01-19-2022  5:39 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Washington Students' Test Scores Drop Significantly

Reports show that between 2019 and 2021, the overall percentage of students who met state standards on the math portion of the exam fell by 20 percentage points.

The Skanner Foundation Drum Major for Justice 2022 is Teressa Raiford

Through political campaigns, legal actions, founding the grassroots organizing group Don't Shoot Portland and through her fearless determination to speak up against racial injustice, Portland-born Teressa Raiford has made a lasting impression on our city and our state

Paid Workplace Training Internships Program Receives Support From City

Black, Latinx students receive skilled on-the-job training, career coaching, through POIC-RAHS program

Oregon Supreme Court OKs Dropping Bar Exam for Alternatives

The state’s highest court in a unanimous vote “expressed approval in concept” to a pair of alternative pathways designed for law students and postgraduates seeking admittance to the state bar

NEWS BRIEFS

Revamped TriMet Website Makes Planning Trips Easier With Map-Based Tools

Riders can now track real-time locations of buses and trains on their smartphone ...

PHOTOS: Founder of The American History Traveling Museum: The Unspoken Truths Honored

Delbert Richardson's Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha XI Chapter fraternity brothers presented him a plaque that reads “Your commitment to...

St. Andrew Parish Announces 2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards

Tony Jones was honored with the 2022 Parish Service Award, and the award for Community Service went to Terrance Moses ...

Culture + Trauma: An Artist Comes Home

An installation at the Alberta Arts Salon curated by Bobby Fouther is a visioning of the uncensored Black life. ...

MLK Day March Starts at Peninsula Park

Humboldt Neighborhood Association invites the public to participate in the March for Human Rights and Dignity in commemoration of the...

Lawsuit says new majority Latino district in WA a 'facade'

SEATTLE (AP) — A Latino civil rights organization and others filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday that says new political maps in Washington state approved by a bipartisan redistricting panel intentionally dilute Hispanic voters' influence. The legal action in the U.S. District Court...

Man pleads no contest to shooting that killed 1, wounded 2

ROSEBURG, Ore. (AP) — A Roseburg man pleaded no contest to second-degree murder and two counts of assault with a weapon in connection with a shooting outside a motel that killed one person and wounded two others. Devin McNamara, 34, entered the pleas in Douglas County Circuit Court...

UNLV promotes interim AD Harper to full-time job

LAS VEGAS (AP) — UNLV has promoted interim athletic director Erick Harper to serve in the job full time. Harper's hiring, announced on Monday, was effective Jan. 1. He had served as interim athletic director since Desiree Reed-Francois left UNLV for Missouri in August. ...

Army stuns Missouri in Armed Forces Bowl on last-second FG

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Cole Talley kicked a 41-yard field goal as time expired and Army rallied to beat Missouri 24-22 in the Armed Forces Bowl on Wednesday night. After the Tigers took a 22-21 lead on a touchdown with 1:11 to play, third-string quarterback Jabari Laws led Army...

OPINION

OP-ED: A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand

January 6th, Voting Rights and the Tyranny Threatening America ...

Support Nikole Hannah-Jones and The 1619 Project

This important and ambitious project pulled back the curtain of euphemistic rhetoric composing American historiography that points only to the good in our history and sweeps under the rug the evil deeds perpetrated against people of color ...

In 2021, Organized Labor is Again Flexing its Muscles

We have seen dramatic change in the makeup of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) under President Biden. ...

Study Reveals Racial Pay Gap for Social Media Influencers

The racial pay gap has long presented issues for African Americans in Corporate America and other industries. It’s now filtered to social media. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Raw Senate debate in fight to end voting bill filibuster

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators faced off after an emotional, raw debate Wednesday on voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital for protecting democracy but that almost certainly will be defeated without a filibuster rules change, in what would be a stinging setback for...

Timeline of events since George Floyd's arrest and death

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A timeline of key events that began with George Floyd's arrest on May 25, 2020, by four police officers in Minneapolis: May 25, 2020 — Minneapolis police officers respond to a call shortly after 8 p.m. about a possible counterfeit bill being used at a corner...

Former Oklahoma jailer pleads guilty over inmate assault

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A former Oklahoma jailer has pleaded guilty to violating an inmate’s civil rights by kicking and striking him in a 2020 assault, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Johnnie Drewery, 27, faces up to 10 years in prison when he’s sentenced in a few months, the...

ENTERTAINMENT

Bronx native Cardi B offers to pay fire victim burial costs

NEW YORK (AP) — Cardi B has offered to pay the burial costs for all 17 people killed in a fire that ripped through a New York City high-rise. New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced Wednesday that the Grammy-winning rapper had offered the financial relief for victims of the fire in...

Singer Fred Parris of the Five Satins dead at age 85

NEW YORK (AP) — Fred Parris, the lead singer of the 1950s harmony group the Five Satins and composer of the classic doo-wop ballad “In the Still of the Night,” has died at age 85. Parris died Jan. 13 after a brief illness, according to his music manager, Pat Marafiote. Parris...

HBO leads GLAAD Media Awards for LGBTQ representation

NEW YORK (AP) — HBO and HBO Max have become the top contenders at the GLAAD Media Awards with a combined 19 nominations, landing the bulk of its nods for its TV shows like “Hacks,” “The Other Two” and “The Sex Lives of College Girls.” The annual awards honors media for...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Biden says Putin will pay 'dear price' if he invades Ukraine

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Wednesday he thinks Russia will invade Ukraine and warned President...

US begins offering 1B free COVID tests, but many more needed

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, people across the U.S. can log on to a government website and order free,...

Colorado coal town grapples with future as plant shuts down

CRAIG, Colorado (AP) — In a quiet valley tucked away from Colorado’s bustling ski resorts, far from his...

Libya aims to maintain oil output after elections delay

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — The head of Libya’s national oil company said on Wednesday that his country is targeting...

Red Cross: Hack exposes data on 515,000 vulnerable people

GENEVA (AP) — The International Committee of the Red Cross, which is best known for helping war victims, says...

French actor Gaspard Ulliel, 37, dies after ski accident

LYON, France (AP) — French actor Gaspard Ulliel, known for appearing in Chanel perfume ads as well as film and...

Helen Silvis

Floods. Fires. Snow and ice storms. Earthquakes and epidemics. Terrorist attacks. Emergencies happen. In fact, according to FEMA , we've had 69 disasters this year already, in the United States -- 43 of them in Washington and 23 in Oregon.  

Oregon Rep. David Wu is leading an effort to improve our ability to predict and prepare for natural hazards. Chairing a hearing in the Science Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation last week, Wu called for a coordinated approach to all disaster research funding.

"Wind and fire cause approximately $28 billion worth of damage and kill an average of 4,350 Americans each year," Wu said. "The key to successful mitigation of any and all potential hazards is a coordinated and effective public education program."

Wu is advocating for a single hazards mitigation program to fund research into wind, fire, earthquakes, tsunamis and other disasters, instead of the current piecemeal funding system.

Disasters, whether natural or manmade, can cause tremendous damage, destruction and death. Nobody can predict when a disaster will strike, or exactly who will suffer.
 But using the data we have collected over time, experts can predict the kinds of disasters that are most likely to happen and where.  Nationally, for example Texas, California and Oklahoma and Florida rank one to four in the list of disaster prone states. Washington state is ranked number 20 with 43 emergencies declared so far this year while Oregon ranks number 33 with 23 declared disasters.

Few of us want to spend our lives worrying about disasters that probably will never happen. Yet we are told everyone should be prepared to cope in an emergency. So what kind of disasters are likely to happen in the Northwest?

In both Washington and Oregon states, the record tells us that the most likely natural disasters are winter storms, floods, mudslides and fires, Earthquakes and droughts are rarer although potentially even more devastating. Multnomah County's 2005 hazard mitigation assessment mapped the areas most vulnerable to natural disasters. That included flooding in low-lying areas of Portland and fires in natural areas such as Mock's Crest. King County's emergency management site lists 16 hazards from avalanches and power outages to hazardous materials spills.

Which potential danger would hurt Northwest residents the most? According to the State of Oregon's 2006 hazard analysis and mitigation plan, the three potentially most devastating natural disasters, would be of disaster prone states. Washington state is ranked number 20 with 43 emergencies declared so far this year while Oregon ranks number 33 with 23 declared disasters. Few of us want to spend our lives worrying about disasters that probably will never happen. Yet everyone should be prepared to cope in an emergency. So what kind of disasters are likely to happen in the Northwest?In both Washington and Oregon states, the record tells us that the most likely natural disasters are winter storms, floods, mudslides and fires, Earthquakes and droughts are rarer although potentially even more devastating. Multnomah County's 2005 hazard mitigation assessment mapped the areas most vulnerable to natural disasters. That included flooding in low-lying areas of Portland and fires in natural areas such as Mock's Crest. King County's emergency management site lists from avalanches and power outages to hazardous materials spills. Which potential danger would hurt Northwest residents the most? According to the State of Oregon's 2006 hazard analysis and mitigation plan, the three potentially most devastating natural disasters, would be

A major earthquake

A tsunami, or

A volcanic eruption.

The last time a large earthquake hit the Pacific Northwest was in the year 1700, said John Vidale, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. "A big earthquake of magnitude nine comes about once every 500 years, so we have a 10 percent chance of seeing one in the next 50 years."

Video

Watch this video where Jonathan Jui speaks about disaster preparedness, focusing on the events of Hurricane Katrina.



A former UCLA professor, who is now Washington State Seismologist, Vidale says studies of Seattle and Portland suggest that Seattle would suffer more damage than previously thought if an earthquake hit the Puget Sound area. "We're thinking that Seattle is more dangerous than we had thought because of the big basin in the Puget Sound," he said. "Portland seems like it may be less in danger than we had thought." However, he said, "If a six occurred in Portland it could do a lot of damage."

Vidale said the good news is that better seismometers and more careful studies have improved our ability to predict and warn citizens of an approaching earthquake.

The risk of a coastal tsunami is similar to risk of an earthquake. In fact tsunamis are caused by earthquakes under the ocean floor. All coastal areas could be affected.

Man made disasters, such as terrorist attacks, chemical spills and radiation leaks, are more difficult to predict. But experts say that families and businesses who prepare for a natural disaster will be prepared for any kind of disaster. The keys to being prepared are to make a plan for what you would do if:

Your family was separated when a disaster struck

You had to stay in your home for several days

Your home had no power or water supply

Local telephones won't work

Roads were closed

Shops and pharmacies were closed

 

LINKED STORIES
Prepare, Survive a Disaster
When Disaster Strikes It's Up to You
72-hour Emergency Kits and Family Plans
Wanted: Heroes
What Do You Do When All the Lights Go Out
Disasters Are Not Rare, FEMA Count 69 a year
Multnomah County Info and Trainings

The Skanner Foundation's Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events