05-25-2018  7:39 am      •     
The Skanner Careers

Northwest News

Oct. 21 event is part of Portland mayor"s "10-Minute Talks" series

Portland Mayor Tom Potter will meet with residents in Beaumont-Wilshire, Cully, Rose City Park and surrounding neighborhoods from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, at Blue Moose Café, 4936 N.E. Fremont St.

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Douglass-Truth library to return after massive remodeling project

After 16 months of construction, the newly expanded Douglass-Truth Branch Library will reopen to the public at noon Saturday, Oct. 14. The 16,493-square-foot branch, at 2300 E. Yesler Way, has more than doubled in size, up from 8,008 square feet.


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The image of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will soon represent area

A nationally known Seattle firm will design a new King County logo using an image of Noble Peace Prize winner and slain civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
Through a jury selection process, Gable Design Group came out ahead of a field of 29 local and out-of-state companies, the largest response ever received by King County for a design contract.
The proposal includes subcontracts with longtime Gable associates Vivian Phillips and Sharon Maeda for outreach.
King County's cultural service provider, 4Culture, managed the selection process.


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School district working to remove barriers to underutilized businesses

Small contractors looking for work with Seattle Public Schools are in luck. The Historically Underutilized Businesses Program is available to assist small contractors in securing publicly funded projects and contracts.
The program's mission is to remove barriers that prevent small, historically underused business from bidding for and participating in Seattle Public Schools projects. Through workshops and other training, the program advises small-business owners how they can participate in those projects.


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OLYMPIA—Seattle-area health advocate Winona Hollins-Hauge will represent the area on the…


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Cassandra Baddeley, a fifth-grade teacher at Thurgood Marshall Elementary was one of two Washington teachers to receive the prestigious Milken Family Foundation National Educator Award this year. The $25,000 dollar prize is give to 100 educators nationwide who are furthering excellence in education. Baddeley researched and incorporated instructional strategies into her all-girl classroom that have proven to be successful in teaching girls.


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Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski paid a visit to The Skanner's North Killingsworth Street offices Oct. 6 to discuss some of the items on his agenda and to answer questions and concerns from members of the African American community. The governor spoke about the importance of training more skilled tradespeople to fill the growing number of skilled job vacancies in the Oregon marketplace.


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Colleen Brundage, left, of Camas, Wash., gets beginners' information from genealogist Leslie Lawson at the Genealogical Forum of Oregon's annual open house on Oct. 7. Brundage is researching her Scottish, American Indian, Irish and African history.


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BERKELEY, Calif.--The Black Panther Party officially existed for just 16 years, but its reach has endured far longer.
Co-founder Bobby Seale never expected to be around to see that reach 40 years later.
"A lot of times I thought I would be dead," he said.
Seale and other former members commemorated the party's founding at a reunion in Oakland over the weekend. They held workshops on topics ranging from Hurricane Katrina to ethnic studies in higher education, as well as presentations on party history.
"Grass roots, community, programmatic organizing for the purpose of evolving political, electoral, community empowerment," Seale said. "This was my kind of revolution. This was what I was after."
The Panthers were born Oct. 22, 1966, the night Seale and Huey Newton completed the party's 10-point program and platform. At the time, Newton was a law student and Seale was working for the Oakland Department of Human Resources as a community liaison.
When they were finished, they flipped a silver dollar to see who would be chair. Seale called heads. Heads it was.


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Part I of The Skanner"s guide to the Nov. 7 general election

If you are at least 18 years old, a United States citizen and an Oregon resident, you have an opportunity to make changes the old-fashioned way: You can vote in the Nov. 7 general election.
It's not too late to register for the election; the deadline is Oct. 17, and a registration form can be downloaded from the Web site www.sos.state.or.us/elections/votreg/vreg.htm
Ballots will be mailed in Multnomah County on Oct. 20; they must be returned to the county elections office no later than 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7. Postmarks do not count.
This year, voters will select a governor and choose among candidates for state and local offices. They also will have eight statewide ballot measures to decide on, with issues ranging from parental permission for abortion to tax deductions.
This week, The Skanner gives a brief overview of four of the eight statewide issues; the other four issues will be discussed in The Skanner's edition on Oct. 11.


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