04-03-2020  8:57 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Latest COVID-19 Projections Encouraging With Social Distancing

Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May

Five Metro Council Candidates Discuss Equity

District 5 candidates compete for open seat

Inslee: Washington Needs More Coronavirus Test Supplies

The governor suggested the shutdown of most businesses and extreme social distancing would likely have to be extended to fight the disease

Trump Approves Major Disaster Declaration for Oregon

Gov. Brown praised the declaration, but says we still have significant requests pending, "first and foremost Oregon's request for more personal protective equipment from the national stockpile"

NEWS BRIEFS

Senators Demand Expanded Internet Access for Low-Income Oregonians Throughout COVID-19 Crisis

Wyden, Merkley urge Lifeline internet service providers to expand service to ensure Oregonians can work and learn remotely, access...

U.S. Census Bureau Statement on 2020 Census Call Centers

The phones may be busy at some call centers, but the public can respond to the Census online anytime ...

Oregon Medicaid Program Gains Flexibility to Better Serve Low-income Oregonians During Pandemic

Nearly one in four Oregonians currently receives health coverage through OHP. ...

Washington Elementary School Offers Food-Bearing Container Gardens During Meal Distribution

Large pots with food-bearing plants will be available for families to take home on Wednesday, April 1, from Catlin Elementary in...

Waterfront Blues Festival Cancelled for 2020

Organizers say the decision to cancel the popular festival was not taken lightly ...

Man arrested in murder of Portland pawn shop manager

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Police arrested a 22-year-old man Thursday in connection with the fatal shooting of a pawn shop manager earlier this week in Portland. Joseph Schneider was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of first-degree murder and first-degree robbery, according to the...

Man sentenced to 7 years in federal prison for child porn

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A 42-year-old man has been sentenced to seven years in federal prison and five years supervised release for transporting and having child pornography. The Oregon U.S. Attorney’s Office says Jonathan Murphy was sentenced Thursday. Court documents say in 2017,...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

You're Pretty... For a Dark-Skinned Girl

Cloé Luv, an "unapologetically" dark-skinned Black woman tells her story ...

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

What the Government Can Do Now to Lessen the Impact of COVID-19

Dr. Roger Stark says during this pandemic the administration must give states more flexibility ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Study: Gonzaga, Michigan top academics-based NCAA brackets

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Gonzaga and Michigan stood out in a study that seeded men’s and women’s NCAA Tournament brackets based on graduation rates, academic success and diversity in the head-coaching ranks.The Zags were a No. 1 seed in both brackets released Thursday by The...

Study: racial graduation-rate gap grows for men's NCAA teams

A diversity report for graduation rates among potential NCAA Tournament teams found a larger gap between white and black men’s players from the previous year, while male players continue to lag behind their female counterparts overall.The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES)...

Judge: Man linked to white supremacist group to stay in jail

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A Maryland man linked by the FBI to a white supremacist group and arrested ahead of a gun rights rally in Virginia must remain in federal custody while he awaits trial, a judge ruled Tuesday.U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Boardman refused to set bond for Brian Mark...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: A lewd buddy cop comedy in ‘Coffee & Kareem’

Your enjoyment of the new Netflix comedy “ Coffee & Kareem ” may depend on whether or not you find insanely vulgar middle schoolers funny. It’s not just cursing either. Oh no, this is a whole symphony of vulgarity that would make Seth Rogen blush. “Coffee &...

The Cuomo show, Andrew and Chris, enliven coronavirus TV

NEW YORK (AP) — With all their familial love and drama, the Cuomo brothers — Andrew during the daytime, Chris at night — have become compelling figures in the plague-driven landscape of American television.Andrew, New York's governor, holds a near daily televised briefing on...

Tribeca Film Festival to proceed, in part, online

NEW YORK (AP) — The Tribeca Film Festival, postponed by the pandemic, is moving some elements of its annual New York event online.Tribeca organizers said Friday that much of its programming will be available either to the public or to the film industry over roughly the same days that the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Feeding the front lines, one duck confit at a time

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — On a break from the front lines, nurse practitioner Gabe Westhemier tucked into a...

Vendors return in Wuhan as China prepares virus memorial

WUHAN, China (AP) — Sidewalk vendors wearing face masks and gloves sold pork, tomatoes, carrots and other...

Coronavirus survivor: 'In my blood, there may be answers'

NEW YORK (AP) — Tiffany Pinckney remembers the fear when COVID-19 stole her breath. So when she recovered,...

AP PHOTOS: Greek capital's streets deserted during lockdown

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Deserted squares, padlocked parks, empty avenues where lines of cars once idled...

Agonizing decisions being made in Spain's virus hot spots

ZARZA DE TAJO, Spain (AP) — Raquel Fernández watched as cemetery workers lowered her grandmother's...

Chinese struggle to return to work as virus controls ease

WUHAN, China (AP) — After two months in locked-down Wuhan, Wei Lei was eager to get back to work on a...

McMenamins
Phill Wilson, NNPA Columnist

Scientific denialists have been around since, well… the beginning of recorded science. One group of denialists refused to believe that the earth was round. Another group insisted that the sun revolved around the earth until long after scientific evidence had proved it works the other way around. A group of denialists wants us to believe that President Obama is Muslim, while another group, called "birthers," continues to challenge his presidency because they refuse to believe he was born in the United States.
It should come as no surprise that there are AIDS denialists as well. Typically they either reject the fact that AIDS exists, disagree that HIV causes AIDS, claim that AIDS is caused by the very medications designed to treat it, or try to dissuade people from getting HIV tested.
Given the magnitude of the AIDS epidemic in Black America, we cannot allow ourselves to be either distracted or bamboozled by these types of dubious claims. In fact, we should consider AIDS denialists not only dangerous, but even enemies of our community. I completely understand how some of us might be nervous about getting tested.
Nearly 500,000 of the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV/AIDS are Black. Nearly 40 percent of Black Americans have a family member or close family friend who is living with or has died from HIV/AIDS. I have been living with HIV for nearly 30 years. Those of us living with HIV/AIDS or who have lost family and friends to it know painfully well that the connection between HIV and AIDS is not theoretical.
I also know first hand the benefits of getting HIV-tested early, receiving love and support from family and friends, and having access to appropriate care. I thank God that no denialist was by my bedside in 1996, when my doctors thought I had less than 24 hours to live and insisted I start new medical therapies. I am alive today and am living proof of the benefits of medical treatment.
Whether we're talking about their blood pressure, blood glucose, blood cholesterol or HIV status, every person needs as much information as possible to make informed decisions about their health. An HIV test tells us whether we have the virus that causes AIDS. When people who are HIV-positive know it, they can obtain the same kinds of life-extending and life-saving care and treatment that has helped me, including medications that can delay or even prevent some life-threatening conditions.
People who know their HIV status are also more likely to take precautions to prevent their partners from becoming infected than people who don't know they are positive. That's why I believe that all of us need to take responsibility for knowing our own and our partners' HIV status, and everyone should have access to HIV testing regardless of their ability to pay. Knowledge also empowers us with choices, including the option of whether to have unprotected sex or even to have sex at all. Knowing is greater than doubt.
Can the results of an HIV test be incorrect? Yes, but rarely. Similar to other screening tests—for various cancers, diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. —the test yields a very low number of inaccurate results. This is why positive HIV-test results are always confirmed by an additional test and why sexually active individuals are encouraged to get tested at least once a year even if they have tested negative in the past.
Acknowledging and confronting our risk of HIV/AIDS can be scary. Sometimes it seems easier to allow myths and misinformation to paralyze us and prevent us from taking action. But it would be tragic if we were to allow urban legends, conspiracy theories and fear-mongering about HIV/AIDS and HIV testing to drag us backwards so that we relive the suffering and death that existed during the 1980s.
There is a drastic difference between the healing and self-empowerment that happens in communities that confront HIV/AIDS directly and the death and devastation that takes place in communities that do not. Black Americans represent nearly half of the nation's new HIV/AIDS cases and nearly half of the AIDS-related deaths because for far too long, we either pretended that AIDS was not real or that it was somebody else's problem. Fortunately, in recent years Black leaders, institutions and community members have started to mobilize to confront HIV directly and honestly.
Ask anyone infected with or affected by HIV/AIDS, and they will tell you that AIDS is no joke. Knowing is greater than doubt.

Phill Wilson is the President and CEO of the Black AIDS Institute.


image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Prosper Portland Relief
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives