12-17-2017  5:15 pm      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

Exhibit Explores the Legacy of Portland Bird Watchers

Dedicated bird watchers catapult a conservationist movement ...

Special Call for Stories about the Spanish Flu

Genealogical Forum of Oregon seeks stories from the public about one of history's most lethal outbreaks ...

Joint Office of Homeless Services Announces Severe Weather Strategy

Those seeking shelter should call 211 or visit 211.org. Neighbors needed to volunteer, donate cold-weather apparel ...

Q&A with Facebook's Global Director of Diversity Maxine Williams

A conversation on diversity and the tech industry ...

City Announces Laura John as Tribal Liason

Laura John brings an extensive background in tribal advocacy and community engagement to the city of Portland ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Don’t Delay, Sign-up for Affordable Healthcare Today

The deadline to enroll or modify healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act is December 15. ...

The Skanner Editorial: Alabama Voters Must Reject Moore

Allegations of predatory behavior are troubling – and so is his resume ...

Payday Lenders Continue Attack on Consumer Protections

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes that two bills that favor predatory lenders has received bipartisan...

Hundreds Rallied for Meek Mill, but What About the Rest?

Lynette Monroe, a guest columnist for the NNPA Newswire, talks about Meek Mill, the shady judge that locked him up and mass...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Wenqian Zhu CNN Money

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Jobs for journalists are on the upswing.

That's good news for an industry in upheaval. Just this month, there's been a flurry of deals involving struggling marquee American publications. Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post, Red Sox owner John Henry purchased The Boston Globe, and Newsweek was bought by a digital news company IBT Media. Job cuts had been common at all three publications in recent years.

Now, a new survey from the University of Georgia shows that the tide may be turning for journalism graduates. About 66% of 2012 journalism graduates landed a full-time job roughly six to eight months after graduation, up from 62% in 2011. It was a also a big jump from 56% in 2009, during the depths of the recession, when the number of graduates that landed a job was at the lowest point in two decades .

"Employers might be shedding senior-level jobs, but there's always pressure to hire entry-level jobs," said Lee Becker, professor of journalism at the University of Georgia and co-author of the report. Becker said the number of jobs might also be rising because of the increase in start-up online publications.

Journalism graduates have faced a tough market in recent years. The effect of the recession was exacerbated by the dramatic shifts in the industry.

The rise in digital media and the different ways in how people consume news and entertainment, via their smartphones and tablets, has led to a decline in newspaper and magazine circulation. Thousands of newsroom jobs have been slashed at both large and small publications.

In keeping with these changes, journalists who work at online publications are now starting to command top salaries, whereas magazine and radio reporters' pay is below the industry average, the survey found.

Overall, salaries have also been rising. The median annual starting salary climbed to $32,000 in 2012, from $31,000 in 2011.

But it's not yet time to pop the champagne.

Journalists' salaries are a lot lower than the median annual salary of $42,666 for all 2012 graduates, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

That's not too different from how it's been historically, because people are attracted to the glamor of a journalist's job, rather than the pay.

"Being a journalist is more of a calling than a job," said William McKeen, chairman of the journalism department at Boston University College of Communication.

Other firms are also noticing the uptick. Job postings for journalists are up about 30% since 2009, according to Joseph Jaccom, U.S. job manager at Gorkana, a media intelligence firm.

Still, it's not enough to take away the anxiety over jobs for journalism students. Rachel Gross, a graduate student at Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, will graduate this December. She has some solid credentials -- she interned at Wired magazine and freelanced for The New York Times Bay Area.

But Gross is mentally preparing herself for a career that might not be as steady.

"I'm freelancing now and would like to keep freelancing after I graduate," Gross said. "It will be great if I do get a full-time job."

 

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