06-21-2018  2:27 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

AG Rosenblum Seeks Info from Oregonians

Oregon Attorney General seeks information on children separated from families at border ...

Community Forum: How Does Law Enforcement Interact With Vulnerable Populations?

Forum will focus on public safety and examine mental health and addiction issues ...

King County Council Recognizes Juneteenth

The Metropolitan King County Council recognizes a true 'freedom day' in the United States ...

Unite Oregon Hosts ‘Mourn Pray Love, and Take Action’ June 20

Community is invited to gather at Terry Schrunk Plaza at 6 p.m. on World Refugee Day ...

MRG Foundation Announces Spring 2018 Grantees

Recipients include Oregon DACA Coalition, Kúkátónón Children’s African Dance Troupe, Komemma Cultural Protection Association ...

Washington, other states plan to sue over family separations

SEATAC, Wash. (AP) — Washington and more than a half-dozen other states said Thursday that they plan to sue the Trump administration over a policy of separating immigrant families illegally entering the United States.Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson made the announcement Thursday...

Researchers to study why seabird species is disappearing

CANNON BEACH, Ore. (AP) — The tufted puffins population at Haystack Rock in Oregon's Cannon Beach is steadily declining, and no one knows why.Federal wildlife officials will study the low count of the seabird with a ,000 donation from the Friends of Haystack Rock, the Daily Astorian...

Washington, other states plan to sue over family separations

SEATAC, Wash. (AP) — Washington and more than a half-dozen other states said Thursday that they plan to sue the Trump administration over a policy of separating immigrant families illegally entering the United States.Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson made the announcement Thursday...

APNewsBreak: Schools mum on ties to doc in sex abuse inquiry

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A now-dead doctor accused of sexual misconduct by former student athletes at Ohio State University said he acted as a team physician at other universities, most of which won't say if they are reviewing those connections or whether any concerns were raised about him.Ohio...

OPINION

How Washington’s 'School Achievement Index' Became School Spending Index

New assessment categorizes schools not by quality of education, but level of funding officials believe they should receive ...

Black Mamas Are Dying. We Can Stop It.

Congresswoman Robin Kelly plans to improve access to culturally-competent care with the MOMMA Act ...

Hey, Elected Officials: No More Chicken Dinners...We Need Policy

Jeffrey Boney says many elected officials who visit the Black community only during the election season get a pass for doing nothing ...

Juneteenth: Freedom's Promise Still Denied

Juneteenth is a celebration of the de facto end of slavery, but the proliferation of incarceration keeps liberation unfulfilled ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Intel CEO out after consensual relationship with employee

NEW YORK (AP) — Intel CEO Brian Krzanich resigned after the company learned of what it called a past, consensual relationship with an employee.Intel said Thursday that the relationship was in violation of the company's non-fraternization policy, which applies to all managers. Spokesman...

3 men face hate crimes charges in Minnesota mosque bombing

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A grand jury has added civil rights and hate crimes violations to charges three Illinois men face in the bombing of a mosque in the Minneapolis suburb of Bloomington.Federal prosecutors announced the new five-count indictment Thursday against 47-year-old Michael Hari,...

Governor orders probe of abuse claims by immigrant children

WASHINGTON (AP) — Virginia's governor ordered state officials Thursday to investigate abuse claims by children at an immigration detention facility who said they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left nude and shivering in concrete...

ENTERTAINMENT

AP PHOTOS: Toasts, kisses and laughs at Clooney AFI gala

LOS ANGELES (AP) — George Clooney, this is your life.The American Film Institute hosted a star-studded gala earlier this month to honor the Oscar-winner's achievements as an actor, director and activist. The evening kicked off with a video message from former President Barack Obama, and...

Mike Colter brings the pain as the indestructible Luke Cage

ATLANTA (AP) — "Black Panther" broke box office records, but "Luke Cage" once crashed Netflix.The streaming service suffered a massive outage for more than two hours in 2016, one day after the premiere of "Luke Cage," a drama-action series starring Mike Colter who plays the show's superhero...

Directors Guild says industry is still mostly white and male

NEW YORK (AP) — A new study by the Directors Guild of America finds that despite high-profile releases like "Get Out" and "Wonder Woman," film directors remained overwhelmingly white and male among the movies released last year.The DGA examined all 651 feature films released theatrically in...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Intel CEO out after consensual relationship with employee

NEW YORK (AP) — Intel CEO Brian Krzanich resigned after the company learned of what it called a past,...

New evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer's

WASHINGTON (AP) — Viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer's, scientists...

AP FACT CHECK: Trump falsely claims progress on NKorea nukes

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is trumpeting results of his summit with North Korean leader Kim...

Libyan coast guard rescues over 520 Europe-bound migrants

CAIRO (AP) — Libya's coast guard has rescued three groups of more than 520 African migrants, including at...

Switzerland, Serbia coaches don't want to talk about Kosovo

KALININGRAD, Russia (AP) — The coaches of Serbia and Switzerland only want to talk about football, not...

Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States attacked first, imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum from around the...

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. G. K. Butterfield, D-N.C., center, accompanied by, from left, Rep. Joyce Beatty , D-Ohio, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., Butterfield, Rep. Gregory W. Meeks, D-N.Y., and Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 8, 2016 file photo Black voters reacted skeptically on Friday to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s public admission that he now believes the nation’s first black president was indeed born in the United States. Many said the fact that Trump spent many years questioning President Barack Obama’s national origin was disrespectful, and an insult to all black Americans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
JESSE J. HOLLAND, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black voters reacted skeptically Friday to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's admission that he now believes the nation's first black president was indeed born in the United States. Many said the fact that Trump spent years questioning President Barack Obama's national origin was disrespectful, and an insult to all black Americans.

Despite the fact that Obama himself said he viewed this renewed burst of commentary about his birth as "fairly typical" and not surprising, members of the Congressional Black Caucus were clearly angry. During a heated news conference Friday during the CBC's annual legislative conference in Washington, several lawmakers denigrated Trump for perpetrating birther falsehoods for so long.

"He owes an apology to President Barack Obama, he owes an apology to African-American community and he owes an apology to the United States of America," said Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., adding that he considers Trump to be "nothing but a two-bit racial arsonist."

Reps. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, and G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., called Trump a "cheap racist" and a "disgusting fraud," respectively.

Many blacks gave Trump no credit for finally letting go of the long dispelled notion that Obama, born in Hawaii in 1961, actually hailed from outside the country he now leads. They said they believed it was some sort of political calculation by Trump in hopes of getting votes from blacks or moderate whites.

"In the black community, it's always been viewed as kind of offhanded racism," said Preston Thymes, a Scottsdale, Arizona, marketing manager.

Roosevelt Brown, 56, said he felt black voters, at least, weren't buying Trump's about-face. "I don't believe in his heart he's saying what he really believes," said Brown, a special investigator in California.

"He's a backtracker," said Bailey Billings, 25, of Madison, Wisconsin. "He says whatever he thinks he should say, what he's directed by his team to say, to make him seem like a better human that we should all vote for. ... I just don't care for anything that he says."

And Trump's attempt to pull Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton into the fray by claiming she endorsed birther tactics against Obama during their 2008 race didn't seem to sit well with some black voters either.

"He's a big liar and he's just trying to put people against Hillary," said Wilma Brown, a 66-year-old Detroit housewife.

Trump's political rise was fueled in part by his presence among birthers, and as recently as this week, he declined to say where he believed Obama was born. In reversing his stance Friday, Trump did not say why, or when, he changed his mind.

Questions about Obama's legitimacy strike a nerve with many black voters, said Corey Fields, a Stanford University sociology professor and author of "Black Elephants In The Room," a book about black Republicans.

"It's an effort to delegitimize a very powerful and compelling achievement by an African-American political leader," Fields said. "Often black voters can translate this to their own lived experience moving through the white professional (world) where the legitimacy of your achievements are often called into question. This is a very similar process on a large scale. This is something that can resonate at an individual level."

Several black Republicans have also expressed disgust at Trump's connections with the birther movement.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell criticized Trump in leaked emails released earlier this week. "All his lies and nonsense just pile up," Powell wrote. "I just go back to the unforgivable one. Trying to destroy the President elected by the American people with his fictitious investigation into this source of birth. Absolutely disgraceful." Powell has not denied the leaked emails' authenticity.

Others questioned why Trump and his campaign would not squash the issue immediately, with the November election so close. Renee Amoore, who is leading black voter outreach efforts for Trump in Pennsylvania, said Trump has "gotten better" and "been on message" in recent weeks, and is not sure why Trump chose to respond to his role in the birther movement now.

"For whatever reason, somebody thought this was part of the message," said Amoore, referring to Trump's campaign, which released a statement late Thursday on the issue.

Daphne Goggins, 53, a longtime registered Republican who serves as a ward leader in Philadelphia, still blames Clinton's surrogates for propagating the issue, and is angry that Trump is being held responsible for the false claims that Obama was not an American.

"I'm not understanding how she can dump this on Trump now," Goggins said. "Who knows? They may have even been doing it together. But who cares? It shouldn't be an issue."

Rufus Bartell, a Detroit businessman and founder of a retail and consulting group, said there's been too much damage for Trump to make up with many black voters, who have been a powerful voting bloc during Obama's time in Washington.

In presidential election years, the percentage of black voters eclipsed the percentage of whites for the first time in 2012, when 66.2 percent of blacks voted, compared with 64.1 percent of non-Hispanic whites and about 48 percent of Hispanics and Asians.

"I think it's too late, regardless of what he does. But if he really wants a relationship with the African-American community, then it's certainly not too late to start a relationship. It just won't impact this election," Bartell said.

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Associated Press journalists Errin Haines Whack in Philadelphia, Corey Williams in Detroit, Paul J. Weber in Austin, Texas, Dylan T. Lovan in Louisville, and Alina Hartounian in Phoenix contributed to this story.

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