08-17-2022  10:40 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Basic Guaranteed Income Program to Launch for Black Portlanders

Brown Hope’s Black Resilience Fund argues the impact of direct cash payments. 

Oregon Justice Fires Panel Due to Lack of Public Defenders

Criminal defendants in Oregon who have gone without legal representation due to a shortage of public defenders filed a lawsuit in May that alleges the state is violating their constitutional right to legal counsel and a speedy trial.

River Chief Imprisoned for Fishing Fights for Sacred Rights

Wilbur Slockish Jr. has been shot at, had rocks hurled at him. He hid underground for months, and then spent 20 months serving time in federal prisons across the country — all of that for fishing in the Columbia River.

Starbucks Asks Labor Board to Halt Union Votes Temporarily

A store in Overland Park, Kansas is one of 314 U.S. Starbucks locations where workers have petitioned the NLRB to hold union elections since late last year. More than 220 of those stores have voted to unionize.

NEWS BRIEFS

Measure on Portland Government to Appear as-Is on Ballot

Politicians, business leaders and civic activists have called for reshaping Portland’s form of government, which they say...

The Regional Arts & Culture Council Rolls Out New Grant Program

The Arts3C grant program is designed to be fully responsive to what artists and art makers in the community need funding to support ...

OHA Introduces New Monkeypox (hMPXV) Website

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon ...

Wyden, Colleagues Renew Request for FDA to Address Concerns about Dangerous Pulse Oximeter Inaccuracies Affecting Communities of Color

“There are decades of research showing inaccurate results when pulse oximeters are used to monitor people of color” ...

Inslee Issues Directive Outlining Monkeypox Virus Response

As of Friday, Washington state had confirmed 265 monkeypox cases. ...

Wind energy boom and golden eagles collide in the US West

CODY, Wyo. (AP) — The rush to build wind farms to combat climate change is colliding with preservation of one of the U.S. West’s most spectacular predators — the golden eagle — as the species teeters on the edge of decline. Ground zero in the conflict is Wyoming, a stronghold...

Anti-psychotic drugs ordered for man charged with murder

RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — The man accused of fatally shooting a man inside Richland’s Fred Meyer store was ordered to take mental health medications. Superior Court Judge Joe Burrowes ruled Tuesday that Eastern State Hospital can require Aaron Kelly, 40, to take the anti-psychotic...

Mizzou full of optimism with new QB, defensive coordinator

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz is on his third defensive coordinator in three years at Missouri, and the Tigers are about to start their fifth different quarterback in the season opener in the last five years. Sounds like a program that should be on shaky ground. ...

Hoosiers looking for a turnaround after dismal 2021 season

Indiana linebacker Cam Jones and quarterback Jack Tuttle took matters into their own hands this offseason. They called their teammates together to discuss the goals and aspirations of the program, the need to always play with an edge and to break down precisely why things went wrong...

OPINION

No One Ever Told You About Black August?

Black America lives in a series of deserts. Many of us live in food deserts, financial deserts, employment deserts, and most of us live in information deserts. ...

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Wisconsin school board votes in favor of pride flag ban

WALES, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin school board voted in favor of a policy that prohibits teachers and staff from displaying gay pride flags and other items that district officials consider political in nature. The Kettle Moraine School Board voted unanimously Tuesday to keep a code of...

Bangladesh PM tells UN that Myanmar must take Rohingya back

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Bangladesh's leader told a visiting U.N. official on Wednesday that hundreds of thousands of ethnic minority Rohingya refugees living in overcrowded camps in Bangladesh must return home to Myanmar, where they had fled waves of violent persecution. Prime...

'The Butler' author Wil Haygood wins prestigious book award

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Writer Wil Haygood, author of multiple nonfiction books chronicling the lives of 20th-century Black Americans including “The Butler,” has won a prestigious book award. The Dayton Literary Peace Prize announced Wednesday that Haygood — himself originally...

ENTERTAINMENT

Long-hidden synagogue mural gets rehabbed, relocated

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A mural that was painted in a Vermont synagogue more than 100 years ago by a Lithuanian immigrant — and hidden behind a wall for years— has been termed a rare piece of art and has been painstakingly moved and restored. The large colorful...

Film academy apologizes to Littlefeather for 1973 Oscars

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather stood on the Academy Awards stage on behalf of Marlon Brando to speak about the depiction of Native Americans in Hollywood films, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences apologized to her for the abuse she endured. ...

Review: Watkins Family Hour captures spirit of variety shows

“Vol. II,” Watkins Family Hour (Family Hour Records) Tom Petty’s pianist plays “Tennessee Waltz,” an Ernest Tubb classic rides a Bo Diddley beat, and a deep cut by the ’60s band the Zombies becomes a Disney-style lullaby. The latest album from Watkins Family...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Missing India soldier's body found on glacier after 38 years

LEH, India (AP) — The remains of an Indian army soldier have been found more than 38 years after he went missing...

Youth mental health is in crisis. Are schools doing enough?

CECILIA, Ky. (AP) — For fourth-grader Leah Rainey, the school day now begins with what her teacher calls an...

CDC director announces organization shake-up aimed at speed

NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the nation's top public health agency on Wednesday announced a shake-up of the...

Kenya's president-elect will 'engage' in any court challenge

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenyan president-elect William Ruto says that if there’s a court challenge to the...

China and US spar over climate on Twitter

BEIJING (AP) — The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy,...

South Korean leader: Seoul won't seek own nuclear deterrent

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s president said Wednesday his government has no plans to pursue its own...

Liz Sidoti AP National Political Writer

OXON HILL, Md. (AP) -- Embattled GOP Chairman Michael Steele fought to hang onto his post Friday atop the Republican National Committee.

Four challengers argued that they would be better stewards of the party heading into the 2012 elections, when defeating President Barack Obama will be the GOP's primary objective.

Steele, who surprised even his closest aides by seeking re-election, was undeterred as he presided over the RNC's winter meeting, perhaps for the last time.

"I want to thank you so much for the chance to serve at a time when our party was changing, struggling to grow, regain its footing, find its voice, reconnect with people and to stand proud again," he told the 168 committee members before voting started. Eighty-five votes are needed for victory.

A telegenic though gaffe-prone party leader, Steele registered some level of public support as voting began. But many committee members were keeping their intentions private and several rounds of votes were expected, making it tough to predict the winner.

Steele argues that he should be re-elected because of the GOP's record of coast-to-coast victories while he was chairman last fall, including winning control of the House. But he doesn't mention that Republican operatives formed a network of outside groups that adopted traditional national party functions out of a concern about the RNC's ability under Steele to raise money and deploy resources to key races.

Steele's challengers were: Reince Priebus, the Wisconsin Republican Party chairman who ran Steele's chairmanship bid in 2009; Maria Cino, a New York native and a veteran party operative who served in the Bush administration; Ann Wagner, a former Missouri state GOP chair who once was an ambassador under George W. Bush; and Saul Anuzis, a former chairman of the Michigan Republican Party who lost to Steele two years ago.

The victor will be tasked with running the top Republican Party organization in the country.

The job includes serving as the leading spokesman promoting the party's agenda and countering that of Democrats, raising money to help Republicans win in the next elections, and beefing up a get-out-the-vote effort that critics say languished under Steele.

Most urgently, the new chairman must retire an RNC debt of nearly $22 million owed to vendors and banks, as well as lure back demoralized donors who have been so frustrated with Steele's management that they sent their dollars elsewhere or didn't open their wallets at all last year. The party had only about $1 million cash on hand at year's end.

The next leader also will have to figure out how to navigate a GOP civil war in which conservatives and tea party disciples are trying to pull the Republican Party even further to the right, much to the chagrin of moderates and some longtime establishment leaders.

The first black to lead the Republican Party, Steele was a party outsider elected to a two-year term in January 2008 just as Obama - the country's first black president - was taking office.

Since then, Steele, the former lieutenant governor of Maryland, has spent much of his tenure fending off criticism. He faced frequent complaints about questionable spending, anemic fundraising, staff shake-ups and cringe-inducing comments.

Longtime establishment Republicans and GOP elders in Washington argued that he damaged the party's image and its long-term fiscal health.

Steele angered them by predicting the GOP wouldn't win House control last fall; Republicans did win. He also drew their ire when he criticized fellow Republicans in a book that GOP leaders didn't know he was writing until it was published.

He lashed out at critics, telling them to "get a life" and "shut up." Steele also drew fire for giving $20,000 to the GOP in the Northern Mariana Islands, and for collecting payment for his speeches.

Demands for him to resign came last year after the disclosure that RNC money was spent on a $2,000 tab at a sex-themed California night club, and when he said that the 9-year-old conflict in Afghanistan was a mistaken "war of Obama's choosing." It began under Bush.

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