05-21-2018  9:39 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Raina Croff to Speak at Architectural Heritage Center

'When the Landmarks are Gone: Older African Americans, Place, and Change in N/NE Portland’ describes SHARP Walking Program ...

Portland Playhouse Presents August Wilson’s ‘Fences’ Through June 10

May 20 performance will include discussion on mental health; June 10 performance will be followed by discussion of fatherhood ...

Peggy Houston-Shivers Presents Benefit Concert for Allen Temple CME

Concert to take place May 20 at Maranatha Church ...

Family Friendly Talent Show, May 18

Family Fun Night series continues at Matt Dishman Community Center ...

Settlement reached in LGBT school harassment

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — An openly gay couple was walking in their Oregon high school parking lot when the principal's son drove up, veered away at the last second and shouted an anti-gay slur at the two girls. In class, a teacher equated same-sex marriage with bestiality.The girls complained to...

The Latest: Settlement reached in LGBT school harassment

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Latest on the case of LGBTQ discrimination at an Oregon high school.6:30 p.m.:The principal of an Oregon high school will resign and its school district will commit to improving the climate for LGBTQ students as part of a settlement reached between the American Civil...

Paul Allen donates jumiM to Washington gun initiative

SEATTLE (AP) — Microsoft co-founder and Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen has donated jumi million to a campaign seeking to raise the age to purchase semi-automatic rifles from 18 to 21 in Washington state.Allen made the announcement on Twitter Monday.The Alliance for Gun Responsibility says...

Man accused of trying to kill woman with opioid spray

MUKILTEO, Wash. (AP) — An Everett man is accused of holding down his ex-girlfriend at a Mukilteo hotel, shoving Xanax down her throat and forcing a fentanyl spray up her nose in what police say was attempted murder.The Daily Herald reports the woman survived and was able to escape and alert...

OPINION

Golfing While Black Is Not a Crime

Grandview Golf Club asks five Black women to leave for golfing too slow ...

Discovering the Best of Black America in 2018

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis discusses the DTU Journalism Fellowship & Scholarship Program ...

Will Israel’s Likud Party Ever Respect the Rights of Palestinians?

Bill Fletcher weighs in on the precarious future of the two-state solution between the Israeli government and the Palestinian people ...

The Future of Medicinal Marijuana in Pets

Dr. Jasmine Streeter says CBD-derived products show beneficial therapeutic benefits for pets ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

China sentences Tibetan activist to 5 years for separatism

BEIJING (AP) — China has sentenced a Tibetan language activist to five years in prison for inciting separatism after he appeared in a documentary video produced by The New York Times.Tashi Wangchuk's lawyer Liang Xiaojun told The Associated Press that a judge in Qinghai province passed down...

Settlement reached in LGBT school harassment

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — An openly gay couple was walking in their Oregon high school parking lot when the principal's son drove up, veered away at the last second and shouted an anti-gay slur at the two girls. In class, a teacher equated same-sex marriage with bestiality.The girls complained to...

Correction: 2018 Midterms-Endorsements story

ATLANTA (AP) — In a story May 20 about potential Democratic presidential candidates and their campaign activity in 2018, The Associated Press reported erroneously that former Vice President Joe Biden was planning to campaign in North Carolina on behalf of a congressional candidate Dan...

ENTERTAINMENT

Actress who accused Weinstein needs money to finish film

NEW YORK (AP) — Actress Paz de la Huerta has started a crowdfunding campaign to finish a movie she began making years before she publicly accused Harvey Weinstein of rape.The movie "Valley of Tears" is her take on the Hans Christian Andersen story "The Red Shoes," about a little girl with a...

Sony invests in image sensors, acquires more of EMI Music

TOKYO (AP) — Electronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said Tuesday it plans to invest 1 trillion yen ( billion) mostly in image sensors over the next three years, under a revamped strategy to strengthen both hardware and creative content.Sony also plans to buy for [scripts/homepage/home.php].3 billion a 60...

At Cannes, a #MeToo upheaval up and down the Croisette

CANNES, France (AP) — Fifty years after filmmakers shut down the Cannes Film Festival, the prestigious Cote d'Azur extravaganza was again shook by upheaval.From the start to the finish, the 71st Cannes was dominated by protest and petition for gender equality, culminating in the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Artist Robert Indiana, known for 'LOVE' series, dies at 89

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Pop artist Robert Indiana, best known for his 1960s "LOVE" series, has died at his...

All tied up: LeBron's 44 helps Cavs even series with Celtics

CLEVELAND (AP) — LeBron James knows the path to the NBA Finals better than anyone in today's game.And...

Miss Nebraska wins Miss USA competition

SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — Sarah Rose Summers from Nebraska beat out 50 other women Monday to win this year's...

Congo Ebola vaccination campaign begins with health workers

KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo began an Ebola vaccination campaign Monday in a northwest provincial capital...

Social media under microscope in emotive Irish abortion vote

DUBLIN (AP) — In homes and pubs, on leaflets and lampposts, debate is raging in Ireland over whether to...

Aide: Palestinian leader making swift recovery in hospital

JERUSALEM (AP) — Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas is alert and making a swift recovery after being...

Illinois elections protestor
David Crary, AP National Writer

In this Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014 photo, supporters of raising the minimum wage rally outside where Democrat Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn and Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner have their first televised debate in Peoria Ill. When Illinois voters cast ballots this year, they won't just get a chance to weigh in on a nationally watched governor's race. They also will have to wade through a record five ballot questions ranging from proposed constitutional amendments on voter rights and victim rights to poll-style referendum questions on birth control, a minimum wage hike and a proposed new tax on millionaires. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

NEW YORK (AP) — A total of 147 ballot measures will go before voters on Election Day, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The topics range from marijuana legalization and abortion to food labels and gun sales.

Some of the notable measures:

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RETHINKING POT

Is pot on its way toward nationwide acceptance? Voters in Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C., will have their say as they weigh in on measures that would allow recreational use of pot by adults. "Yes" votes would build on the momentum of the 2012 general election, when Washington state and Colorado became the first states to legalize marijuana. The measures in Oregon and Alaska would allow retail sales of pot to anyone old enough to drink. The measure in the District of Columbia would make it legal to grow and possess marijuana, but not sell it.

In Florida, voters will decide whether to make their state the 24th to allow marijuana use for medical reasons. That measure, which needs 60 percent approval to pass, has divided the rivals in Florida's closely contested gubernatorial race. Republican Gov. Rick Scott opposes the measure, Democrat Charlie Crist supports it.

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ABORTION DEBATE

Three measures related directly or indirectly to abortion have sparked bitter debate, in part because each side disagrees over the potential impact.

In Colorado, a "personhood" amendment would add fetuses to those protected by the state's criminal and wrongful death act. Opponents say it could lead to a ban on abortions; supporters say it's intended to strengthen protections for pregnant women.

In North Dakota, Measure 1 would provide "the inalienable right to life" for humans at "any stage of development." Supporters and opponents differ on what impact it might have on abortion regulations.

A measure in Tennessee would give state legislators more power to regulate abortion. Supporters say the proposed amendment is needed to protect existing regulations. Opponents fear it would make it easier for Tennessee to adopt tough new laws that would jeopardize women's access to abortions.

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GAMBLING SHOWDOWN

There's been a huge expansion of casino gambling across the country in recent decades.

Massachusetts voters have a rare chance to say, "Enough." A ballot measure there would repeal a 2011 law authorizing development of a slots parlor and up to three resort casinos. The state has none now.

According to one expert, Clyde Barrow of the University of Texas-Pan American, a victory for the anti-casino forces would mark the first time — at least since the modern era of U.S. gambling began in 1931 — that a state reversed a major legislative decision to expand gambling.

The would-be casino developers are making vigorous pitches to keep their projects on track. For example, Wynn Resorts is promising to spend at least $30 million on cleanup efforts as part of its plans to turn a polluted former chemical plant near Boston into a $1.6 billion resort.

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GUN SALES

With two competing gun-related measures on their ballot, voters in Washington state have an unusual opportunity to sound off in the national debate over firearms.

One measure seeks background checks for all gun sales and transfers, including private transactions. The other would prevent any such expansion covering purchases from private sellers. Supporters of the expanded checks, aided by gifts from Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen, have spent far more than the anti-expansion campaign.

Six states require universal background checks for all sales and transfers of firearms. Washington's law, like the federal law, requires checks for sales or transfers by licensed dealers but not for purchases from private sellers.

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FOOD FIGHT

Colorado and Oregon have measures that would require labeling of certain genetically modified foods. Each proposal would apply to raw and packaged foods produced entirely or partially by genetic engineering, but would not apply to food served in restaurants.

Opponents of the requirements, including food corporations and biotech companies, say mandatory labels would be costly and would mislead consumers into thinking engineered ingredients are unsafe, which scientists have not proved. Supporters of the measures, who have been outspent in both campaigns, say consumers have a right to know if the food they eat has been genetically modified.

In Oregon, it's become the costliest ballot measure campaign in state history, with the two sides raising more than $23 million as of a week ago. Opponents of labeling outraised supporters by more than 2-to-1.

Similar measures in California and in Washington state failed narrowly in recent years after millions of dollars were spent, mostly by labeling opponents.

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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