05-21-2018  5:47 am      •     
The Skanner Report

Northwest News

Some groups ask that students be given time to make grade

Washington's public schools chief will not recommend that the WASL math and science high-school graduation requirements be delayed, though some education groups and legislators say students need more time.
"To delay math and science will slow down progress in two areas our future depends on," said Terry Bergeson, head of the state office of public instruction. Gov. Christine Gregoire has also opposed delaying the Washington Assessment of Student Learning standards.
Nearly half of 10th-graders did not pass the math section of the WASL last spring. The passage rate was worse for minority students, with just 23 percent of African Americans and 25 percent of Hispanics meeting standards. About 35 percent of sophomores passed the science portion of the WASL.
These students — the Class of 2008 — will be the first required to pass the WASL math, reading and writing tests to earn a high school diploma. Passing the science section will become a graduation requirement in 2010.


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Slumping donations, higher costs impacting hunger relief operations

Since 1977, the Emergency Feeding Program of Seattle and King County has served the hungry and provided relief to individuals and families in crisis. But now, the program is the one in crisis. In desperate need of donations to keep feeding the hungry, the program is turning down requests for food. It has suffered cuts in funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Washington State Emergency Food Assistance Program and grants from King County cities.


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Superintendent Raj Manhas" school closure plans have drawn ire

Seattle Schools Superintendent Raj Manhas, who has faced scorching criticism over plans to close several schools, said Friday he will step down when his contract expires next August.
"This is a personal decision I have made in the interest of my family," Manhas said at a news conference. "I believe I have fulfilled my responsibilities as superintendent."


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U.S. Rep. Darlene Hooley, D-Ore., center, joins Dietrich Williams-Mott, left, and Robert Mott, owners of D&R Catering, in their Northeast Portland home. Hooley has been an inspiration for the two entrepreneurs, both in their business development and their political involvement.


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Steven Bullock, right, interim director of Multnomah County's Office of Community and Family Services, speaks about emergency preparedness at an African American Health Coalition gathering last week at the Blazers Boys and Girls Club.


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The Seattle Seahawks suffered their first loss at home since 2004 on Oct. 22. A streak of 12 consecutive regular-season wins at Qwest Field came to an end with a 13-31 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.
But that's not all the Seahawks lost: Quarterback Matt Hasselbeck and sole possession of first place in the NFC West also went by the wayside.


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Barely half of Seattle residents who are eligible to receive food stamp assistance actually participate in the federal Food Stamp Program, according to a report released this week.
Seattle joins five other cities at the bottom of the food stamp participation list, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Food Research and Action Center program. The report takes a look at the food stamp participation in America's largest cities.


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Intiman Theatre and the Rev. Patrinell Wright, founder of the internationally acclaimed Total Experience Gospel Choir and a performer with Intiman's holiday show, "Black Nativity: A Gospel Play," are teaming up for two special events.
Wright and Jacqueline Moscou will lead the fourth Black Nativity workshop from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, in the Intiman Studio, 305 Harrison St. in the Seattle Center.


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Juana Rose Hernandez, left, and Richard Wilhelm look at the Vanport historical exhibit at the New Columbia Community Education Center on North Trenton Street. Wilhelm and filmmaker Sue Arbuthnot spent over three and half years documenting the deconstruction and reconstruction of Columbia Villa and New Columbia developments. Juana Rose lived in the old Columbia Villa, and attends Rose Parks Elementary school at New Columbia. Of note in the exhibit is the presence of the original Vanport housing numbers, which have been sanded down to their original cedar base and placed as the background wave in the exhibit.


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Portland Boulevard is soon to be known as Rosa Parks Way

A grass-roots effort under way to rename Portland Boulevard for civil rights heroine Rosa Parks passed its first milestone Wednesday when the proposal was aired at a Portland City Council meeting. The council unanimously passed a resolution to change the North Portland street's name to Rosa Parks Way.
An enthusiastic contingent of supporters filled council chambers for the hearing. The plan was conceived by the Albina Ministerial Alliance — a coalition of local clergy — and is being championed within the council by City Commissioner Dan Saltzman. A vote on an ordinance to make the name change official could come up before the council as soon as next Wednesday, Oct. 25.
"The hearing was overwhelmingly positive," said the Rev. W.G. Hardy, of Highland United Church of Christ, who testified at the hearing. "There was an excellent turnout, good representation from the community."
Hardy said the choice of Portland Boulevard is a good one for a range of reasons, not the least of which would be its symbolic intersection with several streets, including Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

 


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