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NORTHWEST NEWS

The Skanner in Step With Changing Times

Celebrating a history of service

Starbucks, Home of the $4 Latte, is Moving Into Poor Areas

Starbucks plans to open or remodel 85 stores by 2025 in rural and urban communities across the U.S. The effort will bring to 100 the number of "community stores" Starbucks has opened since it announced the program in 2015

Native American Curriculum Rolls Out in Oregon Classrooms

The state developed the curriculum, as required by Senate Bill 13, with the input of Native leaders for 18 months, but is still behind. A soft roll-out begins this month

Community Surprised at Police Chief’s Departure, Concerned by Quick Replacement

Deputy Chief Jami Resch immediately named as successor.

NEWS BRIEFS

Annual “Salute to Greatness” Luncheon Celebrating Students, Community & Civic Leaders

Keynote Speaker: Ms. Rukaiyah Adams, Chair of Oregon Investment Council & Chief Investment Officer at Meyer Memorial Trust....

Grant High School Students to Read Their Own Work at Broadway Books

Local author and writing instructor Joanna Rose will lead thegroup of young writers at the event to be held on Wednesday, January 22 ...

AG Rosenblum Announces $4 Million Settlement with CenturyLink

Since 2014, Oregon DOJ has received more than 1,200 consumer complaints about CenturyLink ...

Black Guest at Downtown Portland Hotel Sues Over ‘No Party’ Promise

Felicia Gonzales claims the front desk clerk at the Residence Inn told her that all guests had to sign the policy, but she watched...

National Urban League Warns Trump Administration: Don't Weaken Community Reinvestment Act to Allow Racial Discrimination in Lending

Proposed changes to the Community Reinvestment Act could further limit access to the American Dream ...

Fires set stage for irreversible forest losses in Australia

Australia’s forests are burning at a rate unmatched in modern times and scientists say the landscape is being permanently altered as a warming climate brings profound changes to the island continent.Heat waves and drought have fueled bigger and more frequent fires in parts of Australia, so...

Off-duty fire lieutenant stabbed at Portland bar

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Police say they're investigating after an off-duty Portland fire lieutenant was stabbed at a bar.The lieutenant's wife called called from the Kingston Sports Bar and Grill on Southwest Morrison Street at just after 8 p.m. Saturday to say her husband had been stabbed by...

New Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz predicts success

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz was saying all the right things after being introduced as the new football coach at Missouri, laying out his vision for the once-proud program with unwavering confidence and bold proclamations.Then the former Appalachian State coach made a minor...

LSU's Burrow, Auburn's Brown named AP SEC players of year

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow is a unanimous selection as the offensive player of the year on The Associated Press All-Southeastern Conference football team.The top-ranked Tigers also have the SEC’s coach of the year in Ed Orgeron and the newcomer of the year in freshman cornerback Derek...

OPINION

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

How Putting Purpose Into Your New Year’s Resolutions Can Bring Meaning and Results

Only 4% of people report following through on all of the resolutions they personally set ...

I Was Just Thinking… Mama in the Classroom

I wrote my first column in 1988 for a local newspaper about a beloved Dallas guidance counselor and teacher that most students called “Mama” ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

A look at expected participants in Virginia gun rally

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — State officials and U.S. hate-monitoring groups are warning about the potential for violence ahead of a gun-rights rally in Virginia that's expected to draw a mix of militias, firearms advocates and white supremacists to Richmond. Citing credible threats of violence,...

Martin Luther King holiday: Faith, politics mix this holiday

ATLANTA (AP) — The nation is marking the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. with tributes Monday recalling his past struggles for racial equality, observing the federal holiday named for him against the backdrop of a presidential election year.In an early tribute to King, Vice...

Virginia's capital braces for gun-rights rally

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia’s capital city is bracing for the expected arrival of thousands of gun-rights activists and other groups that have vowed to descend on Richmond to protest Democrats’ plans to pass gun-control legislation. Gov. Ralph Northam declared a temporary...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Downton Abbey' creator's new TV show is painfully accurate

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — The period costumes of a Julian Fellowes drama can be excruciatingly accurate, as an actress in his new series “Belgravia” discovered.The Epix drama from “Downton Abbey” creator Fellowes and executive producer Gareth Neame is set in...

Robert De Niro gets political as he accepts SAG Awards honor

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Robert De Niro received the Screen Actors Guild lifetime achievement award Sunday to praise for his illustrious career and thunderous applause from his fellow performers, but spent much of his acceptance speech on politics. “There's right and there's wrong, and...

Prince Harry: 'No other option' but to cut royal ties

LONDON (AP) — Prince Harry said Sunday that he felt “great sadness” but found “no other option” to cutting almost all of his and his wife Meghan’s royal ties in the hopes of achieving a more peaceful life.The comments were Harry’s first public...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

'Parasite' parties, Leo greets young fans inside SAG Awards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Off-camera and during commercials, the stars at the Screen Actors Guild Awards got to...

After cashing in on QB gambles, Niners, Chiefs in Super Bowl

A little more than two years ago, a pair of teams gambled on quarterbacks who had all kinds of potential but were...

Election 2020: The unexpected durability of Biden, Sanders

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — When Sen. Kamala Harris’ advisers assessed the Democratic primary field...

Heating pipe bursts in Russian hotel, boiling water kills 5

MOSCOW (AP) — A heating pipe burst Monday in small Russian hotel, flooding rooms with boiling water that...

Fires set stage for irreversible forest losses in Australia

Australia’s forests are burning at a rate unmatched in modern times and scientists say the landscape is...

Violence escalates in Beirut as protesters clash with police

BEIRUT (AP) — Security forces fired tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets in clashes Sunday with...

McMenamins
Clarke Canfield the Associated Press

FREEPORT, Maine (AP) -- Three days after 9/11, Elaine Greene held an American flag above her on a busy street corner in this small Maine town. Since then, she and two other women have waved the flag on the same corner for an hour every Tuesday in honor of America's service personnel and to show that the American spirit is alive and kicking.

Changed forever by the 2001 terror attacks, Greene, JoAnn Miller and Carmen Footer have devoted their lives to inspiring others through the flag. Dressed in stars-and-stripes shirts, they are a familiar sight, proudly holding their 3-foot-by-5-foot flags on poles as motorists honk their horns and shout words of encouragement.

To mark the 10th anniversary of the attacks, the Freeport Flag Ladies, as they are known, have organized three days of vigils, concerts, a laser light show, a parade and other events. For two hours Sunday morning, they will be in their usual place, holding flags while flanked by Maine's two U.S. senators, a U.S. representative, the governor and the head of the Maine National Guard.

Before 9/11, the three weren't particularly patriotic. But they've come to see the good that can come from even a seemingly small gesture like proudly holding the U.S. flag.

Greene wasn't even sure if picking up a flag was the right thing to do on Sept. 14, 2001, when President George W. Bush asked Americans to hold candlelight vigils. But when she did, she saw the strain on people's faces melt away as they drove by, beeped their horns and yelled out "God Bless America."

"You knew then that you could do something," Greene said this week in the house she shares with Miller and Footer. "You knew then that the American people realized within their own spirit that we're going to be OK, we're going to get through this and that the American spirit wasn't dead. It just got injured a little bit."

Since then, the women have showed up every Tuesday - the attacks took place on a Tuesday - at the corner of Main and School streets with flags in hand. They haven't missed a day, braving hot summer sun, blizzards, nor'easters and thunderstorms with lightning.

Greene once checked herself out of a hospital following surgery against a doctor's orders so she'd be there, even if it was in a wheelchair. The doctor wanted her stay at the hospital for six days, but she left after three.

"I didn't have six days. Tuesday was coming up," she said.

Over the years, they've also shown up at Bangor International Airport and New Hampshire's Pease International in support of troops going to and from Afghanistan and Iraq.

For their efforts, service personnel have sent them flags flown on missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. One flag that flew on the bottom side of helicopter in Iraq has a bullet hole from enemy combatants who fired at it.

Sen. Susan Collins sent them flags flown in their honor over ground zero, over the Pentagon and over the field in Pennsylvania where one of the four planes crashed on 9/11. Sen. Olympia Snowe sent them flags flown over the Capitol in their honor.

Greene is 65, Miller is 74 and Footer is 69. Each is retired, but being part of the Freeport Flag Ladies keeps them busy.

Their website gets 250,000 to 1 million hits a month. They send out an email message with inspirational words every Tuesday that goes to 3,600 people.

In the corner of one room in their home stands an artificial Christmas tree, holding scores of patriotic ornaments sent to them from people around the country.

They have vowed to not take down the tree until the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are over.

When that happens, they all agree it will be a good day.

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Online: http://www.freeportflagladies.com/

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

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