of you. And when they do know you, they're calling your name from every which way and you don't know in which direction to turn. For me, I'm more in control at home. On the carpet, I want to be in control, but it can be overwhelming.

KW: The Gabby Douglas question: If you had to choose another profession, what would it be?
CR: Rock star! Singing songs that the whole world knows, like my favorite band, Earth, Wind and Fire.

KW: The Anthony Mackie question: Is there something that you promised to do if you became famous, that you still haven't done yet?
CR: No, because I don't make promises unless I know I'm gonna keep 'em.

KW: The Anthony Anderson question: If you could have a superpower, which one would you choose?
CR: Invisibility!

KW: The Jamie Foxx question: If you only had 24 hours to live, what would you do? Would you do the bad stuff, you never got a chance to do, or would you do good stuff to make sure you make it into heaven?
CR: I would live like I'm already living. If I couldn't get to my family, I'd hit my favorite restaurant. I'd seize the moment.

KW: The Kerry Washington question: If you were an animal, what animal would you be?
CR: A whale.

KW: The Sanaa Lathan question: What excites you?
CR: The little things that let me know I'm on the right path, like running into an old friend, or getting into the car and catching an awesome song from the beginning.

KW: The Melissa Harris-Perry question: How did your first big heartbreak impact who you are as a person?
CR: I don't get too close in relationships. I kinda have my arm out, like the Heisman trophy, because I don't want to hurt somebody the way I was hurt.

KW: The Harriet Pakula-Teweles question: With so many classic films being redone, is there a remake you'd like to star in with an eye toward a particular role.
CR: Yeah, Cannonball Run.

KW: Attorney Bernadette Beekman asks: Do you have a favorite charity?
CR: No, I don't.

KW: The Nancy Lovell Question: Why do you love doing what you do?
CR: Because it brings me closer to people, and it lets me explore who I am. It's a chance for me to be connected. Whenever I'm performing live, the first thing I look for is to make a connection.

KW: What is your favorite way of performing?
CR: I'm in my element when I'm alone on stage with a microphone and a keyboard.

KW: What advice do you have for anyone who wants to follow in your footsteps?
CR: Be yourself, because you're special. There's only one of you. Second, be tenacious, visualize success, and them live it. And remember everything you learned in kindergarten.

KW: The Tavis Smiley question: How do you want to be remembered?
CR: As a joy!

KW: Thanks again, Craig. I really appreciate having this opportunity, brother, and best of luck with Peeples.
CR: Thank you. You are phenomenal, Kam.

Oregon Lottery
Calendar

PHOTO GALLERY

Artists Rep Grand Concourse